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View Full Version : Speaking of Jesus...our troops now pray to him,


banyon
05-12-2006, 02:20 PM
Measure allows chaplains’ prayers in name of Jesus
Current rules call for nonsectarian public ceremonies
The Washington Post
WASHINGTON — The House passed a $513 billion defense authorization bill Thursday that includes language intended to allow chaplains to pray in the name of Jesus at public military ceremonies.

The legislation would undercut new Air Force and Navy guidelines on religion.

The bill, which passed by a vote of 396-31, also contains significant adjustments to the Pentagon’s original request, mainly by shifting hundreds of millions of dollars toward military personnel — in the form of troop increases, protective gear, and health-care benefits — and away from new weapons systems. The measure includes $50 billion for next year’s cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“We’re not a rubber stamp,” House Armed Services Committee ranking member Ike Skelton, a Missouri Democrat, told reporters.

Before the bill reached the House floor, Republicans on the House Armed Services Committee added the provision on military chaplains.

It says each chaplain “shall have the prerogative to pray according to the dictates of the chaplain’s own conscience, except as must be limited by military necessity, with any such limitation being imposed in the least restrictive manner feasible.”

Air Force and Navy rules issued in recent months allow chaplains to pray as they wish in voluntary worship services. But the rules call for nonsectarian prayers, or a moment of silence, at public meetings or ceremonies, especially when attendance is mandatory for service members of all faiths.

Focus on the Family, the Christian Coalition and other evangelical Christian groups have lobbied vigorously against the Air Force and Navy rules, urging President Bush to issue an executive order guaranteeing the right of chaplains to pray in the name of Jesus under any circumstances. Because the White House has not acted, sympathetic members of Congress stepped in.

“We felt there needed to be a clarification” of the rules “because there is political correctness creeping into the chaplains corps,” said Rep. Walter Jones, a North Carolina Republican. “I don’t understand anyone being opposed to a chaplain having the freedom to pray to God in the way his conscience calls him to pray.”

Among the provision’s opponents is the chief of Navy chaplains, Adm. Louis Iasiello, a Roman Catholic priest.

“The language ignores and negates the primary duties of the chaplain to support the religious needs of the entire crew” and “will, in the end, marginalize chaplains and degrade their use and effectiveness,” Iasiello wrote in a letter to a committee member.

http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/nation/14559253.htm

http://webpages.charter.net/scralp/buddy%20jesus1.JPG

Mohammed
05-12-2006, 10:45 PM
As long they realise that the prayers are meaningless.

Taco John
05-12-2006, 10:50 PM
As long they realise that the prayers are meaningless.



What do you have against prayer, Tom?

Mohammed
05-12-2006, 10:53 PM
What do you have against prayer, Tom?



Prayers are useless when directed towards a nonexistent entity. Who is this "Tom"?

Taco John
05-12-2006, 11:16 PM
Who is this "Tom"?


If I had a nickle for every one of your personalities who asked this very question using the very same improper punctuation, why I'd have at least a buck or two...

Mohammed
05-12-2006, 11:39 PM
No, I'm Mohammed. Search your heart. You know that it is true.

CHIEF4EVER
05-12-2006, 11:44 PM
No, I'm Mohammed. Search your heart. You know that it is true.

If you are who you say you are would you mind doing me a favor and telling your followers to stop cutting off heads and blowing people up every time an Imam farts? Thanks in advance.

Mohammed
05-12-2006, 11:51 PM
If you are who you say you are would you mind doing me a favor and telling your followers to stop cutting off heads and blowing people up every time an Imam farts? Thanks in advance.

Those people don't follow me.

banyon
05-13-2006, 09:42 AM
Well I thought this might spark a debate about te establishment clause, but I can see that the thread-ruiner has been by. Thanks, dumbass.

beer bacon
05-13-2006, 09:48 AM
So why the **** was this piggy backed onto a 513 billion dollar military bill? I hate how our legislation voting process works.

banyon
05-13-2006, 09:50 AM
So why the **** was this piggy backed onto a 513 billion dollar military bill?

Why? Because they can, and so they can label opponents of this measure of not "supporting the troops"

I hate how our legislation voting process works.

That makes two of us. :clap:

CHIEF4EVER
05-13-2006, 01:32 PM
Only an insanely hateful anti Christian would have anything against a Chaplain praying in the name of and leading a service in the name of Jesus anytime he so chooses.

Chiefs Express II
05-13-2006, 01:41 PM
As someone that is a wiccan and with no Christianity as a background, why do you care?

CHIEF4EVER
05-13-2006, 01:46 PM
As someone that is a wiccan and with no Christianity as a background, why do you care?

Who are you talking to? I think you may be confused Tee Cee. I am a Christian, practicing and believing.

Adept Havelock
05-13-2006, 03:15 PM
Only an insanely hateful anti Christian would have anything against a Chaplain praying in the name of and leading a service in the name of Jesus anytime he so chooses.
:hmmm:
Out of curiousity, are you also equally OK with one of the Buddhist members of the Navy Chaplain Corps leading a public ceremony or a mandatory ceremony for troops of all faiths with only a Buddhist ritual?

Or, hypothetically speaking (as while Circles are permitted, led by "lay" members but a formal "chaplain" has not been recruited AFAICT) a Wiccan Chaplain leading a public ceremony, or ceremony for troops of all faiths with solely an invocation to the Lady and the Horned God?

Do you believe all practitioners of faith should be allowed to lead a service in the name of their faith anytime they so choose, even if Christian soldiers are required to attend said ceremony?


I think you may be confused Tee Cee.

Buddy, that might just be the understatement of the millenia! ;)

banyon
05-14-2006, 08:38 AM
Only an insanely hateful anti Christian would have anything against a Chaplain praying in the name of and leading a service in the name of Jesus anytime he so chooses.

Are you just baiting?

I'm a Christian, and I'm against this.

Earthling
05-14-2006, 08:51 AM
:hmmm:
Out of curiousity, are you also equally OK with one of the Buddhist members of the Navy Chaplain Corps leading a public ceremony or a mandatory ceremony for troops of all faiths with only a Buddhist ritual?

Or, hypothetically speaking (as while Circles are permitted, led by "lay" members but a formal "chaplain" has not been recruited AFAICT) a Wiccan Chaplain leading a public ceremony, or ceremony for troops of all faiths with solely an invocation to the Lady and the Horned God?

Do you believe all practitioners of faith should be allowed to lead a service in the name of their faith anytime they so choose, even if Christian soldiers are required to attend said ceremony?


Good question. This is what it all boils down to.

Chiefs Express II
05-14-2006, 09:49 AM
Who are you talking to? I think you may be confused Tee Cee. I am a Christian, practicing and believing.

banyon

banyon
05-14-2006, 10:31 AM
I am not directly replying to the poster in this thread, but I am a Christian Protestant. I believe that Nightwish is the Wiccan to which you refer.

Chiefs Express II
05-14-2006, 05:14 PM
I am not directly replying to the poster in this thread, but I am a Christian Protestant. I believe that Nightwish is the Wiccan to which you refer.

Well, I see that if you are what you profess to be that you fall into the hypocrite category as many of us have.

Practice makes perfect and it looks as if there are quite a few of us that claim Christianity have quite a way to go in the way of practice.

banyon
05-14-2006, 05:28 PM
Well, I see that if you are what you profess to be that you fall into the hypocrite category as many of us have.

Practice makes perfect and it looks as if there are quite a few of us that claim Christianity have quite a way to go in the way of practice.

Because I believe in a strict separation of Church and State, I am a hypocrite in my religion?

You don't know anything about my religious beliefs.

Chiefs Express II
05-14-2006, 05:31 PM
Because I believe in a strict separation of Church and State, I am a hypocrite in my religion?

You don't know anything about my religious beliefs.

Your language is what I'm talking about, it has nothing to do with Church and State. And yes, if you are what you say you are still falling short of meeting the criteria, just like the rest of us.

Christian Protestant isn't really a hard religion to understand, what makes you think I have no knowledge of your religion? If your specific beliefs are different than those of your church/religion you are still on the long list of hypocrits. Sorry!

And again you show your immaturity with the intended language (which is referred to above).