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Loki
05-13-2006, 01:55 AM
Iran overshadows Indonesia summit (http://edition.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/asiapcf/05/12/indonesia.d8/index.html)

(CNN) -- Leaders of eight predominantly Muslim developing nations opened a summit Saturday in Indonesia with Iran's nuclear program overshadowing the trade talks.

Though Iran's nuclear crisis was not officially on the summit's agenda, the issue was likely to be raised on the sidelines amid a tense international standoff over Tehran's uranium enrichment program and suspicions that Tehran is trying to develop atomic weapons.

"Our people need to do more to help one another, to cooperate with one another," said Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono in an opening statement Saturday, according to a report from The Associated Press. "We need to play an active part as subjects, not objects of the globalized world."

Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who began a state visit to Indonesia on Wednesday, is leading the Iranian delegation at the summit.

He met with leaders of Muslim groups in Jakarta Friday before heading to Bali for the meeting, which deals mainly with economic cooperation and is being hosted by Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.
The D-8 brings together eight mainly Muslim nations: Iran, Indonesia, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Turkey, Egypt and Nigeria.

At a media conference in Bali, Malaysia's deputy foreign minister said he would not be surprised if Iran's nuclear issue "crops up" during the discussions, Malaysia's Bernama news agency reported.

He said Iran might raise the issue so that other participants would understand its position.

Joseph said Malaysia was not against the use of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, as it could be of great benefit in areas such as energy, medicine and agricultural improvement.
Willing to talk

Ahmadinejad has said he is willing to negotiate with the United States and other world powers over his country's nuclear program.

He told a gathering of students in Jakarta Thursday that every country had the right to use new technology to meet its energy needs, not just America, The Associated Press reported.

He also called Israel "a tyrannical regime" headed for destruction, echoing his earlier calls for Israel to be wiped off the map, AP reported.
Ahmadinejad said his country was willing to open talks with the West, but that the United States first must drop its "bad attitude."

"We are not only defending our rights, we are defending the rights of many other countries," he said, according to AP. "By maintaining our position, we are defending our independence."

Ahmadinejad's visit to Indonesia, the world's most populous nation, comes just days after he sent a letter to U.S. President George W. Bush, the first direct communication between the leaders of both nations since the Islamic revolution in Tehran in 1979.

Bush administration officials have dismissed the gesture. But in Jakarta, Ahmadinejad said the diplomatic ball was still in the American court.

"If they choose not to answer, it depends on them. We think we made the correct decision to send this letter at this junction, and we have done it. It now depends on the other side," Ahmadinejad said Wednesday.
Incentive choice

This week, key U.N. Security Council members agreed to give Iran a choice of incentives or sanctions in deciding whether to meet a demand to suspend uranium enrichment.

Ahmadinejad told a Jakarta TV station in an interview Thursday morning that any threats against his country would make talks difficult.

"If someone points an arm (a weapon) at your face and says you must speak, will you do that?" he said, according to an Associated Press report.

The Iranian president said that Western nations with large stocks of nuclear weapons were practicing "double standards" in pressing Iran to stop its peaceful nuclear program, and dismissed the threat of sanctions.

"We do not need to be dependent on others," he said.

Earlier, Indonesia's president said he was willing to help mediate in the hope of finding a diplomatic solution.

Yudhoyono's spokesman, Dino Pati Djalal, said Iran was very receptive to the offer.

"We need to breathe new life into the negotiations," he said, according to a report from AP.

Yudhoyono has said he hoped Iran would continue dialogue with the U.N.'s nuclear watchdog.

"There is still room for a peaceful and just solution," he said. "President Ahmadinejad was more than willing to have a genuine and fair negotiation."

Loki
05-13-2006, 02:10 AM
ok... here's how it went down:

Ahmadinejad: so... gas prices suck these days don't they?

Yudhoyono: they sure do... so what were we going to discuss at the trade summit?

Ahmadinejad: well, i might have some cheap oil to "trade" with you (wink wink, nudge nudge) but i was kinda hoping you could do me a favor...

Yudhoyono: i'm listening...

Ahmadinejad: how about you help us with some "publicity" to get the UN, US, and UK off our backs?

Yudhoyono: rrright. of COURSE you guys are only enriching uranium for peaceful purposes... i mean isn't it every country's RIGHT to address it's energy needs? the iranians are peaceful and willing to negotiate...

Ahmadinejad: heh heh... this is going to be a great trade summit!

Yudhoyono: what trade summit?

Ahmadinejad: would you like that in regular or high-test?

Hydrae
05-13-2006, 01:03 PM
You know, in some ways I agree with the president of Iran. It is a double standard when we are sitting on our stockpile of weapons to tell the rest of the world they can't do what we have done already. If they are really doing this just for peaceful, energy reasons, then we are really barking up the wrong tree.

Now, before the bashing begins, I am not sure I want to trust Iran as to the purposes behind the enrichment program. Therein lies the rub when it comes to developing nations working on nuclear power.

Loki
05-13-2006, 04:09 PM
You know, in some ways I agree with the president of Iran. It is a double standard when we are sitting on our stockpile of weapons to tell the rest of the world they can't do what we have done already. If they are really doing this just for peaceful, energy reasons, then we are really barking up the wrong tree.

Now, before the bashing begins, I am not sure I want to trust Iran as to the purposes behind the enrichment program. Therein lies the rub when it comes to developing nations working on nuclear power.

bashing your opinion? i don't think so.

i don't think you're too far off in what MOST people feel about this whole situation. certainly if iran is just enriching uranium for energy purposes the by all means go for it. there are plenty of nations enriching uranium for just that purpose. (but most of them also comply with nuclear inspections to keep the international community at ease.)
much like you, i don't trust iran either. their relationship with the US is hostile at best. they have held our citizens hostage, sponsored and supported terrorism against our nation and our allies, and are still talking sh*t about us and baiting us to this day. their recent weapons tests, saber rattling, blatant disregard for international concerns and general sh*tty attitude solidifies my complete distrust of their motives.

what exactly to do about the situation seems to be a delicate decision.
:shrug: