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View Full Version : What do you expect from a retailer in terms of returning an item?


|Zach|
06-19-2006, 11:21 PM
What do you expect from a retail store when it comes to returning and item that is damaged, got worn out, or you don't need?

What kind of time span?

I have been working at an office supply place in furniture while I am trying to make some other things happen career wise. I dig the job and the people and they treat me well...aside from that I feel suprised time and again by the condition of products and time frames at which people feel they should still be able to return something.

What are your expectations?

Halfcan
06-19-2006, 11:35 PM
Where do you work-Walmart.

Der Flöprer
06-19-2006, 11:36 PM
90 days, any condition. As long as it wasn't self imposed. If it's well used, but broken to no fault of the purchaser, the retail store should take it back and return it to the manufacturer. Outside of 90 days, the retailer should have zero responsibility. No exceptions to any part of this rule.

Halfcan
06-19-2006, 11:37 PM
Oh never mind-an office place-needed to read closer. Tell that job to stick it-you have too much talent as a photographer.

KingPriest2
06-19-2006, 11:38 PM
Costco does not care one bit. They have a excellant return policy.

Return anytime any condition.

Baconeater
06-19-2006, 11:38 PM
If it's in it's original packaging ready to put back on the shelf and I have a receipt I would say no time limit, as long as you still carry the same exact product. If it's been opened or used, I wouldn't expect a store to give me a refund, but I would expect a replacement if it was defective.

Miles
06-19-2006, 11:40 PM
30 days and it should either be in perfect condition or obviously defective. Oh and if its an ugly jacket with a crest, spite is not a good enough reason to return it.

Baconeater
06-19-2006, 11:41 PM
90 days, any condition. As long as it wasn't self imposed. If it's well used, but broken to no fault of the purchaser, the retail store should take it back and return it to the manufacturer. Outside of 90 days, the retailer should have zero responsibility. No exceptions to any part of this rule.
So you're saying all retailers should give a 90-day unconditional warranty on everything they sell?

|Zach|
06-19-2006, 11:41 PM
Oh never mind-an office place-needed to read closer. Tell that job to stick it-you have too much talent as a photographer.
Ha, thank you.

I am working on it...I am on a path to get there...lots of great oppurtunities but I am not in a position to pay the bills with it.

So I work at OD...great people...health insurance...they give me time to do the photog thing when I need it.

Der Flöprer
06-19-2006, 11:47 PM
So you're saying all retailers should give a 90-day unconditional warranty on everything they sell?



Absolutely. You mark the products up, there is a cost to doing business. I understand that good customer service has died in 2006. However this is not an unreasonable request. The retailer holds much more clout with a manufacturer and will get their money back. Obviously as stated unconditional only goes as far as operational problems with the product. If you buy an alarm clock and drop kick it into traffic you're s.o.l but I think that is obvious anyway. You have a responsibility to your consumers to provide good working products. If they don't then time to sack up and deal with it. Either by not selling the product anymore, or making a statement to your manufacturer that it is unacceptable. Joe consumer could never accomplish what the people who are really buying the items can. They buy in bulk.

|Zach|
06-19-2006, 11:51 PM
In my experience the clout with the manufactuer isn't there as much as you see it. Like I said only my experience.

If a product isn't working then we do owe it to the consumer to get them something working or give their money back...thats not a problem at all the deserve it.

But 90 days? I believe the window for fraud on the consumer is giant with that kind of policy.

It could be the cost of doing business but I don't think people realize how much an effect shoody return scams have on the bottom line for stores in the end the price we all pay at the register.

Halfcan
06-19-2006, 11:51 PM
Ha, thank you.

I am working on it...I am on a path to get there...lots of great oppurtunities but I am not in a position to pay the bills with it.

So I work at OD...great people...health insurance...they give me time to do the photog thing when I need it.

Thats cool, just keep at it. You have the eye for it. Any jackass can buy a digital camera nowdays and think they are the next Ansel Adams-but the true Photobugs are born with it-and then develop their craft.

Der Flöprer
06-19-2006, 11:56 PM
It could be the cost of doing business but I don't think people realize how much an effect shoody return scams have on the bottom line for stores in the end the price we all pay at the register.



I here what you're saying, the problem I have is this. If it's not returning scams, it's stealing in general. Fact is in the 50's businesses tried to make a modest 10-15% return on their products. In the 21st century, that number has jumped to "as high as dumbasses will pay for shit". That being said we pay for everything, I don't feel sorry for them at all. They will always find a reason to raise prices. People who scam will always find a way to scam. JMHO

Miles
06-19-2006, 11:59 PM
It could be the cost of doing business but I don't think people realize how much an effect shoody return scams have on the bottom line for stores in the end the price we all pay at the register.

Good customer service and readily accepting returns seems like a great idea in principal. Its great customer service to the honest people but seems that it is often exploited by the many more that are not honest. The problem is that you may run off some customers and spread bad word of mouth about a business by pissing off the good and honest customers. Its a tough call.

Baconeater
06-20-2006, 12:03 AM
Absolutely. You mark the products up, there is a cost to doing business. I understand that good customer service has died in 2006. However this is not an unreasonable request. The retailer holds much more clout with a manufacturer and will get their money back. Obviously as stated unconditional only goes as far as operational problems with the product. If you buy an alarm clock and drop kick it into traffic you're s.o.l but I think that is obvious anyway. You have a responsibility to your consumers to provide good working products. If they don't then time to sack up and deal with it. Either by not selling the product anymore, or making a statement to your manufacturer that it is unacceptable. Joe consumer could never accomplish what the people who are really buying the items can. They buy in bulk.
OK, if it's defective it's probably fair, but it's been my experience that if something is defective you usually know it right away.

Der Flöprer
06-20-2006, 12:08 AM
OK, if it's defective it's probably fair, but it's been my experience that if something is defective you usually know it right away.



Which is more than true. There are exceptions though, sometimes shit goes bad in a couple of months. Shame on the manufacturers, they shouldn't be able to make something of low quality figuring people will come back to buy more like it's food. I think it should be subject to in store testing to make sure it is not in proper working fashion. I'm willing to concede that there are scammers and precautions should be taken, but people should have a way of getting their hard earned money back for poorly made shit. Manufacturers are scam artists too sometimes.

Miles
06-20-2006, 12:15 AM
Which is more than true. There are exceptions though, sometimes shit goes bad in a couple of months. Shame on the manufacturers, they shouldn't be able to make something of low quality figuring people will come back to buy more like it's food. I think it should be subject to in store testing to make sure it is not in proper working fashion. I'm willing to concede that there are scammers and precautions should be taken, but people should have a way of getting their hard earned money back for poorly made shit. Manufacturers are scam artists too sometimes.

Shit like in store testing is very unrealistic and would just increase the selling price of the products. There are always going to be defective products no matter how good the manufacture is. Expecting the retailer to bare that burden for an extended amount of time is unreasonable at best.

Valiant
06-20-2006, 01:12 AM
90 days, any condition. As long as it wasn't self imposed. If it's well used, but broken to no fault of the purchaser, the retail store should take it back and return it to the manufacturer. Outside of 90 days, the retailer should have zero responsibility. No exceptions to any part of this rule.


A lot of retailers cannot return damaged items to the manufacture no matter what you have been told.. As for self-imposed, customers make stuff up 95% percent of the time on why they do not want it.. All you have to say is "I do not want this" as long as it is within the return policy ( most places 14-30 days) retailers do not care...

Another thing I have noticed about customers returns, customers do not like bringing back all the parts with the item:AA batteries, strap, memory cards, lenses, remotes, RCA cables, power cords...

Valiant
06-20-2006, 01:18 AM
Absolutely. You mark the products up, there is a cost to doing business. I understand that good customer service has died in 2006. However this is not an unreasonable request. The retailer holds much more clout with a manufacturer and will get their money back. Obviously as stated unconditional only goes as far as operational problems with the product. If you buy an alarm clock and drop kick it into traffic you're s.o.l but I think that is obvious anyway. You have a responsibility to your consumers to provide good working products. If they don't then time to sack up and deal with it. Either by not selling the product anymore, or making a statement to your manufacturer that it is unacceptable. Joe consumer could never accomplish what the people who are really buying the items can. They buy in bulk.

What I do not understand is if the company tells you, you have a 30-day return policy and you agree to it.. Why get mad at the company 3 months down the road if the product goes out??? You still have the manufactures warranty??? You just have to deal with the manufacture and not the buisness... Most retail stores are not in direct contact with manufacturers...

I know the company I work (in KC)for has to send their defective products all the way to Dallas to get worked on, the labor is free the company just has to pay the shipping...

Not trying to butt heads, but there is a very big grey area between what the customer wants and what the manufacturers will give..

Valiant
06-20-2006, 01:22 AM
Which is more than true. There are exceptions though, sometimes shit goes bad in a couple of months. Shame on the manufacturers, they shouldn't be able to make something of low quality figuring people will come back to buy more like it's food. I think it should be subject to in store testing to make sure it is not in proper working fashion. I'm willing to concede that there are scammers and precautions should be taken, but people should have a way of getting their hard earned money back for poorly made shit. Manufacturers are scam artists too sometimes.


Companies make all their items disposable... YOu sell printers there? Look at the price of a new printer compared to the ink??? (which pisses me off that HP changes ink every two years, as the printer technology has not advanced that much)..They make the things to have a short lifespan..

My biggest tell on product not to buy if it has a 90day or less free labor warranty..

Inspector
06-20-2006, 07:26 AM
I'm sure many have been screwed by them, but I have had some extraordinary good service returning different items to Lowes in Independence.

Home Depot is another quite horrifying story. They generally suck.

I am always very honest about the situation.

Lowes = good
Home Depot = bad

penguinz
06-20-2006, 07:30 AM
I'm sure many have been screwed by them, but I have had some extraordinary good service returning different items to Lowes in Independence.

Home Depot is another quite horrifying story. They generally suck.

I am always very honest about the situation.

Lowes = good
Home Depot = badI have never had any issues returning things to Home Depot.

jspchief
06-20-2006, 07:37 AM
Absolutely. You mark the products up, there is a cost to doing business. I understand that good customer service has died in 2006. However this is not an unreasonable request. The retailer holds much more clout with a manufacturer and will get their money back. Obviously as stated unconditional only goes as far as operational problems with the product. If you buy an alarm clock and drop kick it into traffic you're s.o.l but I think that is obvious anyway. You have a responsibility to your consumers to provide good working products. If they don't then time to sack up and deal with it. Either by not selling the product anymore, or making a statement to your manufacturer that it is unacceptable. Joe consumer could never accomplish what the people who are really buying the items can. They buy in bulk.That's ridiculous. You expect the retailer to be selective on the quality of product it sells, but don't hold the customer to the same standard on what it buys? Stores carry cheap crap because consumers want to buy cheap crap. All the retailer is doing giving the customers what they want (or at least what they think they want until they realize that you get what you pay for). What you're suggesting justs cuts into the bottom line for the store, which will result in higher prices for all consumers, just to please the occasional idiot.

I think return policies have to vary with the product being sold. High dollar items should have longer retiurn periods. Things like electronics especially, where most places force you to deal with the manufacturer after X number of days.

My personal opinion is that return policies should give the retailer a lot of discretion. For instance, they should be able to look at an item an determine that's it's in good enough shape to be returned. One item could be a year old, but brand new. The next might be 3 days old, but look like it went through the war.

If there weren't so many crooks and scumbags exploiting return policies, stores wouldn't have to get so tough on them like they have in the last ten years.

Monkeylook4food
06-20-2006, 09:24 AM
I'm sure many have been screwed by them, but I have had some extraordinary good service returning different items to Lowes in Independence.

Home Depot is another quite horrifying story. They generally suck.

I am always very honest about the situation.

Lowes = good
Home Depot = bad
I've had equally positive experiences with both stores and I spend tens of thousands at each anually.

Best Buy definitely sucks.

Der Flöprer
06-20-2006, 11:12 AM
If there weren't so many crooks and scumbags exploiting return policies, stores wouldn't have to get so tough on them like they have in the last ten years.



I agree with this. I also agree with the fact that people should be held accountable for the cheap shit they buy. I guess I should have clarified a dollar amount on my 90 day return policy wish. Anything over $100. I never even thought of that when I posted last night. Returning a pair of $10 shoes with the soles blown out after 2 months is ridiculous at best. To me that is more like stealing. You want decent shoes, shell out the money for them etc. I shop a lot at Walmart, not because of their great prices or whatnot. Rather because I know that if I get something there and it turns out to be unreliable they will refund me up to 3 months on it. That being said, I've only taken something back after 30 days 1 time. I was grateful to be able to return the item after 30 days though, because it was crap, and I didn't know that when I bought it in the first place. Sometimes you go and buy things, and don't use them immediately.

Der Flöprer
06-20-2006, 11:14 AM
What I do not understand is if the company tells you, you have a 30-day return policy and you agree to it.. Why get mad at the company 3 months down the road if the product goes out??? You still have the manufactures warranty??? You just have to deal with the manufacture and not the buisness... Most retail stores are not in direct contact with manufacturers...

I know the company I work (in KC)for has to send their defective products all the way to Dallas to get worked on, the labor is free the company just has to pay the shipping...

Not trying to butt heads, but there is a very big grey area between what the customer wants and what the manufacturers will give..



I don't. If it's a 30 day return policy I wouldn't even try to return it after that. The question was, what do you expect. That's what I expect, if it's not offered I don't shop there as much. Just a personal choice. I agree with this assessment though, if you know the policy, you have nothing to bitch about.

Der Flöprer
06-20-2006, 11:16 AM
Shit like in store testing is very unrealistic and would just increase the selling price of the products. There are always going to be defective products no matter how good the manufacture is. Expecting the retailer to bare that burden for an extended amount of time is unreasonable at best.


Hmm. Increase the selling price by having $7hr employee number 1 to turn around and plug the shit in. I know in some cases it is more cost effective to just take the customers word for it. However making sure the 3 month old alarm clock is really broken wouldn't be too cost or time effective. Let's not make it out like a store having to hire 1 more employee would be that effective on their bottom line. Most employees in those settings are part time anyway.

|Zach|
06-20-2006, 06:11 PM
It does seem like there are a lot of people who don't understand that you generally get what you pay for in this world.

HemiEd
06-20-2006, 07:07 PM
I generally look at returning something as an admission of being a poor buyer.
I recall returning three things in my life, all major purchases. All three were clearly defective, and backed by the seller/manufacturer.
1) Self Propelled rear bagger mower (new item in the 70s) that really was a POS. Montgomery Wards told me to bring it back. It was so heavy it would hardly pull itself and the bag would only fill half way before clogging.
2) John Deere Riding Mower a couple years ago to Home Depot. In less than two weeks, the blade sheeves froze up. They wanted me to pay for the warranty work (labor and pickup) on a $2500 mower! John Deere's web site has a "30 Day Promise" and I took a copy with me to Home Depot.
3) I got a lemon HD Toshiba from Best Buy, it had 5 break downs in a year. It took a while but Toshiba ate it.

I used to work in retail and what people try and return is disgusting.

Hydrae
06-20-2006, 07:09 PM
All I know is that when the dog ate the handle off of my Craftsman screwdriver, Sears replaced without any issue. :)

Mosbonian
06-20-2006, 07:20 PM
A lot of retailers cannot return damaged items to the manufacture no matter what you have been told.....

Not sure which retailer you work for...but I disagree with the above. If the retailer receives the box with even so much as a scratch in it (the box, not the item) then they send it back. That is, unless they have a Discount In Lieu/Destroy in Field policy, which means the retailer is supposed to discard/destroy the product and cannot resell it.

Contrary to what someone else stated, the retailer has the ultimate power...and uses it constantly.


mmaddog
*******

Mosbonian
06-20-2006, 07:23 PM
I'm sure many have been screwed by them, but I have had some extraordinary good service returning different items to Lowes in Independence.

Home Depot is another quite horrifying story. They generally suck.

I am always very honest about the situation.

Lowes = good
Home Depot = bad

JMO...

Lowes= Bad
Home Depot= Even worse

mmaddog
*******

Mosbonian
06-20-2006, 07:27 PM
Most retail stores are not in direct contact with manufacturers...

Not true......

mmaddog
*******

Dartgod
06-20-2006, 07:31 PM
Famous Footwear exchanged a pair of Nike's that I bought a month and a half ago. Although they fit well in the store, they never were comfortable for me after wearing them 4-5 times. I had no box and no receipt and they exchanged them, no questions asked. I was pretty damned impressed.