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Mr. Laz
06-22-2006, 01:41 PM
Congress Agrees to Raise Broadcast-Indecency Fines
Conference to Decide Maximum Penalty

By Frank Ahrens
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, May 20, 2006; Page D01

More than two years after proclaiming outrage over Janet Jackson's briefly exposed breast during the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show, both houses of Congress have passed legislation that would significantly increase indecency fines for television and radio broadcasters.

On Thursday night, the Senate unanimously approved a bill that would increase from $32,500 to $325,000 the maximum fine that the Federal Communications Commission could impose for violating its standards for decency. The House previously passed a version that would raise the maximum fine to $500,000.

"When families are watching a Sunday night football game, they shouldn't have to brace themselves for a televised strip tease," Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) said in a floor statement yesterday, referring to the 2004 Super Bowl. Frist championed the new bill.

The unified congressional push comes as major networks are suing to overturn the government's authority to police the airwaves. The bills will proceed to conference to reconcile the fine amount and then to President Bush, who has said he will sign such legislation.

The FCC does not allow broadcast of "patently offensive" material of a sexual or excretory nature on over-the-air radio and television, such as ABC and Fox television and AM and FM radio stations, from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., when children are most likely to be in the audience.

The agency does not police cable and satellite radio and television programming, such as shows on XM Satellite Radio, MTV, ESPN and HBO. Those would continue to be off-limits under the new legislation. Lobbying by the cable and satellite industries appears to have paid off, as have their education campaigns designed to instruct parents in how to use technology to block offensive channels.

The passage of the Senate bill is a "major victory for families," said L. Brent Bozell III, founder of the Parents Television Council, which has criticized the FCC for being soft on indecency.

Michael K. Powell , when he was FCC chairman, asked Congress for higher fines, saying that current amounts do little to discourage multibillion-dollar broadcast giants from crossing the line.

The exposing of Jackson's breast culminated a contentious year for the agency and Congress, as the two bodies tussled over several incidents of tasteless radio and television broadcasts, including the on-air utterance of the "F-word" by U2 frontman Bono that the agency originally ruled was not indecent, spurring widespread ridicule and criticism.

After the 2004 Super Bowl, the FCC moved swiftly to fine 20 CBS stations the then-maximum fine of $27,500, for a total of $550,000. The Senate and House each passed legislation that would have raised the fines substantially, but both bills stalled.

Last year, Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) led a revival of the House version, fixing the maximum fine at $500,000. The Senate version stalled until Frist picked it up this year and pushed it through.

ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and more than 800 affiliated television stations sued in federal court last month to overturn several FCC indecency rulings proposed in March.

Mr. Laz
06-22-2006, 01:45 PM
we won't raise the fines for dumping toxic waste ... but we multiply the possible fines for indecency on t.v. by 100.



brilliant :thumb:



i guess boobies are more dangerous than toxic waste

jAZ
06-22-2006, 01:48 PM
Congressional Repblicans are ideological frauds. Entirely free markets should rule the day, unless the RRWNJ folks want something regulated and it's election season. Then fuggit all, let's getussomevotes!

chagrin
06-22-2006, 01:52 PM
Congressional Repblicans are ideological frauds. Entirely free markets should rule the day, unless the RRWNJ folks want something regulated and it's election season. Then fuggit all, let's getussomevotes!

I suppose raising money, even through this revolting way, is better than slashing tires of opponents, and having one of your party "favorites" telling illegal immigrants, in a press conference no less, that "you don't need papers, to vote", to get votes

douche

patteeu
06-22-2006, 03:07 PM
Congressional Repblicans are ideological frauds. Entirely free markets should rule the day, unless the RRWNJ folks want something regulated and it's election season. Then fuggit all, let's getussomevotes!

That criticism is fair, but of course there is truth to the converse as well. democrats are very comfortable with regulation with a notable exception of traditional moral beliefs. A pox on both their houses, afaic.

BucEyedPea
06-22-2006, 03:11 PM
That criticism is fair, but of course there is truth to the converse as well. democrats are very comfortable with regulation with a notable exception of traditional moral beliefs. A pox on both their houses, afaic.


Yes, but the frequencies are considered "publically" owned therefore things that are public can be regulated. Wanna see the left flip out? Have those all sold and privatized for a solution. That's the key to freedom...yet they make more and more things public and rail against privatization.

'Hamas' Jenkins
06-22-2006, 03:31 PM
Yes, but the frequencies are considered "publically" owned therefore things that are public can be regulated. Wanna see the left flip out? Have those all sold and privatized for a solution. That's the key to freedom...yet they make more and more things public and rail against privatization.

Because large multinationals owning a disproportionate share of the media outlets in this country has been sooooo beneficial for the integrity and accuracy of the press :rolleyes:

BucEyedPea
06-22-2006, 03:39 PM
Because large multinationals owning a disproportionate share of the media outlets in this country has been sooooo beneficial for the integrity and accuracy of the press :rolleyes:


I don't agree with that either. But here's the thing, sometimes we have to compromise. So if you want it in the public arena then you'll just have to settle for some of the regulation that comes with it. That means someone's standards whether you like or agree with it or not. Get the idea now? Life's a bitch ain't it?

SBK
06-22-2006, 03:47 PM
Because large multinationals owning a disproportionate share of the media outlets in this country has been sooooo beneficial for the integrity and accuracy of the press :rolleyes:

The press hasn't had integrity or accuracy for over 40 years. Don't try to act like this is something new.

'Hamas' Jenkins
06-22-2006, 03:50 PM
Oh, that's right, they lost all their integrity when that bastard Cronkite insinuated that we might not be able to beat an enemy that would rather die than surrender to us...

That sick motherf*cker.

SBK
06-22-2006, 04:08 PM
Oh, that's right, they lost all their integrity when that bastard Cronkite insinuated that we might not be able to beat an enemy that would rather die than surrender to us...

That sick motherf*cker.

They lost their integrity when liberalism and their own personal views got in the way of the 'truth' or even the 'facts'............

irishjayhawk
06-22-2006, 04:26 PM
Another fine example on why we are still "out of touch" in the world.

Logical
06-22-2006, 04:30 PM
we won't raise the fines for dumping toxic waste ... but we multiply the possible fines for indecency on t.v. by 100.



brilliant :thumb:



i guess boobies are more dangerous than toxic waste



Someone please save us from the insanity of the Religious fanatics.

Logical
06-22-2006, 04:31 PM
They lost their integrity when liberalism and their own personal views got in the way of the 'truth' or even the 'facts'............

Gee it appears Cronkite was right, evidently he knew the truth.

burt
06-22-2006, 04:34 PM
we won't raise the fines for dumping toxic waste ... but we multiply the possible fines for indecency on t.v. by 100.



brilliant :thumb:



i guess boobies are more dangerous than toxic waste

Expose me to one or the other and let me be the judge......but I am hoping boobies are easier to find, for you, than toxic waste.....

Logical
06-22-2006, 04:37 PM
Expose me to one or the other and let me be the judge......but I am hoping boobies are easier to find, for you, than toxic waste.....

Granted Janet Jackson's boob was not a pretty sight, but do you think it really would warrant a 325K fine?

Adept Havelock
06-22-2006, 05:42 PM
Granted Janet Jackson's boob was not a pretty sight, but do you think it really would warrant a 325K fine?

Only in a country founded by people so tight-assed the British kicked them out, where some of their descendents still have the same medieval mindset.

Hydrae
06-22-2006, 08:05 PM
we won't raise the fines for dumping toxic waste ... but we multiply the possible fines for indecency on t.v. by 100.



brilliant :thumb:



i guess boobies are more dangerous than toxic waste


Not to nitpick but 32,500 x 100 = 3,250,000. This was only raised 10 times.

Ok, so that was a bit of a nit to pick but still....

Mr. Laz
06-22-2006, 08:40 PM
Not to nitpick but 32,500 x 100 = 3,250,000. This was only raised 10 times.

Ok, so that was a bit of a nit to pick but still....
no problem ... should of paid attention :doh!:






deserve to get slapped around for that one ROFL



suprised someone else hadn't done it already

Valiant
06-22-2006, 10:46 PM
Congress Agrees to Raise Broadcast-Indecency Fines
Conference to Decide Maximum Penalty

By Frank Ahrens
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, May 20, 2006; Page D01

More than two years after proclaiming outrage over Janet Jackson's briefly exposed breast during the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show, both houses of Congress have passed legislation that would significantly increase indecency fines for television and radio broadcasters.

On Thursday night, the Senate unanimously approved a bill that would increase from $32,500 to $325,000 the maximum fine that the Federal Communications Commission could impose for violating its standards for decency. The House previously passed a version that would raise the maximum fine to $500,000.

"When families are watching a Sunday night football game, they shouldn't have to brace themselves for a televised strip tease," Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) said in a floor statement yesterday, referring to the 2004 Super Bowl. Frist championed the new bill.

The unified congressional push comes as major networks are suing to overturn the government's authority to police the airwaves. The bills will proceed to conference to reconcile the fine amount and then to President Bush, who has said he will sign such legislation.

The FCC does not allow broadcast of "patently offensive" material of a sexual or excretory nature on over-the-air radio and television, such as ABC and Fox television and AM and FM radio stations, from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., when children are most likely to be in the audience.

The agency does not police cable and satellite radio and television programming, such as shows on XM Satellite Radio, MTV, ESPN and HBO. Those would continue to be off-limits under the new legislation. Lobbying by the cable and satellite industries appears to have paid off, as have their education campaigns designed to instruct parents in how to use technology to block offensive channels.

The passage of the Senate bill is a "major victory for families," said L. Brent Bozell III, founder of the Parents Television Council, which has criticized the FCC for being soft on indecency.

Michael K. Powell , when he was FCC chairman, asked Congress for higher fines, saying that current amounts do little to discourage multibillion-dollar broadcast giants from crossing the line.

The exposing of Jackson's breast culminated a contentious year for the agency and Congress, as the two bodies tussled over several incidents of tasteless radio and television broadcasts, including the on-air utterance of the "F-word" by U2 frontman Bono that the agency originally ruled was not indecent, spurring widespread ridicule and criticism.

After the 2004 Super Bowl, the FCC moved swiftly to fine 20 CBS stations the then-maximum fine of $27,500, for a total of $550,000. The Senate and House each passed legislation that would have raised the fines substantially, but both bills stalled.

Last year, Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) led a revival of the House version, fixing the maximum fine at $500,000. The Senate version stalled until Frist picked it up this year and pushed it through.

ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and more than 800 affiliated television stations sued in federal court last month to overturn several FCC indecency rulings proposed in March.


I want to see a fine that fines the shit out of any state representative that acts unbecoming of a man of the state...

lets see here:

lieing under oath 1million dollars
adultury 750k
taking bribes 1 million
wasting tax dollars on trips 500k
not showing up for votes 100k
hookers/drugs 750k

We would get out of ****ing debt in ten years..