PDA

View Full Version : Huge Asteroid to Fly Past Earth July 3


Donger
06-27-2006, 12:43 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20060626/sc_space/hugeasteroidtoflypastearthjuly3;_ylt=AugIFftiSw2v93.SLrJoag2s0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTA3ODdxdHBhBHNlYwM5NjQ-

An asteroid possibly as large as a half-mile or more in diameter is rapidly approaching the Earth. There is no need for concern, for no collision is in the offing, but the space rock will make an exceptionally close approach to our planet early on Monday, July 3, passing just beyond the Moon's average distance from Earth.

Astronomers will attempt to get a more accurate assessment of the asteroid's size by “pinging” it with radar.

And skywatchers with good telescopes and some experience just might be able to get a glimpse of this cosmic rock as it streaks rapidly past our planet in the wee hours Monday. The closest approach occurs late Sunday for U.S. West Coast skywatchers.

The asteroid, designated 2004 XP14, was discovered on Dec. 10, 2004 by the Lincoln Laboratory Near Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR), a continuing camera survey to keep watch for asteroids that may pass uncomfortably close to Earth.

Although initially there were concerns that this asteroid might possibly impact Earth later this century and thus merit special monitoring, further analysis of its orbit has since ruled out any such collision, at least in the foreseeable future.

Size not known

Asteroid 2004 XP14 is a member of a class of asteroids known as Apollo, which have Earth-crossing orbits. The name comes from 1862 Apollo, the first asteroid of this group to be discovered. There are now 1,989 known Apollos.

The size of 2004 XP 14 is not precisely known. But based on its brightness, the diameter is believed to be somewhere in the range of 1,345 to 3,018-feet (410 to 920 meters). That's between a quarter mile and just over a half-mile wide.

Due to the proximity of its orbit to Earth [Map] and its estimated size, this object has been classified as a “Potentially Hazardous Asteroid” (PNA) by the Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts. There are currently 783 PNAs.

The latest calculations show that 2004 XP14 will pass closest to Earth at 04:25 UT on July 3 (12:25 a.m. EDT or 9:25 p.m. PDT on July 2). The asteroid's distance from Earth at that moment will be 268,624-miles (432,308 km), or just 1.1 times the Moon's average distance from Earth.

Spotting 2004 XP14 will be a challenge, best accomplished by seasoned observers with moderate-sized telescopes.

On April 13, 2029, observers in Asia and North Africa will have a chance to see another asteroid, but without needing a telescope. Asteroid 99942 Apophis, about 1,000 feet (300 meters) wide, is expected to be visible to the naked eye as it passes within 20,000 miles (32,000 km). Astronomers say an asteroid that large comes that close about once every 1,500 years.

Observing plans

As 2004 XP14 makes its closest approach to Earth, astronomers will attempt to gauge its size and shape by analysis of very high frequency radio waves reflected from its surface.

Such radar measurements of the exact distance and velocity of the asteroid will allow for precise information on its orbit. From this scientists can also discern details of the asteroid's mass, as well as a measurement of its density, which is a very important indicator of its overall composition and internal structure.

Astronomers plan to utilize
NASA's 70-meter (230-foot) diameter Goldstone radar, the largest and most sensitive antenna in its Deep Space Network. Located in California's Mojave Desert, the Goldstone antenna has been used to bounce radio signals off other Near-Earth asteroids many times before, and it is now being readied to “ping” 2004 XP14 on July 3, 4 and 5.

Augmenting the Goldstone observations will be radar observations scheduled at Evpatoria in the Ukraine, commencing several hours prior to the July 3 observations at Goldstone.

Editor's Note: A SPACE.com viewer's guide for 2004 XP14 will be presented in Joe Rao's weekly Night Sky column on Friday, June 30.

Saulbadguy
06-27-2006, 12:47 PM
I'm concerned. It seems the asteroids/meteors/other various flying objects of impending doom we are supposed to be concerned about never materialize. It's only natural this one will obliterate us.

BucEyedPea
06-27-2006, 12:51 PM
I wanted to buy a telescope for my kid and I at Christmas and put it off. :(
Anyone know much about 'em?

Man would an average telescope catch this thing or no?

I'll get one tomorrow.

DaKCMan AP
06-27-2006, 12:54 PM
I'm concerned. It seems the asteroids/meteors/other various flying objects of impending doom we are supposed to be concerned about never materialize. It's only natural this one will obliterate us.

Yeah, but I think it would take one larger than 3/8 of a mile diameter.

DaFace
06-27-2006, 12:54 PM
Due to the proximity of its orbit to Earth [Map] and its estimated size, this object has been classified as a “Potentially Hazardous Asteroid” (PNA) by the Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts. There are currently 783 PNAs.

I wonder how "Potentially Hazardous Asteroid" ends up being abbreviated "PNA." :hmmm:

Phobia
06-27-2006, 12:57 PM
The highly paid pretty person on television can't even accurately predict rain for tomorrow. How is some dweeb with a paper towel tube stuck in his eye so sure this rock won't hit earth on the 3rd?

I'm going to walmart and buying all their drinking water, beans, and duct tape.

Alton deFlat
06-27-2006, 12:58 PM
I wonder how "Potentially Hazardous Asteroid" ends up being abbreviated "PNA." :hmm:

I think that may be a typo.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potentially_hazardous_asteroid

Hydrae
06-27-2006, 12:58 PM
I'm concerned. It seems the asteroids/meteors/other various flying objects of impending doom we are supposed to be concerned about never materialize. It's only natural this one will obliterate us.

December 2012

Donger
06-27-2006, 12:58 PM
I wanted to buy a telescope for my kid and I at Christmas and put it off. :(
Anyone know much about 'em?

Man would an average telescope catch this thing or no?

I'll get one tomorrow.

No.

Donger
06-27-2006, 12:59 PM
I'm concerned. It seems the asteroids/meteors/other various flying objects of impending doom we are supposed to be concerned about never materialize. It's only natural this one will obliterate us.

There's a reason that STS-121 is scheduled for July 1.

*shudder*

Donger
06-27-2006, 01:00 PM
Yeah, but I think it would take one larger than 3/8 of a mile diameter.

F=MA

MOhillbilly
06-27-2006, 01:02 PM
Good. I hope it lands on me.

King_Chief_Fan
06-27-2006, 01:04 PM
I'm concerned. It seems the asteroids/meteors/other various flying objects of impending doom we are supposed to be concerned about never materialize. It's only natural this one will obliterate us.

Time to send up Bruce Willis and Ben Aflack to destroy this thing

Phobia
06-27-2006, 01:06 PM
Has anybody heard from Bruce Willis since he and Aflack destroyed the last asteroid?

DaKCMan AP
06-27-2006, 01:07 PM
F=MA

Ok, Newton. I still think a larger one would be needed to "obliterate us".

DaKCMan AP
06-27-2006, 01:09 PM
Has anybody heard from Bruce Willis since he and Aflack destroyed the last asteroid?

I think he's been spending time with Lohan & other teenage actresses.

Donger
06-27-2006, 01:10 PM
Ok, Newton. I still think a larger one would be needed to "obliterate us".

Size doesn't matter.

Fish
06-27-2006, 01:11 PM
I wanted to buy a telescope for my kid and I at Christmas and put it off. :(
Anyone know much about 'em?

Man would an average telescope catch this thing or no?

I'll get one tomorrow.

An average telescope would catch it.... if you knew exactly when and where to look. If you have no experience with telescopes or astronomy in general, I doubt you'll see much, if anything. This isn't really one of those opportunities that would be benificial to run out and buy a telescope....

If you're serious about getting a good telescope for your kid, I'd do some research first. The $50 versions you would find at Walmart, aren't worth it... and you can easily build a version that would be much better. Another thing to think about is where would you be viewing the sky from. If you're in the middle of a city, you're never going to see anything unless you drive outside of town. The glow of the city lights ruins most viewing inside city limits.

I'm not trying to talk you out of anything, but it happens to often that people buy a cheap telescope without thinking through how it will be used.... and it ends up as another cheap telescope in the garage sale bin.... But if you do it right, you can give your child a wonderful hobby that will last a long time.....

ct
06-27-2006, 01:12 PM
Has anybody heard from Bruce Willis since he and Aflack destroyed the last asteroid?

I thought Bruce was dead? I heard Ashton Cutcher replaced him.

DaKCMan AP
06-27-2006, 01:13 PM
Size doesn't matter.

And you believed her?

Rausch
06-27-2006, 01:15 PM
Ok, Newton. I still think a larger one would be needed to "obliterate us".

Depends on the speed and angle of impact.

Donger
06-27-2006, 01:16 PM
And you believed her?

ROFL

Karl: Sir, I'm retired navy, I know all about classified. But one more thing. The person who finds her gets to name her right?

Dan: Yes, yes that's right, that's right.

Karl: I wanna name her Dottie after my wife. She's a vicious life-sucking bitch from which there is no escape.

Spicy McHaggis
06-27-2006, 01:16 PM
I think he's been spending time with Lohan & other teenage actresses.

When other guys turn 50 they just get a convertible...

4th and Long
06-27-2006, 01:25 PM
I wanted to buy a telescope for my kid and I at Christmas and put it off. :(
Anyone know much about 'em?

Man would an average telescope catch this thing or no?

I'll get one tomorrow.
Sucks to be you. I have my telescope all set up.

Asteroid 2004 XP14 is large enough (600 meters wide) and bright enough (11th magnitude) to see through backyard telescopes as it races across the star-fields of the Milky Way.

StcChief
06-27-2006, 01:29 PM
As long as it flies by.....

Phobia
06-27-2006, 01:29 PM
I think he's been spending time with Lohan & other teenage actresses.
Turnabout is fair play.

FAX
06-27-2006, 01:33 PM
Ode To An Asteroid.

By FAX

Oh, giant rock up in the sky
I hope that you will just fly by.
But if you don't and strike the earth
This is my wish for what it's worth;

Please break up into tiny bits
And strike my ex upon her tits.
And if she's still with that dumb punk
Please smack him with a great big chunk.

Knock him silly, send him reeling,
Put a hole right through his ceiling.
A smackdown would be entertaining
If you have some clumps remaining.

And fiery stones would be the best,
Right on his head. That's my request.
For he spends my alimony
But you can fix that 'cause you're stony.

And you fly at awesome speed
And that's exactly what I need.
So help me bid that bitch goodbye
Oh, giant rock up in the sky.

FAX

BucEyedPea
06-27-2006, 01:34 PM
Sucks to be you. I have my telescope all set up.

Asteroid 2004 XP14 is large enough (600 meters wide) and bright enough (11th magnitude) to see through backyard telescopes as it races across the star-fields of the Milky Way.
Really?
Donger said no.

Where can I pick one up?
Relative costs?

BucEyedPea
06-27-2006, 01:35 PM
Ode To An Asteroid.

By FAX

Oh, giant rock up in the sky
I hope that you will just fly by.
But if you don't and strike the earth
This is my wish for what it's worth;

Please break up into tiny bits
And give my ex a bunch of hits.
And if she's still with that dumb punk
Please smack him with a great big chunk.

Knock him silly, send him reeling,
Put a hole right through their ceiling.
A smackdown would be entertaining
If you have some clumps remaining.

And fiery stones would be the best,
Right on his head. That's my request.
'Cause he spends all my alimony
But you can fix that 'cause you're stony.

And you fly at awesome speed
And that's exactly what I need.
So help me bid that bitch goodbye
Oh, giant rock up in the sky.

FAX

Love it! ROFL
Gee! Hope my ex don't use it on me.
He being a musician too.

Rain Man
06-27-2006, 01:38 PM
I wonder how "Potentially Hazardous Asteroid" ends up being abbreviated "PNA." :hmmm:

The head of NASA had a cleft palate.

Rain Man
06-27-2006, 01:40 PM
Not to alarm anyone, but I've always thought that a true alien spaceship wouldn't necessarily be gleaming metal and angles and stuff, but would actually be a hollowed-out asteroid. It's much more efficient.

Rooster
06-27-2006, 01:42 PM
Ode To An Asteroid.

By FAX

Oh, giant rock up in the sky
I hope that you will just fly by.
But if you don't and strike the earth
This is my wish for what it's worth;

Please break up into tiny bits
And give my ex a bunch of hits.
And if she's still with that dumb punk
Please smack him with a great big chunk.

Knock him silly, send him reeling,
Put a hole right through their ceiling.
A smackdown would be entertaining
If you have some clumps remaining.

And fiery stones would be the best,
Right on his head. That's my request.
'Cause he spends all my alimony
But you can fix that 'cause you're stony.

And you fly at awesome speed
And that's exactly what I need.
So help me bid that bitch goodbye
Oh, giant rock up in the sky.

FAX

ROFL ROFL ROFL

Alton deFlat
06-27-2006, 01:54 PM
Not to alarm anyone, but I've always thought that a true alien spaceship wouldn't necessarily be gleaming metal and angles and stuff, but would actually be a hollowed-out asteroid. It's much more efficient.

Like in the original "War of the Worlds".

BucEyedPea
06-27-2006, 01:57 PM
"You don't know a woman until you've met her in court."
- Norman Mailer

OMG! ROFL

4th and Long
06-27-2006, 02:07 PM
Really?
No. Not really. I just type things for fun.

YES! REALLY!
Donger said no.
You're still new here so I'll let this one pass. You'll learn, eventually.
Where can I pick one up?
Dunno. Mine was a gift. Google it.
Relative costs?
For a good one? Expensive.

Near close approach around 4h44m UT July 3, this 600-meter/yard diameter asteroid passes only 268,873 miles from the Earth, only 1.1 times the distance to the moon away. Peaking at visual magnitude 11.1 four hours later, users of telescopes of 6 inches (15cm) or larger can enjoy observing a rare celestial treat. At time of close approach, 2004 XP14 races along at 8.323 degrees per hour, or a mean lunar diameter every four minutes. Such a rapid speed results in direct motion becoming visible, second by second. Just as naked eye Earth satellites are seen crossing the sky, 2004 XP14 will both amaze and challenge the observer, both visually and those taking images. Visual observing this event presents a sight very few have seen in the eyepiece.

Moving at so fast a speed, the observer would hardly be able to spot the field of view, note the exact time, and then move their eyes to the spot where the asteroid is expected. It is perhaps possible to chase down this asteroid by following the expected path, but this will prove very difficult indeed.

SKY MAP
http://www.spaceweather.com/images2006/03jul06/skymap_north.gif

Donger
06-27-2006, 02:10 PM
You're still new here so I'll let this one pass. You'll learn, eventually.


ROFL

Maybe I'm wrong, but I think by 'average,' she's talking about running out to Radio Shack, buying one of their 'scopes and hoping to see this rock.

Rooster
06-27-2006, 02:14 PM
Not to alarm anyone, but I've always thought that a true alien spaceship wouldn't necessarily be gleaming metal and angles and stuff, but would actually be a hollowed-out asteroid. It's much more efficient.

:hmmm: The Trojan Horse approach. Those tricky little bastards. :)

munkey
06-27-2006, 02:22 PM
Near close approach around 4h44m UT July 3, this 600-meter/yard diameter asteroid passes only 268,873 miles from the Earth, only 1.1 times the distance to the moon away. Peaking at visual magnitude 11.1 four hours later, users of telescopes of 6 inches (15cm) or larger can enjoy observing a rare celestial treat. At time of close approach, 2004 XP14 races along at 8.323 degrees per hour, or a mean lunar diameter every four minutes. Such a rapid speed results in direct motion becoming visible, second by second. Just as naked eye Earth satellites are seen crossing the sky, 2004 XP14 will both amaze and challenge the observer, both visually and those taking images. Visual observing this event presents a sight very few have seen in the eyepiece.

Moving at so fast a speed, the observer would hardly be able to spot the field of view, note the exact time, and then move their eyes to the spot where the asteroid is expected. It is perhaps possible to chase down this asteroid by following the expected path, but this will prove very difficult indeed.

SKY MAP
http://www.spaceweather.com/images2006/03jul06/skymap_north.gif

So there's no chance of catching it with the naked eye?

Calcountry
06-27-2006, 02:24 PM
The highly paid pretty person on television can't even accurately predict rain for tomorrow. How is some dweeb with a paper towel tube stuck in his eye so sure this rock won't hit earth on the 3rd?

I'm going to walmart and buying all their drinking water, beans, and duct tape.Don't forget the tuna.

Inspector
06-27-2006, 02:32 PM
Depends on the speed and angle of impact.

You are talking about an asteroid, right?

4th and Long
06-27-2006, 02:48 PM
ROFL

Maybe I'm wrong, but I think by 'average,' she's talking about running out to Radio Shack, buying one of their 'scopes and hoping to see this rock.
Given the close distance of this asteroid, one of those cheap scopes you get from Radio Shack or Wal Mart might actually do the trick. Now, if she wants to use it to see Mars or (insert Uranus joke here) she'll need a better scope. :D

4th and Long
06-27-2006, 02:48 PM
So there's no chance of catching it with the naked eye?
:shake:

BucEyedPea
06-27-2006, 02:55 PM
No. Not really. I just type things for fun.

Well yeah...you even told me that once.

Still a wiseassologist aren't ya?

For a good one? Expensive.

The had a good one at National Geographic for close to $200 but discontinued it around Xmas. I wanted that one. It seemed just right for my needs and a kids. I would never buy at WalMart....and I have Googled and looked at some on the net but frankly I am out of my league in this subject. Don't even know what it is that I'm lookin' at or the scientific jargon attached.

Donger
06-27-2006, 03:03 PM
Given the close distance of this asteroid, one of those cheap scopes you get from Radio Shack or Wal Mart might actually do the trick. Now, if she wants to use it to see Mars or (insert Uranus joke here) she'll need a better scope. :D

IF she knew where to look, of course. I'm going to try with my boy's new Meade, but I doubt it.

Less than a mile diameter.
Distance of 250,000+ miles.
Moving at 17,000+ mph.

Not likely, but it'll be fun to try! My son loves checking out the Moon with his scope.

jiveturkey
06-27-2006, 03:21 PM
My moon just dropped a huge rock into the toilet ocean.

If this rock is anything like the one I just pinched off then you'll probably be able to smell it as it flies by.

Fat Elvis
06-27-2006, 04:00 PM
Ode To An Asteroid.

By FAX

Oh, giant rock up in the sky
I hope that you will just fly by.
But if you don't and strike the earth
This is my wish for what it's worth;

Please break up into tiny bits
And give my ex a bunch of hits.
And if she's still with that dumb punk
Please smack him with a great big chunk.

Knock him silly, send him reeling,
Put a hole right through their ceiling.
A smackdown would be entertaining
If you have some clumps remaining.

And fiery stones would be the best,
Right on his head. That's my request.
'Cause he spends all my alimony
But you can fix that 'cause you're stony.

And you fly at awesome speed
And that's exactly what I need.
So help me bid that bitch goodbye
Oh, giant rock up in the sky.

FAX

Someone needs to be collecting these gems and publishing them.

BucEyedPea
06-27-2006, 04:52 PM
hey Donger and 4th...whatta 'bout this one:


Orion® AstroView™ 80mm EQ Refractor (http://www.telescope.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID=106597&itemType=PRODUCT&RS=1&keyword=)


They're so busy with calls that they have to call back to answer my questions.
Bear in mind I would like to do more with this than just this asteroid....I would like to see Uranus or Jupitor too. Bearing in mind my kid will use it a few times and lose interest. At that point I'll probably lose interest too. Heh!

Chiefs_Fan_n_64081
06-27-2006, 05:39 PM
I have been a backyard astronomer since I was 8 years old, and I think most people would be surprised at the frequency of episodes in which Earth experiences near misses.
In the average year, dozens of large objects come into close proximity with our planet.
The sorry truth of the matter is that should a "planet killer" venture our way we will have little to no warning until it is right on top of us.

In fact, I have often wondered about what kind of secret operations are regularly conducted by our goverment in relation to this type of threat.

Donger
06-27-2006, 05:43 PM
I have been a backyard astronomer since I was 8 years old, and I think most people would be surprised at the frequency of episodes in which Earth experiences near misses.
In the average year, dozens of large objects come into close proximity with our planet.
The sorry truth of the matter is that should a "planet killer" venture our way we will have little to no warning until it is right on top of us.

In fact, I have often wondered about what kind of secret operations are regularly conducted by our goverment in relation to this type of threat.

"Spaceguard" is the name for these loosely affiliated programs, some of which receive NASA funding to meet a U.S. Congressional requirement to detect 90% of near-earth asteroids over 1 km diameter by 2008. A 2003 NASA study of a follow-on program suggests spending US$250-450 million to detect 90% of all near-earth asteroids 140 metres and larger by 2028.

Adept Havelock
06-27-2006, 05:58 PM
"Spaceguard" is the name for these loosely affiliated programs, some of which receive NASA funding to meet a U.S. Congressional requirement to detect 90% of near-earth asteroids over 1 km diameter by 2008. A 2003 NASA study of a follow-on program suggests spending US$250-450 million to detect 90% of all near-earth asteroids 140 metres and larger by 2028.

Truman: Our budget only covers about two percent of the sky, and with all due respect Mr. President, it's a big-assed sky.

Feh. Deep Impact was a better film, right up until the nonsense where Frodo and Joan of Arc outran the tidal wave.

Adept Havelock
06-27-2006, 06:16 PM
Also, just because Telescopes made me think of it:


In Carl Sagan's "Contact" (much better than the film), Ellie Arroway, for her PhD works out how to build and use a "Ruby Maser" (a device that can enhance a radio telescope) to detect three-degree blackbody background radiation--the remnant in the radio spectrum of the Big Bang.

"Let's see if I've got this right," she would say to herself. "I've taken an inert gas that's in the air, made it into a liquid, put some impurities into a ruby, attached a magnet, and detected the fires of creation".

Alchemy? Sure sounds like it....

Just goes to show Clarke was right, any sufficently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Then there's Niven's corrolary:
Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficently advanced. ;)

FAX
06-28-2006, 12:32 AM
... Then there's Niven's corrolary:
Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficently advanced. ;)

Then there's David Niven's corrolary, Mr. Adept Havelock.

Any gentleman's advanced technology is always sufficiently distinguished.

FAX

Ultra Peanut
06-28-2006, 01:21 AM
NO! GOD, NO!

Ultra Peanut
06-28-2006, 01:24 AM
Have you seen this man?

http://random-m.com/images/1364150406_nightofthecomet_01.jpg

If so, RUN BITCH!