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Calcountry
07-22-2006, 06:13 PM
I would appreciate any feedback my fellow Planateers may have in regards to cutting the strings on my lappy and going wireless.

Clearwire?
Verizon?
Sprint?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Nightwish
07-22-2006, 06:26 PM
There are advantages and disadvantages to signing up with a wireless service provider like Sprint or Verizon. On the pro side, you can get access from a lot more places than if you just went with regular wi-fi (you can pretty much connect anywhere you can get a cellular signal, as long as its in the wireless coverage area). On the con side, it's still pretty new and the hardware you'll need for it, unless you've got a brand new laptop that's already got it built in (and the regular built-in hardware on older laptops won't work, from what I'm told), is pretty expensive, as is the package itself. I checked with Sprint back during the spring to see how much it would cost, and they told me the monthly package would run about $80, and the special wireless card that you'll have to buy (the regular Wireless-B adapters you can get at Wal Mart won't work) starts at about $150. Those costs may have come down since then, though. Also, still being new, that kind of service is only available in limited areas. When I checked with Sprint, they didn't have it available in St. Louis yet, but were planning to have it here by fall. I don't know about KC.

Calcountry
07-24-2006, 06:36 PM
There are advantages and disadvantages to signing up with a wireless service provider like Sprint or Verizon. On the pro side, you can get access from a lot more places than if you just went with regular wi-fi (you can pretty much connect anywhere you can get a cellular signal, as long as its in the wireless coverage area). On the con side, it's still pretty new and the hardware you'll need for it, unless you've got a brand new laptop that's already got it built in (and the regular built-in hardware on older laptops won't work, from what I'm told), is pretty expensive, as is the package itself. I checked with Sprint back during the spring to see how much it would cost, and they told me the monthly package would run about $80, and the special wireless card that you'll have to buy (the regular Wireless-B adapters you can get at Wal Mart won't work) starts at about $150. Those costs may have come down since then, though. Also, still being new, that kind of service is only available in limited areas. When I checked with Sprint, they didn't have it available in St. Louis yet, but were planning to have it here by fall. I don't know about KC.Thanks for your thoughtful post. 24 people looked at it, and only one posted. I can see how much I am loved here.

My problem, is that my time is spread over 3 locations, and I have hardwired broadband at 2 of them. I am simply getting sick of paying 2 bills, and don't want a third. If I could rely on a wireless hookup to provide access at all 3 locations, with just one dink every month, I could achive in excess of 100 bucks a month in synergies by dropping my hardlines(I have a cell phone for my phone calls).

Just wanted to stick my toe in the water before I dove in head first. Thanks to all you technically savvy planeteers for all your advice, I really appreciated it.

Donger
07-24-2006, 06:54 PM
Thanks for your thoughtful post. 24 people looked at it, and only one posted. I can see how much I am loved here.

My problem, is that my time is spread over 3 locations, and I have hardwired broadband at 2 of them. I am simply getting sick of paying 2 bills, and don't want a third. If I could rely on a wireless hookup to provide access at all 3 locations, with just one dink every month, I could achive in excess of 100 bucks a month in synergies by dropping my hardlines(I have a cell phone for my phone calls).

Just wanted to stick my toe in the water before I dove in head first. Thanks to all you technically savvy planeteers for all your advice, I really appreciated it.

If you are already a Sprint business customer, you can get their wireless broadband unlimited data access for $59.99/month and the card for $49.99. On the braodband network, they claim speeds of 400 to 700 Kbps with peak rates up to 2 Mbps in Mobile Broadband coverage areas and at average speeds of 40-70 Kbps with peak rates up to 144 Kbps on the Sprint Nationwide PCS Network.

Here's the map of the KC metro. Not sure where you are in Cali. http://www.sprint.com/business/products/products/evdoCoverage2.jsp?map=KansasCity_MO&mrkt=Kansas%20City,%20Mo

So, in the PCS areas, speeds range from decent dial-up speeds to double dial-up. 500kbps would be pretty cool.

I'm thinking of ditching my Treo 650 and just doing this anyway.

Lzen
07-25-2006, 09:22 AM
Thanks for your thoughtful post. 24 people looked at it, and only one posted. I can see how much I am loved here.

A lot of people are probably like me. I don't know much about this technology. I just looked at this thread hoping to learn a little about it. And I did learn some things. :thumb:

Rain Man
07-25-2006, 12:09 PM
I got Verizon's Broadband last month and love it. It's about $60 a month, and it's not real broadband speed, but it's reasonable. The key, though, is simplicity and reliability. All I did was get the little card/antenna thingie, install some softward, and voila! Internet in my backyard, any restaurant, or any park bench. It works great.

I should note too that my laptop is at least three years old. It was a very upper-end machine when I bought it, but it's still three years old, and I didn't need anything special other than the little card/antenna thingie. The retail price on that was $229, but I got it for free when I signed up for the service as part of some special promotion.

I'm not going back to wired.

the Talking Can
07-25-2006, 02:35 PM
ok, asking a dumb question: this type of service would provide broadband in my home and anywhere I go that they have a signal, correct?

I would no longer need a "land line" at home.

My only apprehension about going wireless (I'm considering it as well, as I contemplate the merits of a laptop vs. desktop) is the amount of dropped signals. Granted, I'm always "stealing" it so my connections aren't the best, but there seems to be a lot of volatility in the signal strength...which would quickly piss me off if I were paying for it.

Donger
07-25-2006, 02:39 PM
ok, asking a dumb question: this type of service would provide broadband in my home and anywhere I go that they have a signal, correct?

I would no longer need a "land line" at home.

My only apprehension about going wireless (I'm considering it as well, as I contemplate the merits of a laptop vs. desktop) is the amount of dropped signals. Granted, I'm always "stealing" it so my connections aren't the best, but there seems to be a lot of volatility in the signal strength...which would quickly piss me off if I were paying for it.

Anywhere they have either PCS or broadband coverage, yes. This isn't Wi-Fi (802.11a/b/g).

the Talking Can
07-25-2006, 02:51 PM
Anywhere they have either PCS or broadband coverage, yes. This isn't Wi-Fi (802.11a/b/g).

ahhh...I wasn't making the distinction....thank you

Rain Man
07-27-2006, 11:59 AM
ok, asking a dumb question: this type of service would provide broadband in my home and anywhere I go that they have a signal, correct?

I would no longer need a "land line" at home.

My only apprehension about going wireless (I'm considering it as well, as I contemplate the merits of a laptop vs. desktop) is the amount of dropped signals. Granted, I'm always "stealing" it so my connections aren't the best, but there seems to be a lot of volatility in the signal strength...which would quickly piss me off if I were paying for it.

I've had the Verizon service for about six weeks now, and have only been dropped twice. Once I was able to reconnect immediately, and the other time I had to go to their backup service, which worked fine. With the main connection, you also get a connection to a slower backup service.

Count Zarth
07-27-2006, 12:48 PM
Wait...if you have this, you can connect from almost anywhere, not just your home?

Rain Man
07-27-2006, 12:57 PM
Wait...if you have this, you can connect from almost anywhere, not just your home?

Yeah. Anywhere you can get a cell phone signal.

Donger
07-27-2006, 01:03 PM
Yeah. Anywhere you can get a cell phone signal.

Not to be nit-picky, but that's not completely accurate. In the case of Sprint (and I suspect Verizon), you can't access the service in analog-only areas.

The coverage is very good in metro areas and along interstates, etc, since that is where they focus the broadband and PCS coverage.

Calcountry
07-27-2006, 01:57 PM
I've had the Verizon service for about six weeks now, and have only been dropped twice. Once I was able to reconnect immediately, and the other time I had to go to their backup service, which worked fine. With the main connection, you also get a connection to a slower backup service.O.K., this is what I was looking for, thanks for your input.

My laptop is new, less than a year, state of the art Pentium II Chip, wi fi ready, and a card slot for the mobile broadband.

Currently, I am paying for DSL at 2 different locations, and am frequently at a third location, affectionately known as "the farm", that won't have a phoneline. Of course, the need for the net is omnipresent, so I was hopping I can take my net with me for less money than the 2 landlines with DSL I could eliminate.

Reliability is the key issue. It would absolutely suck baows if you had as much trouble getting on the net as you do logging onto Chiefs Planet.

Calcountry
07-27-2006, 02:00 PM
Wait...if you have this, you can connect from almost anywhere, not just your home?Yeah, I know this, but I still like to do most of my surfing at home, and not at the beach.

unlurking
07-27-2006, 02:36 PM
Might read this before you jump...

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060727-7365.html

Verizon's popular EVDO Internet service offers "unlimited" usage to customers, so long as they don't download music, watch video clips, use VoIP, share files, grab game demos, or post webcam shots.

Nightwish
07-27-2006, 05:48 PM
O.K., this is what I was looking for, thanks for your input.

My laptop is new, less than a year, state of the art Pentium II Chip, wi fi ready, and a card slot for the mobile broadband.

Currently, I am paying for DSL at 2 different locations, and am frequently at a third location, affectionately known as "the farm", that won't have a phoneline. Of course, the need for the net is omnipresent, so I was hopping I can take my net with me for less money than the 2 landlines with DSL I could eliminate.

Reliability is the key issue. It would absolutely suck baows if you had as much trouble getting on the net as you do logging onto Chiefs Planet.
From what I understand, there is also a way you can connect to the internet via a connection between your laptop and your cellphone, providing that you have available data ports on both devices, and the proper data cable. It's a lot cheaper than subscribing to broadband wireless service, and the needed equipment is only a few dollars, but the process of doing it is a bit more complicated (I don't know how to do it, I've only read about it), and the speeds, from what I hear, leave a lot to be desired.

Donger
07-27-2006, 06:31 PM
From what I understand, there is also a way you can connect to the internet via a connection between your laptop and your cellphone, providing that you have available data ports on both devices, and the proper data cable. It's a lot cheaper than subscribing to broadband wireless service, and the needed equipment is only a few dollars, but the process of doing it is a bit more complicated (I don't know how to do it, I've only read about it), and the speeds, from what I hear, leave a lot to be desired.

Do NOT do this. One, the cables are usually quite pricey. Two, the speeds are crap. 9.6 kbps was the max on Sprint PCS coverage and it dropped constantly.

Maybe that's changed, but I doubt it.

unlurking
07-27-2006, 06:43 PM
...My laptop is new, less than a year, state of the art Pentium II Chip...

umm, huh?

SLAG
07-27-2006, 10:18 PM
From what I understand, there is also a way you can connect to the internet via a connection between your laptop and your cellphone, providing that you have available data ports on both devices, and the proper data cable. It's a lot cheaper than subscribing to broadband wireless service, and the needed equipment is only a few dollars, but the process of doing it is a bit more complicated (I don't know how to do it, I've only read about it), and the speeds, from what I hear, leave a lot to be desired.


Do NOT do this. One, the cables are usually quite pricey. Two, the speeds are crap. 9.6 kbps was the max on Sprint PCS coverage and it dropped constantly.

Well im about to do this Temporarly to save some money during my move to my new house-

Im cancelling cable tommrow and will be getting DSL at the new house- but not for about a month-

I have my Cell phone service through Nextel and I get Unlimited Packet Data Included in my $15 MMS plan-

I just use the $30 USB cable and type in s=2 in the Phone # spot and im on.,..

I get about a constant 56k Speed with bursts up to 100k -

The bursts come from using nextel's WiDEN Technogly still slow but faster than strick iDEN packet data-

any way just my 2 cents

SLAG
07-29-2006, 06:03 PM
Looks as if I will not have to use the Nextel as a Modem for now... there is a nice unsecured wireless network within range.. :thumb:

Rain Man
07-30-2006, 08:23 PM
Not to be nit-picky, but that's not completely accurate. In the case of Sprint (and I suspect Verizon), you can't access the service in analog-only areas.

The coverage is very good in metro areas and along interstates, etc, since that is where they focus the broadband and PCS coverage.

That may be more of an issue with Sprint. I used to have them, and their coverage in rural areas was abominable. Outside any large metro area, I either had to go analog or (more likely) go without.

With Verizon, I was able to get a nice strong signal in Breckenridge, Colorado, a couple of weeks ago, which is a pretty small town. I was impressed. With Sprint, there's no way I would've picked up anything.