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Jenson71
08-17-2006, 04:05 PM
I'm older than that now...

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Gentlemen, I'll be going to college tomorrow. Monday will be my first class. I'm pretty excited. I know getting advice from people who have experience is a good idea, so I'm asking, what can you give me, that I can take as I start college, and not just in college, but in life, in general?

Count Zarth
08-17-2006, 04:06 PM
Go to class. Above all else. GO TO CLASS.

Jenson71
08-17-2006, 04:08 PM
Go to class. Above all else. GO TO CLASS.

This sounds like solid advice, sir. I will write it down in my agenda.

hawkchief
08-17-2006, 04:11 PM
Focus now on how you would like to spend the rest of your life. Key to that is decide what you would really like to spend your days doing, and educate yourself to do it. Sounds easy, but its not for most. If you are unsure, as many are at your age, get a general business degree, or a degree that will give you flexibility later in life to try different career paths. Best of luck - and have fun!

Calcountry
08-17-2006, 04:12 PM
Well, there are a lot of parameters that you haven't divluged yet, like, are you living at home and commuting, dorm, apartment?

What college are you going to?

trndobrd
08-17-2006, 04:12 PM
It sounds silly, but going to class is generally more important than studying.

If you are in class, you are getting the information first person and can ask questions. Your instructor will see you and be willing to help.

As a former TA, I would always be suprised by the number of students who never showed up to class, then two weeks before the end of the semester wanted me to make extra time to help them study. I always did of course, 6:30-7:30am on Monday morning.

Even if you are hung over, stoned or drunk...get to class.

Jenson71
08-17-2006, 04:15 PM
I'm going to, and living at (in a dorm), the University of Northern Iowa. I am a History major, and plan on attending graduate school at a place I am uncertain of yet.

ChiefsCountry
08-17-2006, 04:22 PM
Go to class.

But in all honesty college isn't so much about learning book stuff, its other lessons in life that will make more of a difference.

BucEyedPea
08-17-2006, 04:23 PM
It sounds silly, but going to class is generally more important than studying.

If you are in class, you are getting the information first person and can ask questions. Your instructor will see you and be willing to help.

As a former TA, I would always be suprised by the number of students who never showed up to class, then two weeks before the end of the semester wanted me to make extra time to help them study. I always did of course, 6:30-7:30am on Monday morning.

Even if you are hung over, stoned or drunk...get to class.

Interesting, I am now being told to mark down students not showing up.
But the one's that don't show don't bother to study either, that I can assure you.

Jenson,
Show up, do the reading and study. Manage your time well.
That's all I can say.

Rain Man
08-17-2006, 04:34 PM
1. Don't skip class. You're paying to learn. Many people think they're just paying for a degree, and then they get humbled when they get out into the real world. Having a degree will get you an interview and maybe even a job (unless it's a history degree), but being knowledgeable will keep that job and get you a career.

2. The first semester is the hardest, for a bunch of reasons.

3. Take the courses you want to take. Don't get pressured by anyone who says, "You really should take this course."

4. Ask bright, motivated upperclassmen which professors to target for classes. You want professors who like to teach, even if they're harder. The others are just wasting your time and money.

5. Don't be afraid to change majors, but don't do it rashly, either.

6. Don't do your homework in a group. All you'll end up doing is copying off the fastest person and you won't learn anything.

7. The most important thing I learned in college was not a particular fact or skill, but rather how to think and problem-solve.

8. Don't take Dr. Nelson for aerothermochemistry.

9. Don't get caught up with the partying and drinking crowd in your freshman year. Most of them will drop out before the year is up, and don't let them take you with them. If you feel a compelling need to get drunk, there's plenty of time to do that when you're a junior and senior.

10. If you approach every smoking hot coed that you see and ask her if she'll do nasty things with you, most of them will be disgusted with you and hate you for the rest of college, but a couple will probably say yes. It's a numbers game, so do what you think is appropriate.

Rain Man
08-17-2006, 04:35 PM
I'm going to, and living at (in a dorm), the University of Northern Iowa. I am a History major, and plan on attending graduate school at a place I am uncertain of yet.

Oh, and don't go to graduate school straight from undergrad school. It's a lot more meaningful and valuable if you enter graduate school with a few years of the real world under your belt.

Calcountry
08-17-2006, 04:36 PM
As a former TA, I would always be suprised by the number of students who never showed up to class, then two weeks before the end of the semester wanted me to make extra time to help them study. I always did of course, 6:30-7:30am on Monday morning.
.I use to get people in my office the day before midterm and ask rudimentary questions about the subject at hand.

Econ 1A. I would answer a question and use a term like complimentary good to answer the question, and then they would say, "what is that"?

Oh boy.

Then I would explain that, and they would say, "Do you think it will be on the test"? Oh boy.

Then we, the professor and I, would take the 100+ exams and make a scatter graph to plot standard deviations. It was his class, and this is how he wanted to "cut" the grades.

This fool that was asking me these questions was a statistical anomaly to the bottom side of the curve. We had to throw her score out, it was insignificantly below the lowest other cluster of phugtards taking the test.

I mean, when the lowest D was like 52% and a couple of F's were around 45and 42, this Chick was like the Bob Barker Babe, coming in at a whopping 21%. Of course, she had nice jugs, so I was happy to spend as much time as she wanted answering her questions even though the info rattled around in the vacuous cavern that usually held a brain.

ChiTown
08-17-2006, 04:42 PM
Here's my bit of advice.

Soak up every moment of that college experience. You get one legit 4-5 year period in your life to do it right. Don't short change it. Study hard, challenge yourself, party hard, have fun, and stay off the sidelines and get into the game. The next 4-5 years of your life will blow by you in a NewYork minute. Leave your regrets at home and grab ahold of the opportunity. You can apply much of that to the next 60 years of your life as well.

I wish you luck and success.

vailpass
08-17-2006, 04:44 PM
#1: maintain your grades.

Stay out of Zsavooz, Shags, Voodoo Lounge, and H2o unless you want to party with friends and get laid.

It doesn't matter whether or not she is on the pill: wear a condom each and every time you have sex. Please. Seriously.

Be open and honest with yor parents or other adults you trust about the feelings you are having as you strike out on your own. Talking to them about your fears, worries, hopes, dreams will help you more than you can imagine.

Be yourself, do your own thing, and don't worry about what anyone thinks of you. You will soon have a solid group of real friends.

Don't hide it, divide it.

DJay23
08-17-2006, 04:46 PM
From my own personal experience:

-Realize that no matter how "smart" you were in high school and what great grades you got, you have to work hard at it in college. If you understand this from day 1 it might help your final GPA if that's important to you.

-Also realize that most of the classes your first 2 years generally suck and are foundation courses. I've known several people who didn't realize this and wanted to jump right into...say marine biology from day one and didn't want to have to bother with Principles of Chemistry.

-Get involved. Join a club, play intramural (or intercollegiate) sports, go to games, go to rallies, walk around campus, meet people, mix, mingle, party, and have fun. Don't over do it of course. You might still make it through alive, but it'll probably be a little tougher. Take it from someone who didn't allow himself to have fun and was ALL BUSINESS. That's my biggest regret about my college years.

-Call your parents...often. They will miss you.

-Finally, your first couple years at least, don't have a serious girlfriend. It'll be too tough. There is LOTS of grade A tail on most college campuses. Again, take it from a guy who had a serious girlfriend all the way through college, missing out on great poon related opportunities, only to see that relationship end at the END of college.

rageeumr
08-17-2006, 04:49 PM
If I had to go back and do it all again, the one thing that I would do is try to treat school like it was truly my job.

Don't get me wrong, you shouldn't hole yourself up and eat, breathe and sleep your classwork. Socializing and extracurriculars are important, but you need to prioritize so that they don't get in the way of your "job". I skipped a lot of classes in undergrad, and I really regret it. Just like Rain Man said, you can get the degree, but you don't learn as much.

Fish
08-17-2006, 04:51 PM
If Dr. Kenneth Carpenter is teaching Elements of Thermodynamics...... Drop it quickly....

And when your buddies are smoking pot and playing XBox all day.... don't be like them.....

Find the most secluded and quiet spot deep in the bowels of the library and study there whenever you can. Studying at home can be difficult and distracting....

Don't believe everything a professor says.... but don't tell them that....

Ask questions.... even stupid ones..... when you get that feeling that everyone understands except for you, realize that more than likely they are feeling the same way...

Don't rush it.... take your damn time.... however badly you feel about doing that homework that's due on Friday... remember that when you get a full-time job, you'll miss that shit.....

rageeumr
08-17-2006, 04:52 PM
-Finally, your first couple years at least, don't have a serious girlfriend. It'll be too tough. There is LOTS of grade A tail on most college campuses. Again, take it from a guy who had a serious girlfriend all the way through college, missing out on great poon related opportunities, only to see that relationship end at the END of college.

I second this. And if you HAVE to do it, for God sakes make sure it isn't long distance. I effed that one up.......twice. Then again my campus was 75% male. :shrug:

Edit: I forgot the slut I dated. I effed up THREE times.

Fish
08-17-2006, 04:55 PM
It doesn't matter whether or not she is on the pill: wear a condom each and every time you have sex. Please. Seriously.

Be yourself, do your own thing, and don't worry about what anyone thinks of you. You will soon have a solid group of real friends.

These are 2 very good points.... worth repeating....

Calcountry
08-17-2006, 04:56 PM
Go to class.

But in all honesty college isn't so much about learning book stuff, its other lessons in life that will make more of a difference.Join a fraternity, otherwise, you will be book smart but working at a pet shop.

Ecto-I
08-17-2006, 05:07 PM
I just graduated college in June and am a working man now, so as for my advice...

1. If you cruised through high school with good grades and minimal effort, then be ready for a shock. I was a steller student in high school, but college is a whole new ballgame, and I had to work just to do OK.

2. Your first year is probably your most important. I know a bunch of kids from my first year who didn't make it to the second. Its easy to get caught up in the fun of college life in the beginning, but keep in mind why you are there and what you are paying for. For many people, their first year of college is academically there worst. For God's sake, have fun, but don't be one of those guys who only makes it one year.

3. Be yourself. Highschool life and friendships in retrospect were largely artificial, and the friends you meet in college will likely be lifelong.

4. Get to know the people around you. Please please be social! Your immediate social network is largely created during your first year, and it is through these branches that you meet other people down the road.

Baby Lee
08-17-2006, 05:07 PM
This sounds like solid advice, sir. I will write it down in my agenda.
If you need reinforcement, figure up how many hours your spend in class regularly scheduled, then multiply that by the number of weeks in the semester and divide the tuition you pay by that #. You now know how much money you're wasting every time you skip class.

Also, take advantage of all that free time and free gym facilities to keep yourself in shape. You'll thank yourself when you're out in the workaday world paying for gym memberships and trying to fit in a workout around your marathon sessions in a cubical sitting on your duff.

ChiefFan31
08-17-2006, 05:09 PM
There has been a lot of good advice in the thread. Granted, I did not read all the posts...

BUT

let me offer a different view. Party your ass of in college man, but do good enough to graduate. It wont really matter in the workplace what your GPA was. Its the degree that counts. There will be plenty of time to be a responsible old fart later in life.

Disclaimer - if you are already the 4.0 type and you really want to graduate magna cum loudly so it will look good on your Resume, more power to you.

Bob Dole
08-17-2006, 05:12 PM
If I had to go back and do it all again, the one thing that I would do is try to treat school like it was truly my job.

That's what Bob Dole did.

Unfortunately, it wasn't until the third attempt.

Bob Dole
08-17-2006, 05:13 PM
let me offer a different view. Party your ass of in college man, but do good enough to graduate. It wont really matter in the workplace what your GPA was. Its the degree that counts. There will be plenty of time to be a responsible old fart later in life.

Screw that.

It's a lot easier to party your ass off when you've got disposable income.

leviw
08-17-2006, 05:14 PM
Remember, it goes fast. Faster than any four-plus years of your life to this point.

I remember being in your seat, scared/excited for my freshman year just four summers ago. Now I start my senior year Monday. The real world beings in nine months, and it's setting in that I'll have absolutley no clue what/where I'll be one year from now. First time that's ever happened that I didn't at least have a general idea where I'd be or what I'd be doing in a year. Again, it's scary/exciting.

Dude, enjoy it. Have fun. Go to class, but it's OK to skip every now and again. Don't take it too seriously, but take it seriously enough to not get your ass sent back home after one semester.

Don't be guarded. Talk to people and surround yourself with the good ones and stay clear of the bad ones. These people will shape the person you are for the next four years, maybe longer, so choose wisely Don't hesitate to ask questions, especially to professors, it's their job to help you. Don't get left behind and not knowing what you're doing.

Avoid getting stressed out. You'll find it all works out. You'll be busy, more so then you ever were in high school, so use your free time to get ahead. If you get stressed, it just makes things worse. Relax.

ChiefFan31
08-17-2006, 05:18 PM
Screw that.

It's a lot easier to party your ass off when you've got disposable income.

Agreed with the disposable income part.

But will it really matter when two people are interviewing for the same job when the both have the same degree. It will go to the person who interviews better.

Or even better, if one of the two knows somebody that already works at that company and has recommended you...

Baby Lee
08-17-2006, 05:22 PM
Screw that.

It's a lot easier to party your ass off when you've got disposable income.
Yeah, the 40 yo w/a fat wallet hanging out in the corner is the HIT of the sorority cotillion.

Skip Towne
08-17-2006, 05:23 PM
I use to get people in my office the day before midterm and ask rudimentary questions about the subject at hand.

Econ 1A. I would answer a question and use a term like complimentary good to answer the question, and then they would say, "what is that"?

Oh boy.

Then I would explain that, and they would say, "Do you think it will be on the test"? Oh boy.

Then we, the professor and I, would take the 100+ exams and make a scatter graph to plot standard deviations. It was his class, and this is how he wanted to "cut" the grades.

This fool that was asking me these questions was a statistical anomaly to the bottom side of the curve. We had to throw her score out, it was insignificantly below the lowest other cluster of phugtards taking the test.

I mean, when the lowest D was like 52% and a couple of F's were around 45and 42, this Chick was like the Bob Barker Babe, coming in at a whopping 21%. Of course, she had nice jugs, so I was happy to spend as much time as she wanted answering her questions even though the info rattled around in the vacuous cavern that usually held a brain.
I'll take your word for it. You should know a lot about vacuous caverns.

Skip Towne
08-17-2006, 05:29 PM
Join a fraternity, otherwise, you will be book smart but working at a pet shop.
:LOL:

Calcountry
08-17-2006, 05:30 PM
I'll take your word for it. You should know a lot about vacuous caverns.Thats why I have to strap a board to my butt.

penchief
08-17-2006, 05:30 PM
Or you could go Animals: "I was so much older then.......when I was young."

Good luck at school. It's going to be one of the best times of your life. Just don't blow it by having too much fun.

Calcountry
08-17-2006, 05:30 PM
:LOL:Kind of says it all, doesn't it. :(

ChiefsCountry
08-17-2006, 05:32 PM
Here is most important advice of all:

Meet and know as many people as possible. You never know when you can use your connections for future use.

Ultra Peanut
08-17-2006, 05:32 PM
Our precious baby is all growed up. :deevee:

el borracho
08-17-2006, 05:33 PM
#1 Study abroad and actually learn a second language.

#2 Since you already plan on grad school, get to know your undergrad advisors and talk to them about honors programs and extras that look good on grad school applications. Everyone who applies to grad school has a high GPA. To get in to a good one you should have more than that.

Bob Dole
08-17-2006, 05:44 PM
Yeah, the 40 yo w/a fat wallet hanging out in the corner is the HIT of the sorority cotillion.

Why would anyone want to be the hit of the sorority cotillion?

"Ew...you want me to do WHAT?"

But of course, Bob Dole hasn't had sex in 20 years, so maybe you're right.

|Zach|
08-17-2006, 05:45 PM
Lots of good advice here...nothing earth shattering I could add but I will still post. Because you don't get 20k posts without repeating crap others have said.

- Do not be afraid to ask for help. There are sooo many resources at universities that are available to people. Advisors, counselors, writing labs, math labs, teachers. Don't be afraid to ask questions and get help.

- Be active. Join groups and clubs and rec sports. I had a blast doing this and made a lot of connections that are valuable to me this day. If you make an ultimate frisbee team call it the easy mac all stars.

- Have fun but not too much fun. Do things in moderation. There are times to get shitfaced uber-slumberdunked drunk but those times are not nights before tests and classes. It is so easy to get into a cycle. Just take care of business. There will be plenty of time for fun.

- Keep your syllabus and create a rapport with your teacher. It is good to get a face to the name with some of those bigger classes.

- Try and carve out time to take classes of things you really enjoy. Sometimes you can be suprised by what comes of that. It led me to my passion...photography.

- Go find some up dog.

- Everyone needs quarters in the dorms. Go up and down the floors selling 3 quarters for a dollar. You will leave college with no debt.

- Say Hi to my friend Curtis. He goes to that school...plays football. In little league ball he once blitzed through an offesnive line as a linebacker...took the handoff from the opposing QB and took it the other way for a touchdown.

- Make good use of your free time. You will be suprised at how much free time you have whereas a lot of blocks where filled for you at home and at HS.

- Don't be shy...introduce yourself to that girl. What is the worst that could happen?

- If that worst scenario DOES happen it will make for a good story.

Best of luck...enjoy the ride!

Calcountry
08-17-2006, 05:49 PM
Why would anyone want to be the hit of the sorority cotillion?

"Ew...you want me to do WHAT?"

But of course, Bob Dole hasn't had sex in 20 years, so maybe you're right.ROFL Back to those Viagra commercials for Bob Dole.

jspchief
08-17-2006, 05:52 PM
Here's the advice I would give:

College is likely going to be the most fun period of your life. I don't have to tell you to have fun, because it will come naturally. But remember above all of that that you are prepping for the rest of your life. 2 years out of college, 10 years out of college, 25 years out of college, your decisions you make while in college can matter. Always keep somewhere in your mind the notion that you are setting up the next 50 years of your life.

And screw lots of girls. I found a good way to keep focused was to set a goal of screwing at least one girl from every class you take. Sometimes that means a slumpbuster, but man up and work through it.

|Zach|
08-17-2006, 05:53 PM
Sometimes that means a slumpbuster, but man up and work through it.
ROFL

Jenson71
08-17-2006, 06:19 PM
Oh, and don't go to graduate school straight from undergrad school. It's a lot more meaningful and valuable if you enter graduate school with a few years of the real world under your belt.

Well, that's something I truthfully never thought of. My plan was going straight to Wis-Mad or something after getting my BA.

I could always teach high school for a few years before going for a MA/PhD.

Currently, I'm enrolled into History - Non-Teaching, but I could easily change to History - Teaching.

I do have a girlfriend, who is entering her sophomore year at UNI. We have a class together, and I think both her and I are smart enough to know the most important thing in our lives right now is being successful in college. We've talked a lot about this.

I work at the campus, and will do that along with taking my 18 credit hours. I know that's a lot of hours, but I am confident that I can handle that and do great with that type of load. I will not crash or quit, but I could easily lessen the load for the spring semester.

I want to do a play or two, maybe write for the college newspaper, join the History Club, go to home games.

I don't drink, but I'm aware of the atmosphere and what kids do up there. I'm not looking to party though, my goal to be a great historian and teacher.

Studying abroad is definitely, absolutely something I've thought about and want to do.

Thanks for all the replies so far.

DJay23
08-17-2006, 06:23 PM
I work at the campus, and will do that along with taking my 18 credit hours. I know that's a lot of hours, but I am confident that I can handle that and do great with that type of load. I will not crash or quit, but I could easily lessen the load for the spring semester.

Wow, that is a lot of credits for ANY semester no less your FIRST semester. Working on top of it, you'll probably be pushed to the limit. I wish you the best, you seem like a good kid, I hope your plans all work out for you.

|Zach|
08-17-2006, 06:39 PM
Dude 18 hours first semester?

C'mon now.

NewChief
08-17-2006, 07:10 PM
Well, that's something I truthfully never thought of. My plan was going straight to Wis-Mad or something after getting my BA.

I could always teach high school for a few years before going for a MA/PhD.

Currently, I'm enrolled into History - Non-Teaching, but I could easily change to History - Teaching.

I do have a girlfriend, who is entering her sophomore year at UNI. We have a class together, and I think both her and I are smart enough to know the most important thing in our lives right now is being successful in college. We've talked a lot about this.

I work at the campus, and will do that along with taking my 18 credit hours. I know that's a lot of hours, but I am confident that I can handle that and do great with that type of load. I will not crash or quit, but I could easily lessen the load for the spring semester.

I want to do a play or two, maybe write for the college newspaper, join the History Club, go to home games.

I don't drink, but I'm aware of the atmosphere and what kids do up there. I'm not looking to party though, my goal to be a great historian and teacher.

Studying abroad is definitely, absolutely something I've thought about and want to do.

Thanks for all the replies so far.

Sounds like you've got a good start toward the advice I'd give you. I was going to tell you to submerge yourself in the academic college life. You don't have to be a total geek bookworm to get a good education, but if I was doing it over again, I'd definitely make my social life involve the school quite a bit more than it did. I always had this social life that was separate from the university. That is, me and my friends would all hang out and party, with school being the last thing on our minds. My friends that went to a small liberal arts school, on the other hand, were hanging out partying, and discussing the ideas that they were getting out of their classes. It really helped to reinforce the academic environment and allowed them to get the most from their education. Of course, there's also the danger of getting so wrapped up in academia that you become blind to the "real world", but you can figure that out after you graduate. Good luck on your journey, man!

epitome1170
08-17-2006, 07:38 PM
I second this. And if you HAVE to do it, for God sakes make sure it isn't long distance. I effed that one up.......twice. Then again my campus was 75% male. :shrug:

Edit: I forgot the slut I dated. I effed up THREE times.

I concur... I also messed that up... twice. Youu can waste a lot of your time hanging out with a woman instead of your true friends that will be around much longer. Make sure you take advantage of that.

Rain Man
08-17-2006, 07:49 PM
Yeah, the 40 yo w/a fat wallet hanging out in the corner is the HIT of the sorority cotillion.

I bet he can get more action.

Fish
08-17-2006, 09:51 PM
I work at the campus, and will do that along with taking my 18 credit hours. I know that's a lot of hours, but I am confident that I can handle that and do great with that type of load. I will not crash or quit, but I could easily lessen the load for the spring semester.

I want to do a play or two, maybe write for the college newspaper, join the History Club, go to home games.

Really man.... seriously think about this before you try to take on 18hrs while working, maintaining a girlfriend, and doing extra activities. This is a quick recipe for disaster..... I know you have all confidence that you can do it, and I bet you could.... but there is no need to the first semester. Take some time to settle in. Leave room for adjusting to a new lifestyle. You want that first semester to be an easy trasition, not a challenge from the start.

My opinion.... but don't push it so quickly....

|Zach|
08-17-2006, 09:59 PM
You just can't do all of those things and 18 hours...maybe after you have a semester under your belt.

Pitt Gorilla
08-17-2006, 10:04 PM
#1: maintain your grades.

Stay out of Zsavooz, Shags, Voodoo Lounge, and H2o unless you want to party with friends and get laid.

It doesn't matter whether or not she is on the pill: wear a condom each and every time you have sex. Please. Seriously.

Be open and honest with yor parents or other adults you trust about the feelings you are having as you strike out on your own. Talking to them about your fears, worries, hopes, dreams will help you more than you can imagine.

Be yourself, do your own thing, and don't worry about what anyone thinks of you. You will soon have a solid group of real friends.

Don't hide it, divide it.
Hey, you sound like a native. (I think I've asked you this before...)

trndobrd
08-17-2006, 10:10 PM
You just can't do all of those things and 18 hours...maybe after you have a semester under your belt.


Depends on the person. My grades were usually better when I had more classes and had to be more disciplined with my time. By my senior year when I had all my of my 12 hours on Tuesday and Thursday, I was pretty much a bum.

|Zach|
08-17-2006, 10:49 PM
Depends on the person. My grades were usually better when I had more classes and had to be more disciplined with my time. By my senior year when I had all my of my 12 hours on Tuesday and Thursday, I was pretty much a bum.
Mostly the nature of the extra activities he said he was interested led to my opinion.

Jenson71
08-18-2006, 05:32 AM
Mostly the nature of the extra activities he said he was interested led to my opinion.

Well, those activities (like the play, newspaper, clubs) I want to do in the course of my career here. This fall, I'm probably just going to

1. Take my 6 classes
2. Work around 9 hours a week, on Tuesday and Thursday
3. Go to home football games
4. Attend the Dylan concert (September 8) and UNI-ISU game (September 30)
5. Go to church every Sunday

phisherman
08-18-2006, 06:01 AM
geez, you're going to turn this kid into Haji in his pre-Van Wilder days...

do what i did; get wasted a lot, go to class when it's convenient, and get a degree in approximately 5 years...

my gpa was somewhere around 3.0 and i got a job right out of college making way more money than i thought i would

bp

Braincase
08-18-2006, 06:22 AM
I started in 1981, honors, academic scholly, div. 1 athlete... and after the knees were gone and the scholly was gone, I was left with me. In 2001, I finally got my bachelors. I am now considering at 42 going back to school to get a PhD.

My advice to you is simple...

FINISH!

ck_IN
08-18-2006, 07:25 AM
Remember you're in <b>school</b>. Frats and parties are fun but spend three or more hours every night studying before you even think about social activities.

You've got a great opportunity. Don't blow it.

phisherman
08-18-2006, 08:00 AM
three or more hours every night? my god....

dude, have fun, use your best judgement and don't turn into poindexter

ck_IN
08-18-2006, 08:19 AM
I guess it depends on what you're taking. My typical schedule in school was calculus, physics, one or more computer science courses, general studies elective while working 30+ hours at night.

I got two degrees in 4 years and didn't owe a dime to anyone. I took a job in Florida for nice coin and had my fun after graduating.

phisherman
08-18-2006, 08:35 AM
i'm not doubting your methods, but i worked about the same amount of hours and went through a pretty rigorous degree program (difficult enough that i was the only guy in my fraternity in 4 years to graduate in said program). there's a fine balance to be had...some people get buried in books for 4 years and miss out on a TON of good times...on the other hand, just don't be the dummy that parties super hard every night....

find a nice work/fun balance, experience life, yes, you'll have time later to have fun after school, but the people that tell you to spend that much time studying probably never had much fun in college while i was raging down pine street

tyton75
08-18-2006, 08:38 AM
I was a History major and the 2 things I would say:

Sit at the very front of the class.. no matter what and simply go to class... History is a fairly easy Major if you just remember what was said in class

phisherman
08-18-2006, 08:41 AM
history major's doing you a lot of good now eh ty?

Luke
08-18-2006, 11:11 AM
Crimson flames tied through my ears
Rollin' high and mighty traps
Pounced with fire on flaming roads
Using ideas as my maps
"We'll meet on edges, soon," said I
Proud 'neath heated brow.
Ah, but I was so much older then,
I'm younger than that now.

Half-wracked prejudice leaped forth
"Rip down all hate," I screamed
Lies that life is black and white
Spoke from my skull. I dreamed
Romantic facts of musketeers
Foundationed deep, somehow.
Ah, but I was so much older then,
I'm younger than that now.

Girls' faces formed the forward path
From phony jealousy
To memorizing politics
Of ancient history
Flung down by corpse evangelists
Unthought of, though, somehow.
Ah, but I was so much older then,
I'm younger than that now.

A self-ordained professor's tongue
Too serious to fool
Spouted out that liberty
Is just equality in school
"Equality," I spoke the word
As if a wedding vow.
Ah, but I was so much older then,
I'm younger than that now.

In a soldier's stance, I aimed my hand
At the mongrel dogs who teach
Fearing not that I'd become my enemy
In the instant that I preach
My pathway led by confusion boats
Mutiny from stern to bow.
Ah, but I was so much older then,
I'm younger than that now.


Good Luck in school,
Robert Zimmerman

Jenson71
08-18-2006, 11:18 AM
I was a History major and the 2 things I would say:

Sit at the very front of the class.. no matter what and simply go to class... History is a fairly easy Major if you just remember what was said in class

Yeah, what do you do with a History degree? Do you like it, regret it? Can you give me anymore advice, that's good so far.

PM if you want.

phisherman
08-18-2006, 11:51 AM
let's just say that tyton's job really doesn't have much to do w/ a history degree

NewChief
08-18-2006, 11:56 AM
Yeah, what do you do with a History degree? Do you like it, regret it? Can you give me anymore advice, that's good so far.

PM if you want.

One of my best friends is finishing up his PhD in history right now. Here are the jobs he's either worked at, applied at, or looked into:

1) Professor (duh)
2) High School teacher
3) Textbook author
4) US Gov't Contractor to write a history of GWI and GWII
5) Educational Curriculum consultant
6) Writer for various periodicals

He hasn't even finished his PhD yet, and he's scraped a pretty good living out of his degree. Admittedly, he does a lot of freelancing and works a variety of jobs at any given time. Once he finishes his PhD, he'll be able to settle into a cushy prof job, but he says he'd really like to be a textbook author/researcher.

ChiefFan31
08-18-2006, 02:23 PM
geez, you're going to turn this kid into Haji in his pre-Van Wilder days...

do what i did; get wasted a lot, go to class when it's convenient, and get a degree in approximately 5 years...

my gpa was somewhere around 3.0 and i got a job right out of college making way more money than i thought i would

bp

ROFL

Tommy - Hey a lot of people go to college for seven years

Richard - Yeah, they're called doctors


Disclaimer - this was not aimed at the quote above me - i just couldnt resist the chance to drop a movie quote.

Jenson71
05-02-2007, 01:22 PM
Veni, vidi, vici

Well, something like that. I've just got one more final to take tomorrow. My first year has been a real good experience.

Rain Man
05-02-2007, 02:14 PM
history major's doing you a lot of good now eh ty?

Do you expect a history major to think ahead?

My college advice:

1. Always go to class. You're paying to learn stuff.

2. If your grade is borderline, go to the prof and let them know that you really want the higher grade and is there anything you can do to get that extra few points. (Don't make it sound like a porno request, of course.) I bet my GPA ended up 0.3 points higher by doing that.

3. Go to the financial aid office a couple of weeks before class starts and a couple of weeks after class starts and ask if they know of any unclaimed scholarships or other scholarships you can apply for. By humble and be proud but slightly pitiful. It helps to have these people as your friends.

4. Put on a dress and a wig and join a sorority. Sure, the dress and the wig are kind of embarassing, but once you're in, you won't regret it.

Donger
05-02-2007, 02:18 PM
Do you expect a history major to think ahead?

No. We tend to think behind.

crazycoffey
05-02-2007, 02:21 PM
what rainman said, plus don't forget to wrap it before you slap it and all that safety stuff.

College should be fun, going to class has been stressed a few times, but I'll say that agian too, lest you graduate around your 35th birthday after three major changes, four or five colleges and half of your credit hours taken during night school while you hold down regular (sometimes) jobs and raise a family. (hence the safety around dirty debbie co-eds)

Calcountry
05-02-2007, 02:22 PM
Veni, vidi, vici

Well, something like that. I've just got one more final to take tomorrow. My first year has been a real good experience.Did you join a fraternity?

Rain Man
05-02-2007, 02:23 PM
Wait a minute. This is a historical thread. How ironic.

crazycoffey
05-02-2007, 02:26 PM
No. We tend to think behind.


Hey history man, what should I try to learn more about for my final paper?

Trail of tears

Great men of history (jefferson, hamilton, Jackson, Hamilton, and Thoreau)

Emancipation and the thirteeth amendment

or something else.

I think I'll get more from the great men of history (teacher wants the angle of shaper of history or shaped by history on each)

don't worry I won't ask anyone here to write it for me, but don't want to skip a topic because I think know it all already.

htismaqe
05-02-2007, 02:29 PM
Hey history man, what should I try to learn more about for my final paper?

Trail of tears

Great men of history (jefferson, hamilton, Jackson, Hamilton, and Thoreau)

Emancipation and the thirteeth amendment

or something else.

I think I'll get more from the great men of history (teacher wants the angle of shaper of history or shaped by history on each)

don't worry I won't ask anyone here to write it for me, but don't want to skip a topic because I think know it all already.

American History is SO boring...

Donger
05-02-2007, 02:29 PM
Hey history man, what should I try to learn more about for my final paper?

Trail of tears

Great men of history (jefferson, hamilton, Jackson, Hamilton, and Thoreau)

Emancipation and the thirteeth amendment

or something else.

I think I'll get more from the great men of history (teacher wants the angle of shaper of history or shaped by history on each)

don't worry I won't ask anyone here to write it for me, but don't want to skip a topic because I think know it all already.

Whatever you find interesting.

crazycoffey
05-02-2007, 02:38 PM
Whatever you find interesting.

I find all of them interesting, but I'm also not a history buff, I was curious on your take, that's all.


American History is SO boring...


Yup, and my instructor is very high on himself (I wonder if that's a pre requisite of sorts for those History majors, hint hint Jenson, see Donger..... :p)


To any event - didn't mean to hijack the thread, Jenson you could answer too, other wise I'll assign the topics number and roll a die.

NewChief
05-02-2007, 02:40 PM
American History is SO boring...

I think it gets pretty damned interesting shortly after the Civil War up to about 1970. Lots of weird fringe political and countercultural movements going on that are fascinating (to me).

Donger
05-02-2007, 02:41 PM
I find all of them interesting, but I'm also not a history buff, I was curious on your take, that's all.





Yup, and my instructor is very high on himself (I wonder if that's a pre requisite of sorts for those History majors, hint hint Jenson, see Donger..... :p)


To any event - didn't mean to hijack the thread, Jenson you could answer too, other wise I'll assign the topics number and roll a die.

Well, I find pretty much all history interesting, but my focus was on WWII Europe, so I can't really give you much input.

crazycoffey
05-02-2007, 02:42 PM
Well, I find pretty much all history interesting, but my focus was on WWII Europe, so I can't really give you much input.


alright, thanks anyway then.....

Dr. Facebook Fever
05-02-2007, 02:48 PM
I'm older than that now...

-----------

Gentlemen, I'll be going to college tomorrow. Monday will be my first class. I'm pretty excited. I know getting advice from people who have experience is a good idea, so I'm asking, what can you give me, that I can take as I start college, and not just in college, but in life, in general?
Jenson you're growing up right before our eyes. It seems like only yesterday I could bounce you on my knee.

I'm getting a little veclempt here...... excuse me.......... talk amongst yourselves......................

htismaqe
05-02-2007, 02:48 PM
I think it gets pretty damned interesting shortly after the Civil War up to about 1970. Lots of weird fringe political and countercultural movements going on that are fascinating (to me).


EEEEWWWWW...Reconstruction to the Present is the WORST era of American History...

ClevelandBronco
05-02-2007, 02:58 PM
Leave the bong at home.

NewChief
05-02-2007, 02:59 PM
EEEEWWWWW...Reconstruction to the Present is the WORST era of American History...

Anarchist movements, labor movement, Harlem Renaissance, Great Depression, Dust Bowl, WWII, Beatniks, Hippies, Civil Rights Movements.... good stuff that brought about some wondeful literature. You have to realize, though, that I look at everything through the lens of literature.

Tactical Funky
05-02-2007, 03:55 PM
Dude 18 hours first semester?

C'mon now.
Indeed.

Jenson71, a good rule of thumb is to never take more than 15 hours per semester unless you absolutely have to. 18 hours plus a job is going to weigh heavily on anyone, whether they feel prepared for it or not. Besides, most majors can be completed in 4 years with an average of 15 hours of coursework each term and one or two summer classes inbetween.

Trust me on this... :(

Stewie
05-02-2007, 04:18 PM
Get a degree in something with substance. You have no idea how many people that have menial jobs where I work that graduated with "fries with that?" degrees. Unless you want to get an advanced degree in said majors it's a waste of money and time. My two cents.

excessive
05-02-2007, 04:26 PM
Get a degree in something with substance. You have no idea how many people that have menial jobs where I work that graduated with "fries with that?" degrees. Unless you want to get an advanced degree in said majors it's a waste of money and time. My two cents.

agreed. As a college "perfesser", with a degree in a "fries with that" discipline (English), I can offer testimony to that sentiment.

The old joke for such a degree goes like this: What do you do with a degree in English (or History or any other fires with that degree)?

answer: wait tables, or teach.

I chose teaching.

Jenson71
05-02-2007, 04:28 PM
I'm a double major (History and Political Science) and also have a minor (Politics and Law). I'd really like to go to graduate school and becoming a history professor. I would do this if I can get into a top history program. If not, I'll just go to law school.

I started off taking 18 hours last semester, dropped Statistics cause I didn't understand it, and ended up taking 18 hours this semester, which worked out fine. Next fall I'm only taking 15 though.

Donger
05-02-2007, 04:31 PM
agreed. As a college "perfesser", with a degree in a "fries with that" discipline (English), I can offer testimony to that sentiment.

The old joke for such a degree goes like this: What do you do with a degree in English (or History or any other fires with that degree)?

answer: wait tables, or teach.

I chose teaching.

I considered teaching, and was pushed to go for a doctorate, but I just couldn't see myself dealing with the "teaching" of 100 level classes. I'm quite certain I would have killed almost every student.

Then again, I'm not a very tolerant person.

htismaqe
05-02-2007, 05:52 PM
Anarchist movements, labor movement, Harlem Renaissance, Great Depression, Dust Bowl, WWII, Beatniks, Hippies, Civil Rights Movements.... good stuff that brought about some wondeful literature. You have to realize, though, that I look at everything through the lens of literature.

Sorry, but none of those compare to the Visigoths sacking Rome or Hannibal marching African elephants through the Alps.

As for literature, how about Plutarch or Ovid?

htismaqe
05-02-2007, 05:53 PM
I have a history degree and I'm an engineer.

Get an EDUCATION. If you want to learn a vocation, go to Community College.

NewChief
05-02-2007, 06:27 PM
Sorry, but none of those compare to the Visigoths sacking Rome or Hannibal marching African elephants through the Alps.

As for literature, how about Plutarch or Ovid?

True. I do like Ancient and Early Western Civ very well. I had a flamboyantly gay professor for Civ. I, and he was absolutely hilariously riveting when we did the Romans. It was like tuning into some nutty soap opera every class period. As for classical lit., it's not my bag. I like some of it alright (love mythology), but I prefer novels over everything for reading.

DaKCMan AP
05-02-2007, 06:41 PM
Tomorrow I get to take two finals and then graduate with my M.S.E.E. Then next week I move to Clearwater and start full-time work. I'm going to miss the college life.

|Zach|
05-02-2007, 06:45 PM
Veni, vidi, vici

Well, something like that. I've just got one more final to take tomorrow. My first year has been a real good experience.
Good for you man. :clap: