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booyaf2
10-31-2006, 10:43 AM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/writers/jeffri_chadiha/10/31/green/index.html

Kind of a chiling story. But I like his heart and determination at the end.

Lzen
10-31-2006, 10:58 AM
Quoted just for dr00d:

One thing Green hasn't worried about is whether he will keep playing. He and Julie have discussed the issue of whether his playing will lead to further risk, and as long as doctors have assured him that he's not opening himself up to more problems, everybody in the Green camp is cool with his return.

"I've had friends ask me if I'm coming back if we're out of playoff contention, and I've told them all the same thing," Green said. "This is what I do. And as soon as I get clearance from the doctor, regardless of what our record is, I'll be back out there."

DaFace
10-31-2006, 11:04 AM
Weird. I was going to try and post the full article, but it won't let me.

Anyway, good article. And further confirmation that dr00d's rumor is complete and utter BS.

bogie
10-31-2006, 11:13 AM
"as long as doctors have assured him that he's not opening himself up to more problems"
How can a Dr. assure him of that?

Braincase
10-31-2006, 11:14 AM
Quoted just for dr00d:

So much for d00sh's quilting circle with his Sweet Adeline's group at church.

StcChief
10-31-2006, 11:35 AM
Trent's a warrior. First and for most. a smart cautious one. His first concussion....Gaethers is POS.

TinyEvel
10-31-2006, 11:38 AM
Trent HAS to come back.
Otherwise there would be no QB controversy, and the biggest CP debate subject since "Will we get Ty Law?" will have all been for naught.

TRR
10-31-2006, 12:06 PM
"as long as doctors have assured him that he's not opening himself up to more problems"
How can a Dr. assure him of that?

Through neuralogical tests, I am sure that doctors can tell Green he's not in any more risk than if he never had the concussion. There is a point where the risk factors go away of having another concussion.

bogie
10-31-2006, 12:28 PM
Through neuralogical tests, I am sure that doctors can tell Green he's not in any more risk than if he never had the concussion. There is a point where the risk factors go away of having another concussion.

Makes complete sense.

Calcountry
10-31-2006, 01:04 PM
"as long as doctors have assured him that he's not opening himself up to more problems"
How can a Dr. assure him of that?Teddy Bruschi anyone?

Ari Chi3fs
10-31-2006, 01:10 PM
Julie Green sensed it was time to put her husband, Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Trent Green, to the test on a warm, late September afternoon. The couple were waiting for their sons, T.J. and Derek, to get out of elementary school when Julie asked if Trent wanted to try driving home. It had been nearly 2 weeks since he had sustained a concussion in a season-opening loss to Cincinnati, a blow so severe that doctors wouldn't let him drive a car until he felt more comfortable. Now, after a few days without him having experienced any symptoms, Julie wanted to see if he could handle the 10-minute drive back to their home. In her eyes, it would be good for their children to see their father driving again.

It seemed like a solid idea until Trent pulled away from the school. First the couple's 10-month-old daughter, Janelle, started crying. Then T.J. tried telling Trent about his day at school, a move that prompted Derek to recap his own experiences in the classroom. Before long, the boys were talking to be heard over one another, their sister was wailing louder and Julie was chuckling.

"I guess I couldn't have asked for a better test," she said as Trent laughed and focused on the road. "If you can drive with all this going on, you're better than I thought."

That day was just one indication that Green is handling his recovery as well as he possibly can. After missing the Chiefs' past six games, he's practicing again -- he participated in individual drills last week and hopes doctors will allow him to participate in full team practice sessions this week.

He's also moving closer to the point where he can think about playing in a real game. His doctors have told him he would need at least one week, possibly two, of practice before they'd allow him to take a hit. That means he could be ready for the Miami game on Nov. 12, the Raiders game on Nov. 19 or, as he says, "it could even be beyond that. Nobody has said anything yet."

One thing the 36-year-old Green won't do is rush back. He admits that he's pushed his way through other injuries in the past, whether it was a sprained ankle or a torn knee ligament. This time, however, he acknowledges that his head is in the right place.

"The further I get away from the injury, the better I feel," Green says. "I feel like I could play, and that's mostly because football is one of those games where you're always playing with some kind of pain. But this is my head we're talking about. So I've just been trying to absorb what I can from my neurosurgeons and do what they tell me. That's all I can do at this point."

Green isn't saying this because the Chiefs have found a way to win games with Damon Huard under center. He's saying it because he realizes how vital it is to handle this situation properly. He's never dealt with a concussion at any stage of his 13-year career, but his first experience has been enough to make him cautious about the recovery process. He knows that multiple concussions ended the careers of Hall of Fame quarterbacks such as Steve Young and Troy Aikman, and he doesn't want to join that list. Besides, this isn't just his career he's trying to manage. His quality of life is also at risk, all because of what happened on that rainy afternoon on Sept. 10.

With his team trailing 20-3 in the third quarter, Green scrambled out of the pocket in the hope of picking up a first down. He saw the yard marker as he ran closer to the Chiefs' sideline and then he glimpsed Bengals defensive end Robert Geathers bearing down on him. The irony here is that Green doesn't like to slide; he says it feels awkward. But when Geathers dove toward him, Green slid feet-first to the turf immediately. Geathers' shoulder pads drove Green's upper body and head to the turf, and Green doubts he'll ever remember the 20 to 25 minutes that followed that play.

When Green woke up, he was in an ambulance heading to a nearby hospital. He had no clue why he'd been strapped to a gurney, why his pads had been removed, why he was wearing a helmet that had no face mask on it. Green says he "freaked out" initially, and he even tried yanking the helmet off his head. But Julie calmed him down and implored him to stay still. She didn't tell him how frazzled she was, how she had kept his family from seeing him on that gurney back at the stadium and how she wondered if he would even remember her name when he awoke. She prayed that no worse news would come out of that chilling day.

"That was the scariest moment of my life," Julie says. "When he was out, I didn't even know if he was alive."

From that day on, Green has had to adjust to the limitations that concussions create for athletes. He spent two days in a hospital, undergoing a battery of neurological tests and taking drugs that kept him loopy. When he left the hospital, he still felt disoriented at times. If he got out of bed too quickly, he'd feel light-headed. If he spent too long tying his shoes and pulled his head up too quickly, he'd experience a similarly dreadful feeling.

He loved being around his children for longer stretches than he'd ever had at this time of year -- playing catch with the boys in the backyard, tending to his daughter during the mornings -- but he also had an itch to get back on the field. He'd sit around thinking about the meetings he'd missed, the film sessions he'd be attending, the game-planning that had been a weekly part of every fall for years.

As the weeks have passed, Green has eased that anxiety by learning quite a bit about concussions. He's talked to Arizona Cardinals quarterback Kurt Warner, his old teammate with the St. Louis Rams, about what Warner experienced when he recovered from the same injury. He's sought advice from Young for the same reason. What Green discovered is that everybody suffers through different issues after concussions.

"I haven't had any headaches," he says. "There's been no sensitivity to light or sounds, and I haven't had any short-term memory loss. The only thing I had was that fuzzy feeling in my head."

The real challenge for Green is determining exactly when he can handle contact again. He can't simulate the kinds of hits he'll take in a game, but he knows that how he weathers those tackles will be the best indication of his health.

Doctors have told Green that the more time that passes between his return to the field and the date of his concussion, the lesser the likelihood will be that he'll sustain another one. If he comes back too soon, his susceptibility to another concussion increases. So far Green has passed every test that doctors have put him through; the key is determining when he's reached the right side of the timeline.

One thing Green hasn't worried about is whether he will keep playing. He and Julie have discussed the issue of whether his playing will lead to further risk, and as long as doctors have assured him that he's not opening himself up to more problems, everybody in the Green camp is cool with his return.

"I've had friends ask me if I'm coming back if we're out of playoff contention, and I've told them all the same thing," Green said. "This is what I do. And as soon as I get clearance from the doctor, regardless of what our record is, I'll be back out there."

Rain Man
10-31-2006, 01:13 PM
I got a hefty concussion several years back when I was in a car that got broadsided. I never lost consciousness, but I was walking around talking insurance and stuff and I felt like my head was floating about six inches behind my movement. Then they put me in the ambulance on a stretcher, and I was still holding a pen and paper for the insurance stuff, and I kept holding them straight up in the air. After a while, I noticed it and thought that maybe I should bring my arms down, but for some reason decided against it. It was an odd experience.

Lzen
10-31-2006, 01:45 PM
I got a hefty concussion several years back when I was in a car that got broadsided. I never lost consciousness, but I was walking around talking insurance and stuff and I felt like my head was floating about six inches behind my movement. Then they put me in the ambulance on a stretcher, and I was still holding a pen and paper for the insurance stuff, and I kept holding them straight up in the air. After a while, I noticed it and thought that maybe I should bring my arms down, but for some reason decided against it. It was an odd experience.


Hmmm........that explains a lot about you.

:p