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ferrarispider95
11-08-2006, 11:52 AM
I bought an office building that I am remodeling and I thought about running a network throughout the building so each office would have a cat5 jack for internet.

I thought it would be a nice incentive by providing free internet as a perk of renting.

Can I give away internet in a building if I am purchasing the cable connection myself? I was planning on using a router to divide the connection up and then upgrading to the faster business connection.

If so, is something that I tell them they use at their own risk. Also is there anyway to firewall each computer so guy in office 3 can't snoop on guy in office 8.


Or would I better to do just a wireless connection with wep encryption and change the passcodes every some often.

I would appreciate any help. BTW we get our broadband from either SBC Global DSL or I can go through Cable One.

Fish
11-08-2006, 01:48 PM
I'm assuming you would have no part in the business happenings of whatever businesses would be renting here...

Can I give away internet in a building if I am purchasing the cable connection myself?
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If so, is something that I tell them they use at their own risk.

Yes, but you still have a responsibility for that internet should something go wrong. Imagine 6 months from now that the router/modem/etc. should go bad. These folks have become dependent on the free internet you are providing, and they'll want it fixed on your dime. You can't really provide that service and then just tell them it's unsupported if something should go wrong. Most small businesses would depend on internet access pretty heavily, and would be on you like flies on a Raider fan the moment it went down.

Also is there anyway to firewall each computer so guy in office 3 can't snoop on guy in office 8.

XP comes with a built-in software firewall. But if you're not administrating these machines, that would/should be their responsibility.


I'd recommend putting the wiring in place, but making them provide their own service. This would still be a huge incentive for them in not having to pay for wiring and such. This just sounds like a ton of trouble if you would provide their internet with no support. This could scare off some small businesses who would need a different/higher bandwidth connection and reasonable support should something go wrong.

ferrarispider95
11-08-2006, 02:12 PM
Current tenants and I assume most new tennants will not heavily reply on the internet except for casual use and email. I was planning on doing a pretty basic system so I can fix any problems myself. I have another business, different buidling, and it is completely wired front to back with internet and a router and I haven't had any problems in 4 years.

My worry is that some tenant will affect their computer with a virus and it will spread throughout the network and mess up other tenants computers.

ferrarispider95
11-08-2006, 02:13 PM
So I would assume I would have to have a liablity clause saying that I am not responsible for any damages that are caused by being hooked up to the network and explain any hazards that may exist to them and let them make a decision.

Fish
11-08-2006, 02:38 PM
I assume most new tennants will not heavily reply on the internet except for casual use and email. I was planning on doing a pretty basic system so I can fix any problems myself.

To me... that's a dangerous assumption. I'm not trying to dissuade you or anything, but I think that's asking for trouble.


So I would assume I would have to have a liablity clause saying that I am not responsible for any damages that are caused by being hooked up to the network and explain any hazards that may exist to them and let them make a decision.

If they would accept that. And that clause could get complicated if you're going to cover all your bases.

Again, I don't really have any background as to what type of businesses these are, I'm just pointing out issues that I could see happening.

Simplex3
11-09-2006, 06:32 AM
Another option is multiple routers, single connection. Basically you want to bar them from speaking to eachother. Most cable companies will allow you to get multiple IPs from a single cable connection. Usually it's between 3 and 5. The basic premise is that you plug a hub/switch into your cable modem, then hang 5 cheapo internet routers off that hub/switch, then run cables from each router to each office. Viola, they're totally seperated until they hit the Internet, ie NOT your equipment. If they get hacked, even by someone that originated on your network, it was still an Internet exposed flaw that was going to get hacked by someone, somewhere.