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Boyceofsummer
11-16-2006, 10:39 PM
My friend was insulted!

Anybody else wish to weigh-in on this cultural phenomenon?

Halfcan
11-16-2006, 10:42 PM
Never seen it-if it was free I would probably check it out-kinda like Jack Ass-but to pay for a ticket to see a bunch of stoopid shit-no thanks.

|Zach|
11-16-2006, 10:44 PM
Never seen it-if it was free I would probably check it out-kinda like Jack Ass-but to pay for a ticket to see a bunch of stoopid shit-no thanks.
Eh, Borat usually goes deeper than that. It is less candid camera "gotcha" type humor. That style is used to drive home some interesting cultural and political points.

If thats not you thing thats very understandable...but to put it beside Jackass seem like a stretch..

boogblaster
11-16-2006, 10:46 PM
cultureless camel-humping satire to ease the boobyazee...

Crashride
11-16-2006, 10:47 PM
This movie is brilliant...far from jackass

elvomito
11-16-2006, 10:52 PM
i didn't like the love aspect... not the baywatch, but the bigbetty....
anyway, i've seen all the borat parts in the ali g shows so the movie wasn't much new to me, and i feel it wasn't offensive enough... a borat FILM should set a new standard. loved it though.

'Hamas' Jenkins
11-16-2006, 11:04 PM
Is your friend a jew?

Thig Lyfe
11-16-2006, 11:07 PM
Eh, Borat usually goes deeper than that. It is less candid camera "gotcha" type humor. That style is used to drive home some interesting cultural and political points.

If thats not you thing thats very understandable...but to put it beside Jackass seem like a stretch..

A lot of people who don't get it lump with Jackass. Because they're morons.

Also, this thread is a repost.

CHENZ A!
11-16-2006, 11:12 PM
more improv comedy, less lightin ballsacks on fire and jumping off of shit with other shit stuck up your brown eye

Halfcan
11-16-2006, 11:16 PM
Eh, Borat usually goes deeper than that. It is less candid camera "gotcha" type humor. That style is used to drive home some interesting cultural and political points.

If thats not you thing thats very understandable...but to put it beside Jackass seem like a stretch..

Cool, I will definately check it out on DVD-rent it-not buy it most likely.

noa
11-16-2006, 11:22 PM
People who are offended by Borat ought to shampoo my crotch. You can say its not funny if that's what you think, but to be insulted by it is missing the entire point.

Demonpenz
11-16-2006, 11:31 PM
it's kind of like napolean dynamite which i thought was dumb. I guess it's either love it or hate it movie.

Thig Lyfe
11-16-2006, 11:39 PM
it's kind of like napolean dynamite which i thought was dumb. I guess it's either love it or hate it movie.

Except that it is in no way like Napoleon Dynamite. But okay.

Demonpenz
11-16-2006, 11:43 PM
Except that it is in no way like Napoleon Dynamite. But okay.


I haven't seen borat yet but I just read some articles where it compared it to napolean because it has a strange lead character that you don't really know what to think and they talk funny and some people really like it and some people hate it. I guess I will have to see for myself.

Boyceofsummer
11-16-2006, 11:51 PM
People who are offended by Borat ought to shampoo my crotch. You can say its not funny if that's what you think, but to be insulted by it is missing the entire point.

insulting people. They squirm on the screen and in the theatre seats. The only people offended were the hapless victims portrayed on-screen.......................NOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Baby Lee
11-17-2006, 08:22 AM
Eh, Borat usually goes deeper than that. It is less candid camera "gotcha" type humor. That style is used to drive home some interesting cultural and political points.

If thats not you thing thats very understandable...but to put it beside Jackass seem like a stretch..
Not sure what you mean and am curious about it.
First off, are you saying candid camera humor is used to drive home cultural and political points, but Borat is not?
Second, if Borat is driving home points, what points do you think he's making.
Serious inquiry.

JBucc
11-17-2006, 08:34 AM
It seems funny. I'll have to see it when it comes out on the DVD.

siberian khatru
11-17-2006, 08:41 AM
It was one of the funniest movies I've ever seen. At one point I had tears streaming down my face, I was laughing so hard.

Chiefnj
11-17-2006, 08:44 AM
Borat has some of the funniest scenes in movie history.

jidar
11-17-2006, 08:46 AM
being insulted when someone isn't try to deliberately insult you is for faggots.

Fairplay
11-17-2006, 08:47 AM
Eh, Borat usually goes deeper than that. It is less candid camera "gotcha" type humor. That style is used to drive home some interesting cultural and political points.

If thats not you thing thats very understandable...but to put it beside Jackass seem like a stretch..



Seems like a DVD'er to me.

Chiefnj
11-17-2006, 08:52 AM
Seems like a DVD'er to me.

Not at all. It is best seen in the movies.

siberian khatru
11-17-2006, 08:59 AM
Not at all. It is best seen in the movies.

I'd agree. I saw it in a crowded theater, and I think all that laughter just adds to the experience.

BigRedChief
11-17-2006, 09:03 AM
making fun of under educated people, people who are struggling in their lifes and lieing to them so you can make fun of them is not my idea of entertainment.

Mr. Kotter
11-17-2006, 09:13 AM
making fun of under educated people, people who are struggling in their lifes and lieing to them so you can make fun of them is not my idea of entertainment.

Borat is about Raider Fans? :spock:

Cool. I'll have to see it.

Seriously though, it sounds pretty funny to me.

bkkcoh
11-17-2006, 09:14 AM
It almost sounds as if a lot of people who are offended by Borat, they need to lighten up. Get a life. They feel bad because they were suckered into doing something or saying something that they probably would tell their closest friend, but are embarrassed because it came out in public.

MVChiefFan
11-17-2006, 09:16 AM
I went to the 2:50 show on saturday afternoon the weekend it opened and it was so crowded that people were standing up in the hallway during the whole movie. I was surprised at how diverse the crowd was. College kids all the way to couples in their 50's and everyone was rolling in the floor. I thought one old lady was going to die! The only thing that I saw people get uncomfortable with was during the church scene (surprise, surprise, it's springfield). They didn't know whether to laugh or not but my wife and I were absolutely crying. I think it's genious and I'm going to watch it again with my friend this weekend.

GoHuge
11-17-2006, 09:18 AM
I'd agree. I saw it in a crowded theater, and I think all that laughter just adds to the experience.Yeah I'd say it's a must see. Here just check out this little trailer and give it a chance to marinate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhiJZmxtll8

BigRedChief
11-17-2006, 09:23 AM
It almost sounds as if a lot of people who are offended by Borat, they need to lighten up. Get a life. They feel bad because they were suckered into doing something or saying something that they probably would tell their closest friend, but are embarrassed because it came out in public.
It's why people watch Jerry Springer. They can look at those people and laugh at them. Make them feel better about themselfs. Man, look at that family they are truly messed up. At least I'm not that bad off.


I'm not saying your morally wrong to laugh at other peoples misfortunes its just not something I consider entertainment.

rageeumr
11-17-2006, 09:25 AM
I am not a huge fan of "awkward" humor. (For example, I love The Office, but there are parts of it that I don't really like... like the one about the gay dude that Michael's trying to kiss) anyway, the way that this movie is done you can't help but laugh. Easily the funniest movie I have seen in the last 5 years. Perhaps ever.

Chiefnj
11-17-2006, 10:01 AM
making fun of under educated people, people who are struggling in their lifes and lieing to them so you can make fun of them is not my idea of entertainment.

You are referring to the scenes of his "village" I presume. People who were willing to be filmed, but when they found out about the money being made they are suddenly outraged. The majority of the film is in the U.S. and in no way makes fun of under educted and struggling people - quite the opposite.

Baby Lee
11-17-2006, 10:04 AM
You are referring to the scenes of his "village" I presume. People who were willing to be filmed, but when they found out about the money being made they are suddenly outraged. The majority of the film is in the U.S. and in no way makes fun of under educted and struggling people - quite the opposite.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=415871&in_page_id=1770

When Sacha Baron Cohen wanted a village to represent the impoverished Kazakh home of his character Borat, he found the perfect place in Glod: a remote mountain outpost with no sewerage or running water and where locals eke out meagre livings peddling scrap iron or working patches of land.

• Watch the trailer for Borat's movie here


But now the villagers of this tiny, close-knit community have angrily accused the comedian of exploiting them, after discovering his new blockbuster film portrays them as a backward group of rapists, abortionists and prostitutes, who happily engage in casual incest.

They claim film-makers lied to them about the true nature of the project, which they believed would be a documentary about their hardship, rather than a comedy mocking their poverty and isolation.

Villagers say they were paid just £3 each for this humiliation, for a film that took around £27million at the worldwide box office in its first week of release.

Now they are planning to scrape together whatever modest sums they can muster to sue Baron Cohen and fellow film-makers, claiming they never gave their consent to be so cruelly misrepresented.

Disabled Nicu Tudorache said: This is disgusting. They conned us into doing all these things and never told us anything about what was going on. They made us look like primitives, like uncivilised savages. Now they,re making millions but have only paid us 15 lei [around £3].

Cambridge-educated Baron Cohen filmed the opening scenes of the Borat movie in Glod - a village that is actually in Romania, rather than Kazakhstan, and whose name literally translates as 'mud', last summer.

Its 1,000 residents live in dilapidated huts in the shadow of the Carpathian mountains. Toilets are little more than sheltered holes in the ground and horses and donkeys are the only source of transport.

Just four villagers have permanent employment in the nearby towns of Pucioasa or Fieni, while the rest live off what little welfare benefits they get.

So when a Hollywood film crew descended on a nearby run-down motel last September, with their flashy cars and expensive equipment, locals thought their lowly community might finally be getting some of the investment it so desperately needs.

The crew was led by a man villagers describe as 'nice and friendly, if a bit weird and ugly', who they later learned was Baron Cohen. It is thought the producers chose the region because locals more closely resembled his comic creation than genuine Kazakhs.

The comedian insisted on travelling everywhere with bulky bodyguards, because, as one local said: 'He seemed to think there were crooks among us.'

While the rest of the crew based themselves in the motel, Baron Cohen stayed in a hotel in Sinaia, a nearby ski resort a world away from Glod's grinding poverty. He would come to the village every morning to do 'weird things', such as bringing animals inside the run-down homes, or have the village children filmed holding weapons.

Mr Tudorache, a deeply religious grandfather who lost his arm in an accident, was one of those who feels most humiliated. For one scene, a rubber sex toy in the shape of a fist was attached to the stump of his missing arm - but he had no idea what it was.

Only when The Mail on Sunday visited him did he find out. He said he was ashamed, confessing that he only agreed to be filmed because he hoped to top up his £70-a-month salary - although in the end he was paid just £3.

He invited us into his humble home and brought out the best food and drink his family had. Visibly disturbed, he said shakily: 'Someone from the council said these Americans need a man with no arm for some scenes. I said yes but I never imagined the whole country, or even the whole world, will see me in the cinemas ridiculed in this way. This is disgusting.

'Our region is very poor, and everyone is trying hard to get out of this misery. It is outrageous to exploit people's misfortune like this to laugh at them.

'We are now coming together and will try to hire a lawyer and take legal action for being cheated and exploited. We are simple folk and don't know anything about these things, but I have faith in God and justice.'

If the village does sue the film-makers, they won't be the first. Last week, two unnamed college students who were caught on film drunkenly making racist and sexist comments took legal action, claiming the production team plied them with alcohol and falsely promised that the footage would never be seen in America.

Many other unwitting victims of Baron Cohen's pranks have also spoken out against the way they were conned and - unsurprisingly - the rulers of Kazakhstan have long taken issue with the image Borat paints of their vast, oil-rich nation.

The residents of Glod only found out about the true nature of the film after seeing a Romanian TV report. Some thought it was an art project, others a documentary.

The Mail on Sunday showed them the cinema trailer - the first footage they had seen from the film. Many were on the brink of tears as they saw how they were portrayed.

Claudia Luca, who lives with her extended family in the house next to the one that served as Borat's home, said: 'We now realise they only came here because we are poorer than anyone else in this village. They never told us what they were doing but took advantage of our misfortune and poverty. They made us look like savages, why would anyone do that?'

Her brother-in law Gheorghe Luca owns the house that stood in for Borat's - which the film-makers adorned by bringing a live cow into his living room.

Luca, who now refers to Baron Cohen as to the 'ugly, tall, moustachioed American man', even though the 35-year-old comedian is British, said: 'They paid my family £30 for four full days. They were nice and friendly, but we could not understand a single word they were saying.

'It was very uncomfortable at the end and there was animal manure all over our home. We endured it because we are poor and badly needed the money, but now we realise we were cheated and taken advantage of in the worst way.

'All those things they said about us in the film are terribly humiliating. They said we drink horse urine and sleep with our own kin. You say it's comedy, but how can someone laugh at that?'

Spirea Ciorobea, who played the 'village mechanic and abortionist', said: 'What I saw looks disgusting. Even if we are uneducated and poor, it is not fair that someone does this to us.'

He remembered wondering why the crew took an old, broken Dacia car and turned it into a horse cart. He said: 'We all thought they were a bit crazy, but now its seems they wanted to show that it is us who drive around in carts like that.'

Local councillor Nicolae Staicu helped the crew with their shooting, but he claims he was never told what sort of movie they were making, and that they failed to get a proper permit for filming.

Staicu, who had never dealt with a film crew before, said: 'I was happy they came and I thought it would be useful for our country, but they never bothered to ask for a permit, let alone pay the official fees.

'I realise I should have taken some legal steps but I was simply naive enough to believe that they actually wanted to do something good for the community here.

'They came with bodyguards and expensive cars and just went on with their job, so we assumed someone official in the capital Bucharest had let them film.'

Bogdan Moncea of Castel Film, the Bucharest-based production company that helped the filming in Romania, said the crew donated computers and TV sets to the local school and the villagers. But the locals have denied this.

Mr Staicu said: 'The school got some notebooks, but that was it. People are angry now, they feel cheated.'

It's a feeling Glod is used to. The village, like others in the Dambovita region of Romania, is populated mainly by gipsies who say they are discriminated against by the rest of the country.

Indeed, when local vice-mayor Petre Buzea was asked whether the people felt offended by Baron Cohen's film, he replied: 'They got paid so I am sure they are happy. These gipsies will even kill their own father for money.'

No one from the 20th Century Fox studio was available for comment on the villagers' claims.

But feelings in Glod are running so high that The Mail on Sunday saw angry villagers brandishing farm implements chase out a local TV crew, shouting that they had enough of being exploited.

It is small comfort that few, if any, of them will get to see the Borat film. Not a single villager we spoke to had ever been able to afford a trip to the nearest cinema, 20 miles away.

Perhaps that's the real reason why film-makers chose Glod in the first place.

BigRedChief
11-17-2006, 10:08 AM
You are referring to the scenes of his "village" I presume. People who were willing to be filmed, but when they found out about the money being made they are suddenly outraged. The majority of the film is in the U.S. and in no way makes fun of under educted and struggling people - quite the opposite.
People are willing to do anything to get on TV or in amovie. Hell I'm draggin my ass out of bed at 6:00 am tommorrow morning to appear on the KC version of Good Morning America. But my motive is not to see myself on TV but to promote a charity fundraiser.

Now could they use this an oppertunity to grill me on something instead of doing a fluff interview? Sure but thats the rissk I knowlingly take. Was everyone in the movie aware that they could be made to look like fools? That the intent of the movie as told to them was not the real intent of the movie.

Deception took place so we could use their stupidity to make ourself laugh.

MahiMike
11-17-2006, 10:11 AM
If it's offensive then I want to see it. This world needs more political INcorrectness than the opposite. :clap:

memyselfI
11-17-2006, 10:13 AM
Excellent. SBC fufilled his wish then. :clap:

All he did was hold up a mirror...

Chiefnj
11-17-2006, 10:14 AM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=415871&in_page_id=1770

When Sacha Baron Cohen wanted a village to represent the impoverished Kazakh ...

Villagers say they were paid just £3 each for this humiliation, for a film that took around £27million at the worldwide box office in its first week of release.

Now they are planning to scrape together whatever modest sums they can muster to sue Baron Cohen and fellow film-makers, claiming they never gave their consent to be so cruelly misrepresented.

Disabled Nicu Tudorache said: This is disgusting. They conned us into doing all these things and never told us anything about what was going on. They made us look like primitives, like uncivilised savages. Now they,re making millions but have only paid us 15 lei [around £3].

So when a Hollywood film crew descended on a nearby run-down motel last September, with their flashy cars and expensive equipment, locals thought their lowly community might finally be getting some of the investment it so desperately needs.

While the rest of the crew based themselves in the motel, Baron Cohen stayed in a hotel in Sinaia, a nearby ski resort a world away from Glod's grinding poverty. He would come to the village every morning to do 'weird things', such as bringing animals inside the run-down homes, or have the village children filmed holding weapons.

Only when The Mail on Sunday visited him did he find out. He said he was ashamed, confessing that he only agreed to be filmed because he hoped to top up his £70-a-month salary - although in the end he was paid just £3.

'We are now coming together and will try to hire a lawyer and take legal action for being cheated and exploited. We are simple folk and don't know anything about these things, but I have faith in God and justice.'

'It was very uncomfortable at the end and there was animal manure all over our home. We endured it because we are poor and badly needed the money, but now we realise we were cheated and taken advantage of in the worst way.

He remembered wondering why the crew took an old, broken Dacia car and turned it into a horse cart. He said: 'We all thought they were a bit crazy, but now its seems they wanted to show that it is us who drive around in carts like that.'

.

What's your point? I think the article reinforces my statement that they want more money.

Baby Lee
11-17-2006, 10:27 AM
What's your point? I think the article reinforces my statement that they want more money.
Not tryi ng to start a fight. Just providing the entire picture.
People who were willing to be filmed, but when they found out about the money being made they are suddenly outraged.
You portray it as a bunch of star-effers who just want some scratch, but the article points out;
But now the villagers of this tiny, close-knit community have angrily accused the comedian of exploiting them, after discovering his new blockbuster film portrays them as a backward group of rapists, abortionists and prostitutes, who happily engage in casual incest.

They claim film-makers lied to them about the true nature of the project, which they believed would be a documentary about their hardship, rather than a comedy mocking their poverty and isolation.


Disabled Nicu Tudorache said: This is disgusting. They conned us into doing all these things and never told us anything about what was going on. They made us look like primitives, like uncivilised savages. Now they,re making millions but have only paid us 15 lei [around £3].


Mr Tudorache, a deeply religious grandfather who lost his arm in an accident, was one of those who feels most humiliated. For one scene, a rubber sex toy in the shape of a fist was attached to the stump of his missing arm - but he had no idea what it was.

The residents of Glod only found out about the true nature of the film after seeing a Romanian TV report. Some thought it was an art project, others a documentary.

Claudia Luca, who lives with her extended family in the house next to the one that served as Borat's home, said: 'We now realise they only came here because we are poorer than anyone else in this village. They never told us what they were doing but took advantage of our misfortune and poverty. They made us look like savages, why would anyone do that?'

Baby Lee
11-17-2006, 10:27 AM
Excellent. SBC fufilled his wish then. :clap:

All he did was hold up a mirror...
And what did that mirror show?

StcChief
11-17-2006, 10:31 AM
Insulted....

Get over it and yourself.

memyselfI
11-17-2006, 10:31 AM
And what did that mirror show?

In the movie the mirror shows that those who believe negative stereotypes about others perpetuate their own negative stereotype.

BigRedChief
11-17-2006, 10:44 AM
If it's offensive then I want to see it. This world needs more political INcorrectness than the opposite. :clap:Thats all fine and dandy. I'm not saying we should browbeat PC into our movies or pop culture. Just that making fun of peoples uneducated lot in life is not my cup of tea

Baby Lee
11-17-2006, 10:45 AM
In the movie the mirror shows that those who believe negative stereotypes about others perpetuate their own negative stereotype.
Another way of looking at it. (http://www.slate.com/id/2153578/)
I knew this would happen. I pick up my copy of the New Statesman, London's leftist weekly, to find a review of Borat, bannered on the table of contents as "Sacha Baron Cohen's exposure of crass Americana" and on the review page itself with, "The Kazakh ace reporter uncovers uncomfortable truths about the US." The author, Ryan Gilbey, proceeds to say the following:

A redneck rodeo crowd shows no compunction about cheering Borat's gung-ho speech about Iraq, clearly not realizing that what he actually said was: "We support your war of terror!" And it's shocking to witness the tacit acceptance with which Borat's ghoulish requests are greeted. Trying to find the ideal car for mowing down gypsies, or seeking the best gun for killing Jews, he encounters only compliance among America's salespeople.

Oh, come on. Among the "cultural learnings of America for make benefit glorious nation of Kazakhstan" is the discovery that Americans are almost pedantic in their hospitality and politesse. At a formal dinner in Birmingham, Ala., the guests discuss Borat while he's out of the room—filling a bag with ordure in order to bring it back to the table, as it happens—and agree what a nice young American he might make. And this is after he has called one guest a retard and grossly insulted the wife of another (and remember, it's "Americana" that is "crass"). The tony hostess even takes him and his bag of shit upstairs and demonstrates the uses not just of the water closet but also of the toilet paper. The arrival of a mountainous black hooker does admittedly put an end to the evening, but if a swarthy stranger had pulled any of the foregoing at a liberal dinner party in England, I wouldn't give much for his chances. "The violence that Borat encounters on the New York subway after trying to greet male strangers with kisses is frighteningly real," writes Gilbey, who either doesn't use the London Underground very much or else has a very low standard for mayhem.

Is it too literal-minded to point out what any viewer of the movie can see for himself—that the crowd at the rodeo stops cheering quite fast when it realizes that something is amiss; that the car salesman is extremely patient about everything from demands for pussy magnets to confessions of bankruptcy; and that the man in the gun shop won't sell the Kazakh a weapon? This is "compliance"? I have to say, I didn't like the look of the elderly couple running the Confederate-memorabilia store, but considering that Borat smashes hundreds of dollars worth of their stock, they bear up pretty well—icily correct even when declining to be paid with locks of pubic hair. The only people who are flat-out rude and patronizing to our curious foreigner are the stone-faced liberal Amazons of the Veteran Feminists of America—surely natural readers of the New Statesman. Perhaps that magazine's reviewer believes that Borat is genuinely shocked when he finds—by video viewing—that Pamela Anderson has not been faithful to him and he will thus not be the first to "make romance-explosion on her stomitch." (And either the love goddess agreed to stage the moment when Mr. Sagdiyev tries to stuff her into a "wedding bag," or she and her security team displayed a rare indulgence to the mustachioed interloper.)

The joke, in other words, may well be on the prankster. I thought the same about Da Ali G Show. As far as one can tell, most youth culture is as inarticulate and illiterate and mannerless as Sacha Baron Cohen made it out to be: The elderly dupes who did their best to respond (Gen. Brent Scowcroft on the anthrax/Tampax distinction being the most notable) were evidently resigned in advance to quite a low standard of questioning. You can see the same fixed expressions on the faces of politicians when they attend a "real" event, like Rock the Vote, where wry, likable smiles are obligatory, and the only dread is that of appearing uncool.

Having gone this far in a curmudgeonly direction, I may as well add that any act that depends too much on the scatological is in some kind of trouble. Borat—and Borat—rely on excremental humor from the very first frames. This isn't unfunny just because it's infantile and repetitive and doesn't know when to stop; it's unfunny because the revulsion produced by feces is universal and automatic and thus much too easy to exploit. This is especially true when, in a cheap knockoff of Luis Buñuel, our hero decides to introduce the unmentionable topic at the dinner table. (To be honest, I am still reeling at the relative composure of that Birmingham society lady. If I wasn't trying to change the subject, I would say that I admired her phlegm.)

In the days before he began to take himself seriously—and, even worse, to be taken seriously by others—Michael Moore was quite good at guerrilla stunts like buying slaves upon discovering that Mississippi hadn't actually ratified the 13th Amendment. The concept is essentially the same as the imperishable Black Like Me, which really did get people to say what they privately thought and felt. Kazakh Like Me has been a howling success because it has induced the luckless Kazakh government to make solemn disavowals, as if to dispel mistaken "perceptions" about horse-urine cocktails and the obligatory date rape of sisters. It's too much like Karen Hughes making nice with audiences of unsmiling Saudis, pleadingly reassuring them that the United States is not one long replay of The Running of the Muslim. But it's that attitude of painfully maintained open-mindedness and multiculturalism that is really being unmasked and satirized by our man from the 'stan. In what other country could such a character talk his way into being invited to sing the national anthem at a rodeo—where the horse urine is not so highly prized, and where horse excrement, and indeed all excrement, is still a term of abuse?

memyselfI
11-17-2006, 10:51 AM
Another way of looking at it. (http://www.slate.com/id/2153578/)

Blah, blah. Christopher Hitchens is just green with envy that he is now about as culturally relevent (in the US and UK) as New Coke. SBC, on the other hand... :hmmm:

Baby Lee
11-17-2006, 10:55 AM
Blah, blah. Christopher Hitchens is just green with envy that he is now about as culturally relevent (in the US and UK) as New Coke. SBC, on the other hand... :hmmm:
Well that's a scathing and altogether convincing counter-argument. ROFL

ferrarispider95
11-17-2006, 11:13 AM
"For one scene, a rubber sex toy in the shape of a fist was attached to the stump of his missing arm - but he had no idea what it was. "
ROFL
Ok, I am going to see the movie tonight.

Chiefnj
11-17-2006, 11:22 AM
Not tryi ng to start a fight. Just providing the entire picture.

You portray it as a bunch of star-effers who just want some scratch, but the article points out;

I'm not fighting, I just don't believe the people really thought it was a documentary. They were asked to do ridiculous things and things that they don't ever do - like have children run around with machine guns, bring cattle into their homes, have women carry men around on carts, have an oxen pull a run down car being "driven" by an 8 year old with a cigarette in his hand, doing funny dances with Borat, etc. They are smart enough to realize they should have asked for more money and probably could have gotten more money.

memyselfI
11-17-2006, 11:31 AM
Well that's a scathing and altogether convincing counter-argument. ROFL

It wasn't a counter at all. It was an observation. If I cared about what Christopher Hitchens thought about the movie then I might address his points but I really could care less.

Baby Lee
11-17-2006, 11:39 AM
It wasn't a counter at all. It was an observation. If I cared about what Christopher Hitchens thought about the movie then I might address his points but I really could care less.
Fine, then I'll say it. Borat's antics generally don't unveil the average American's bigotry. More often, it shows their unfailing politeness.

memyselfI
11-17-2006, 11:42 AM
Fine, then I'll say it. Borat's antics generally don't unveil the average American's bigotry. More often, it shows their unfailing politeness.

In typical Hitchens (BL?) fashion he misses the point...

Borat's antics show BOTH. For the face of bigotry isn't always a rude one. :rolleyes:

CoMoChief
11-17-2006, 12:01 PM
Borat is one of the funniest movies I have seen in a long time.

BigRedChief
11-17-2006, 12:01 PM
abc news article:
Villagers say they will kill Borat with their bare hands if they see him again.
http://abcnews.go.com/International/Entertainment/story?id=2659018&page=1

Lzen
11-17-2006, 12:41 PM
Yeah I'd say it's a must see. Here just check out this little trailer and give it a chance to marinate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhiJZmxtll8

That's kinda funny. Seeing feminists get all uptight is great. But check out this one. The very end made me LOL.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvV1S7U5p4A&mode=related&search=

Pitt Gorilla
11-17-2006, 12:47 PM
abc news article:
Villagers say they will kill Borat with their bare hands if they see him again.
http://abcnews.go.com/International/Entertainment/story?id=2659018&page=1
That would certainly show the world community how much of a misrepresentation the movie really was!

Baby Lee
11-17-2006, 12:55 PM
In typical Hitchens (BL?) fashion he misses the point...

Borat's antics show BOTH. For the face of bigotry isn't always a rude one. :rolleyes:
Ahh yes, the tried and true, ultra squiggly "some people [wink, wink] are real bigots, though they don't come out and say it. Oh, and I won't state with specificity whom I'm talking about, but [wink, wink] you know who."

Saulbadguy
11-17-2006, 12:56 PM
Borat is pretty much Andy Kaufman. Genius.

memyselfI
11-17-2006, 12:58 PM
That's kinda funny. Seeing feminists get all uptight is great. But check out this one. The very end made me LOL.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvV1S7U5p4A&mode=related&search=

I liked it when Borat asks the etiquette coach if he should show pictures of his family... ROFL