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pr_capone
12-19-2006, 02:59 AM
Just finished watching their year in review.

They did a piece on remembering all the people who passed this year.. Puckett, Heyworth, Tiger Wood's dad. BUT NO LAMAR!

WTF?!?!?! Tiger Wood's dad deserves a mention but Lamar doesnt?!?!?

ESPN can lick my sack. I'll leave it unwashed for the next few weeks jus for when they lick it.

BASTAGES!

Guru
12-19-2006, 03:00 AM
This does not surprise me in the least.

Buck
12-19-2006, 03:03 AM
That show is a rerun from the beginning of Last Week, he hadn't died yet when they made it.

pr_capone
12-19-2006, 03:05 AM
That show is a rerun from the beginning of Last Week, he hadn't died yet when they made it.

AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

Well ****... they still could have edited him in. Thats what they have interns for dammit!

KcMizzou
12-19-2006, 03:08 AM
That show is a rerun from the beginning of Last Week, he hadn't died yet when they made it.Yeah, my first thought was that it was recorded before he passed.

Buck
12-19-2006, 03:13 AM
Yeah, I mean I dont know how often they air reruns of the show, but if its a lot then they should put him in there.

Simplex3
12-19-2006, 06:27 AM
ESPN can still lick pr_capone's sack for the many, many other retarted (sic) things they do.

Oh Snap
12-19-2006, 11:32 AM
whoa how did buckinkaeding get all that rep???

FAX
12-19-2006, 11:34 AM
whoa how did buckinkaeding get all that rep???

He's been kissing ass bigtime among the N00b (sp?) population and calling out other dolt fans and making a big deal out of it, Mr. Oh Snap. He does not, however, deserve any rep whatsoever because he called Gillian a hermaphrodite which is, of course, the lowest form of blasphemy.

FAX

FAX
12-19-2006, 11:36 AM
Who was that guy who owned the Giants? When he passed on, it was covered by the media like the death of Princess Di.

Lamar is not getting the national attention he deserves.

FAX

htismaqe
12-19-2006, 11:36 AM
Who was that guy who owned the Giants? When he passed on, it was covered by the media like the death of Princess Di.

Lamar is not getting the national attention he deserves.

FAX

Wellington Mara.

FAX
12-19-2006, 11:41 AM
Wellington Mara.

That's him. Thanks, Mr. htismaqe. He seemed like a nice guy and all, but his accomplishments paled in comparison to Lamar's.

It's as if Mr. mac58 is heading up the programming division at ESPN.

FAX

Oh Snap
12-19-2006, 11:42 AM
He's been kissing ass bigtime among the N00b (sp?) population and calling out other dolt fans and making a big deal out of it, Mr. Oh Snap. He does not, however, deserve any rep whatsoever because he called Gillian a hermaphrodite which is, of course, the lowest form of blasphemy.

FAX
HAHAHA Thats outright BLASHEMY!!!
I have so little rep compared to his and ive been on this board alot longer. I guess that means im the one with the life. I cant even remember who gave it to me. chiefer?.. thechiefs? something like that. It was one person alone who revitalized my rep. LOL Somthing like that. Ppl here thought I was a troll. So they kept giveing me bad rep. Those bastards!

htismaqe
12-19-2006, 11:45 AM
That's him. Thanks, Mr. htismaqe. He seemed like a nice guy and all, but his accomplishments paled in comparison to Lamar's.

It's as if Mr. mac58 is heading up the programming division at ESPN.

FAX

You know, I never thought about it until now, but I wonder if there's still so die-hard NFL blue bloods that resent what Lamar did?

htismaqe
12-19-2006, 11:46 AM
HAHAHA Thats outright BLASHEMY!!!
I have so little rep compared to his and ive been on this board alot longer. I guess that means im the one with the life. I cant even remember who gave it to me. chiefer?.. thechiefs? something like that. It was one person alone who revitalized my rep. LOL Somthing like that. Ppl here thought I was a troll. So they kept giveing me bad rep. Those bastards!

Check your rep now.

FAX
12-19-2006, 11:53 AM
You know, I never thought about it until now, but I wonder if there's still so die-hard NFL blue bloods that resent what Lamar did?

Possibly, I hadn't considered that either, Mr. htismaqe. But it is possible.

I've always subscribed to the theory that the small- to mid-market teams don't get attention because the audience size doesn't warrant it. But, in Lamar's case, one would think that that excuse wouldn't apply.

I can understand why the media would ignore the Chiefs, but I don't understand why they would choose to ignore Lamar's passing to this extent. In that sense, it does raise questions.

FAX

Demonpenz
12-19-2006, 11:56 AM
I don't watch espn anymore exept to wack off watching linda cone

Calcountry
12-19-2006, 11:58 AM
Wellington Mara.He was from the NFL.

htismaqe
12-19-2006, 12:02 PM
He was from the NFL.

Yeah, I brought that up.

Oh Snap
12-19-2006, 12:04 PM
Check your rep now.
lol thank you all for showin some love to a fellow chiefs fan!

Simplex3
12-19-2006, 02:07 PM
Wellington Mara.
I believe that many people said they were going to murder the next person to say that name.

pr_capone
12-19-2006, 03:42 PM
I don't watch espn anymore exept to wack off watching linda cone
:eek:

vailpass
12-19-2006, 04:27 PM
That's him. Thanks, Mr. htismaqe. He seemed like a nice guy and all, but his accomplishments paled in comparison to Lamar's.

It's as if Mr. mac58 is heading up the programming division at ESPN.

FAX

I'm sorry FAX but this is way, way off base. Wellington Mara made the NFL what it is today by instituting the practice that sets it apart from all other pro sports: revenue sharing. Read his bio, I think once you see the facts you will agree Mr. Mara was a Giant in his field. This in no way detracts from Lamar Hunt's legacy.

Giants owner Wellington Mara dies at age 89
By Dave Goldberg, AP Football Writer
NEW YORK — Every NFL fan owes a huge debt to Wellington Mara, who died Tuesday at 89. So does every owner, executive and player. Mara, who joined the New York Giants as a ballboy the day his father purchased the team 80 years ago and became co-owner as a teenager, was the face of the franchise for more than a half century.

But he also was the patriarch of the NFL, a man who was willing for more than 40 years to split the millions in television revenues he could have made in the nation's largest market with the Green Bays and Pittsburghs of the league.
It put the NFL at the top of America's sports hierarchy.

"He shaped nearly every rule and philosophy we have in our league today," said Ernie Accorsi, the Giants general manager. "Most of all, he was the moral conscience of the National Football League. He now joins the pantheon of incredible men who made this league what it has become."

Said commissioner Paul Tagliabue: "Wellington Mara represented the heart and soul of the National Football League. He was a man of deep conviction who stood as a beacon of integrity. When Well Mara stood to speak at a league meeting, the room would become silent with anticipation because all of us knew we were going to hear profound insights born of eight decades of league experience."

The last of the NFL's founding generation, Mara, elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1997, died of cancer at his home in Rye, the team said.

One of Mara's greatest contributions came in the early 1960s when he and brother Jack agreed to share television revenue on a league wide basis soon after Pete Rozelle became commissioner. That deal allowed the NFL to thrive and remains in place today.

"Wellington Mara was a true pioneer who understood what it took to make the National Football League great," said Gene Upshaw, executive director of the NFL Players Association. "History will show that his vision, integrity and willingness to share with small market clubs paved the way for economic success."

In 1989, Mara and group of older owners wanted Rozelle's successor to be Jim Finks, then the New Orleans general manager, rather than Tagliabue, then a league lawyer. Mara thought the league should be run by a football man.

But Mara and several other "old-guard" owners finally agreed to break a stalemate of four months by throwing their votes to Tagliabue. Mara became one of the new commissioner's staunchest supporters, a man Tagliabue often leaned on for advice.

Mara became a Giants' ballboy at age 9 on Oct. 18, 1925 after his father, Timothy J. Mara, bought the team. He stayed fully involved in New York's operation for almost 80 years, except for the three years he served in the Navy during World War II. Until he became ill last spring, he attended most practices and every game.

In 1930, at 14, his father made him co-owner with older brother Jack.

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/giants/2005-10-25-mara-obit_x.htm

dirk digler
12-19-2006, 04:34 PM
I'm sorry FAX but this is way, way off base. Wellington Mara made the NFL what it is today by instituting the practice that sets it apart from all other pro sports: revenue sharing. Read his bio, I think once you see the facts you will agree Mr. Mara was a Giant in his field. This in no way detracts from Lamar Hunt's legacy.



Big deal IMHO. Lamar shared revenue when he created the AFL, he even gave his OWN money to other teams so they wouldn't go under. Hell he even gave the Raiders one of our QB's because they didn't have one. That would never happen in this day and age.

FAX
12-19-2006, 04:35 PM
I'm sorry FAX but this is way, way off base. Wellington Mara made the NFL what it is today by instituting the practice that sets it apart from all other pro sports: revenue sharing. Read his bio, I think once you see the facts you will agree Mr. Mara was a Giant in his field. This in no way detracts from Lamar Hunt's legacy.

Thanks for posting, Mr. vailpass. I appreciate the information and the knowledge gained.

FAX

DaWolf
12-19-2006, 04:36 PM
Possibly, I hadn't considered that either, Mr. htismaqe. But it is possible.

I've always subscribed to the theory that the small- to mid-market teams don't get attention because the audience size doesn't warrant it. But, in Lamar's case, one would think that that excuse wouldn't apply.

I can understand why the media would ignore the Chiefs, but I don't understand why they would choose to ignore Lamar's passing to this extent. In that sense, it does raise questions.

FAX

You've also got to remember that Lamar and his family are quite low key and Lamar never really wanted the focus on him so I am sure a lot of this has to do with that and his family. Lamar would have wanted the focus to remain on the games. A lot of these media outlets depend on the family and the team putting out statements and and tributes and such and they pick them up. Otherwise, what more can you do other than the tributes you've already aired? The family in fact may have encouraged the outlets not to focus too much on it...

FAX
12-19-2006, 04:41 PM
Big deal IMHO. Lamar shared revenue when he created the AFL, he even gave his OWN money to other teams so they wouldn't go under. Hell he even gave the Raiders one of our QB's because they didn't have one. That would never happen in this day and age.

I think if you were keeping score, Lamar's accomplishments would outweigh Mara's, Mr. dirk digler. But, that level of homerism is beyond even my utterly shameless reach.

Still, the fact is they were both good men and important to the evolution of the NFL. It doesn't excuse or explain why Mara get's more attention than Lamar, though.

It's a puzzler.

FAX

dirk digler
12-19-2006, 04:48 PM
I think if you were keeping score, Lamar's accomplishments would outweigh Mara's, Mr. dirk digler. But, that level of homerism is beyond even my utterly shameless reach.

Still, the fact is they were both good men and important to the evolution of the NFL. It doesn't excuse or explain why Mara get's more attention than Lamar, though.

It's a puzzler.

FAX

I am not being a homer, it is the truth. The only reason Mara got all the hype is because he ran the New York Football Giants.

FAX
12-19-2006, 04:54 PM
I am not being a homer, it is the truth. The only reason Mara got all the hype is because he ran the New York Football Giants.

I wasn't suggesting you were a homer, Mr. dirk digler. Rather, I was stating that I am. And darn proud of it, too.

I think you're right about the New York franchise, though. As I said earlier, I can understand why the Chiefs garner little attention - we suck. But, Lamar's another story. He deserves better.

FAX

vailpass
12-19-2006, 04:56 PM
Big deal IMHO. Lamar shared revenue when he created the AFL, he even gave his OWN money to other teams so they wouldn't go under. Hell he even gave the Raiders one of our QB's because they didn't have one. That would never happen in this day and age.

Mara instituted the policy of revenue sharing when he, as a NY owner, was in a position to benefit most from preventing it. Mara could easily have been the NFL Steinbrenner but cared more about the game.
Hunt accomplished some great things but revenue sharing was not among them.

Read Mara's bio, he became an owner when he was 14 years old and built the NFL.

Skip Towne
12-19-2006, 04:57 PM
I liked the AFL far better than the NFL.. Lots more scoring, two point conversion, names on the back of the jersey. The NFL wa stodgy by comparison. I was pissed to see the merger. I wanted the AFL to run them out of town.

dirk digler
12-19-2006, 04:58 PM
I wasn't suggesting you were a homer, Mr. dirk digler. Rather, I was stating that I am. And darn proud of it, too.

I think you're right about the New York franchise, though. As I said earlier, I can understand why the Chiefs garner little attention - we suck. But, Lamar's another story. He deserves better.

FAX

Lamar definitely deserves better and I am homer as well but maybe not as much as you. :p

dirk digler
12-19-2006, 05:06 PM
Mara instituted the policy of revenue sharing when he, as a NY owner, was in a position to benefit most from preventing it. Mara could easily have been the NFL Steinbrenner but cared more about the game.
Hunt accomplished some great things but revenue sharing was not among them.

Read Mara's bio, he became an owner when he was 14 years old and built the NFL.

As always a Donkey fan talking out his ass.

In formulating the AFL television contract, Hunt copied an idea from baseball's Branch Rickey, who was trying to start a third major league, the Continental League, and pool two-thirds of TV revenue. The idea became the framework for current NFL revenue sharing.

'Hamas' Jenkins
12-19-2006, 05:39 PM
Mara instituted the policy of revenue sharing when he, as a NY owner, was in a position to benefit most from preventing it. Mara could easily have been the NFL Steinbrenner but cared more about the game.
Hunt accomplished some great things but revenue sharing was not among them.

Read Mara's bio, he became an owner when he was 14 years old and built the NFL.


Where do you think he got the idea, you dumb sonofabitch?


I would also like to point out that ESPN's #1 news story of the year was not the Tour de France scandal, not the Rose Bowl game, not the travails of Toothlessberger, not Tiger Woods winning two majors, not the US international teams falling flat on their face, but rather the T.O. suicide attempt. If that isn't a reason to stop watching ESPN, I don't know what is.

vailpass
12-19-2006, 09:13 PM
As always a Donkey fan talking out his ass.

You might want to link your sources from now on. Like this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_Mara

"During the early 1960s, Wellington and his brother Jack, the owners of the NFL's largest market, agreed to share television revenue on a league-wide basis, dividing the amounts of money available in cities like New York with smaller market teams such as the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Green Bay Packers. That concept of revenue sharing allowed the NFL to grow and is still being used today. This is certainly Mara's lasting contribution to his game."

Perhaps you need a bit of a cooling off period before you can discuss issues related to Hunt in a rational manner. It is no insult to Hunt's legacy to acknowledge the multiple accomplishments Mara achieved in his 8 decades of ownership.

vailpass
12-19-2006, 09:14 PM
Where do you think he got the idea, you dumb sonofabitch?


I would also like to point out that ESPN's #1 news story of the year was not the Tour de France scandal, not the Rose Bowl game, not the travails of Toothlessberger, not Tiger Woods winning two majors, not the US international teams falling flat on their face, but rather the T.O. suicide attempt. If that isn't a reason to stop watching ESPN, I don't know what is.

Are you implying he got the idea from Hunt? Sources please. Why the name calling? You act like I tried to corner the silver market.

dirk digler
12-19-2006, 09:23 PM
You might want to link your sources from now on. Like this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_Mara

"During the early 1960s, Wellington and his brother Jack, the owners of the NFL's largest market, agreed to share television revenue on a league-wide basis, dividing the amounts of money available in cities like New York with smaller market teams such as the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Green Bay Packers. That concept of revenue sharing allowed the NFL to grow and is still being used today. This is certainly Mara's lasting contribution to his game."

Perhaps you need a bit of a cooling off period before you can discuss issues related to Hunt in a rational manner. It is no insult to Hunt's legacy to acknowledge the multiple accomplishments Mara achieved in his 8 decades of ownership.

I am not trying to discredit Mara he was a great owner but he didn't have nearly the impact on the game as Lamar did.

It just pisses me off when we get the love fest for Mara and all day coverage from ESPN and what not but little for Lamar.

Here is some links to educate you:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/football/bears/cs-061213lamarobit,1,1336318.story?coll=chi-sportstop-hed






http://www.startribune.com/503/story/875334.html

Hunt -- despite being the heir to a giant oil fortune -- had a bit of socialism in him. He embraced an idea once promoted by zany baseball impresario Bill Veeck and then espoused by Continental League founder Branch Rickey.

•Here's the concept: All teams in a league should share network television money equally. That was the system that the Continental League would have used had it started play. It's the economic system the AFL employed when Hunt formed it.

•Soon, the old-line NFL adopted such a revenue-sharing idea, thus allowing franchises in markets the size of Minneapolis-St. Paul or, even, Green Bay, to compete favorably with the New Yorks and Chicagos of the sports world.

All thanks to Lamar Hunt, a sports business Hall o Famer, to be sure, who died Wednesday night at the age of 74.

dirk digler
12-19-2006, 09:42 PM
Damn valipass I am straight up owning your ass


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Football_League

The NFL adopted many ideas introduced by the AFL, including names on player jerseys and revenue sharing of gate and television receipts. The older league also adopted the practice of using the stadium scoreboard clocks to keep track of the official game time, instead of just having a stop watch used by the referee. The AFL also introduced the two-point conversion to professional football thirty-four years before the NFL instituted it in 1994 (college football had adopted the two point conversion in the late 1950s). The AFL's challenge to the NFL also laid the groundwork for the Super Bowl, which has become the standard for championship contests.

Hunt's vision not only brought a new professional football league to California and New York, but introduced the sport to Colorado, restored it to Texas and later to fast-growing Florida, as well as bringing it to New England for the first time in 12 years. In addition, the AFL also adopted the first-ever cooperative television plan for professional football, in which the league office negotiated an ABC-TV contract, the proceeds of which were divided equally among member clubs.

Three NFL franchises were awarded as a direct result of the AFL's competition with the older league: the Vikings, who were awarded to Max Winter in exchange for dropping his bid to join the AFL; the Falcons, whose franchise went to Rankin Smith to dissuade him from purchasing the AFL's Miami Dolphins; and the Saints, because of successful anti-trust legislation supported by several Louisiana politicians, which let the two leagues merge.

Given the furious battle for playing talent, the AFL's arrival helped many black players from small colleges helped broaden the talent base for players who subsequently contributed to the sport.[2][3]

Another feature of the American Football League was its competitive balance. In the original eight-team league, in a fourteen game schedule, each team played every other team twice. Every team had the same "strength of schedule", so the division champions were clearly the best teams in each division. However a team that finished second in one division could have a better record than the team with the best record in the other division, while playing the same schedule. An example of this occurred in 1963, when the Raiders finished second in the West with a 10-4 record, while Boston won the East (after playing a playoff game) with a record of 7-6-1. Further, the league championships were evenly divided: five were won by Western Division teams, five by the Eastern Division; and of the original eight teams, all but two (Denver and Boston) won at least one AFL title, and only one (Denver) did not make the playoffs at some time during the league's ten-year existence.

dirk digler
12-19-2006, 09:51 PM
http://www.remembertheafl.com/LamarHunt.htm


Hunt finally caught on to the NFL’s conservatism, and decided to start a league of his own. The result was the American Football League, one of the most successful American professional sports leagues of all time, and the true genesis of modern professional football. National network television of all league games? Revenue sharing of home receipts and television income? Moving cameras instead of static fifty-yard-line shots? Miked-up players? Recruiting small black colleges? Two-point touchdown conversions? Names on players’ jerseys? A clock on the scoreboard, so that fans knew the time remaining? Flashy offenses instead of three yards and a cloud of dust? A Thanksgiving Day game in a different city every year? All those innovations were made by Hunt’s brainchild, the AFL.

dirk digler
12-20-2006, 08:37 AM
bump for Vali

vailpass
12-20-2006, 09:00 AM
I am not trying to discredit Mara he was a great owner but he didn't have nearly the impact on the game as Lamar did.

It just pisses me off when we get the love fest for Mara and all day coverage from ESPN and what not but little for Lamar.

Here is some links to educate you:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/football/bears/cs-061213lamarobit,1,1336318.story?coll=chi-sportstop-hed

The reason Mara gets more run than Hunt is he was there first and was there longer. Mara lived in the city with his team, Hunt was a visitor on game day. Hunt made strong contributions to the entity that Mara and his peers built. Your homerism is showing through big and loud when you say things like 'Mara didn't make near the contributions Hunt did'.
This is a KC board so you certainly have the right to your narrow and homerish view but you should recognize it for what it is. The rest of the country is more balanced thus the media coverage when Mara took the dirt nap was much more extensive than when hunt cornered that Great Silver Market in the sky.

stevieray
12-20-2006, 09:02 AM
The reason Mara gets more run than Hunt is he was there first and was there longer. Mara lived in the city with his team, Hunt was a visitor on game day. Hunt made strong contributions to the entity that Mara and his peers built. Your homerism is showing through big and loud when you say things like 'Mara didn't make near the contributions Hunt did'.
This is a KC board so you certainly have the right to your narrow and homerish view but you should recognize it for what it is. The rest of the country is more balanced thus the media coverage when Mara took the dirt nap was much more extensive than when hunt went to that Great Silver Market in the sky.


That's your second back-handed stab at Lamar.

Not very gracious, considering the man brought football to Colorado.

vailpass
12-20-2006, 09:03 AM
That's your second back handed stab at Lamar.

not very gracious, considering the man brought football to Colorado.

Please show me where I spoke incorrectly.

stevieray
12-20-2006, 09:06 AM
Please show me where I spoke incorrectly.

using a failed past business adventure right after his death is bad form.

It's just my opinion.

vailpass
12-20-2006, 09:14 AM
using a failed past business adventure right after his death is bad form.

It's just my opinion.

It isn't just a failed business venture if it results in criminal charges and the payment of a substantial fine. Out of respect for your wishes I'll drop the subject.

dirk digler
12-20-2006, 09:26 AM
The reason Mara gets more run than Hunt is he was there first and was there longer. Mara lived in the city with his team, Hunt was a visitor on game day. Hunt made strong contributions to the entity that Mara and his peers built. Your homerism is showing through big and loud when you say things like 'Mara didn't make near the contributions Hunt did'.
This is a KC board so you certainly have the right to your narrow and homerish view but you should recognize it for what it is. The rest of the country is more balanced thus the media coverage when Mara took the dirt nap was much more extensive than when hunt cornered that Great Silver Market in the sky.

Huh I just gave you 3 articles pointing out that Lamar brought revenue sharing long before Mara did and the AFL had most of their league ideas implented into the new NFL. All because of one man...Lamar Hunt.

I am not dissing Mara but Lamar Hunt built the NFL into what it is today. Read Paul Tagilabues comment or Roger Goddell's or any other NFL guy and they will tell the same thing. If it wasn't for Lamar the NFL wouldn't be what it is today.

Mara/NFL didn't want a team in Denver but Lamar did. THat means no team in Denver so think about that before you spout off again.