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View Full Version : Mark Cuban: Love Him or Hate Him


PinkFloyd
12-20-2006, 06:56 PM
Just wanted to get the general idea of what people thought of the man who runs the Dallas Maverick's??? One thing I like about the man, is that he's a fan... You will never see him setting up there in his suite sipping wine and eatting fish eggs... He's always courtside yelling and screaming his head off...

Would you want a man like this running the Chiefs or Royals??? He's probably the most outspoken man in all of sports...

UteChief
12-20-2006, 06:58 PM
I think he's a stud and the sportsworld would be better off with more owners like him. I love the fact that he called out Stern on the poor officiating and puts pressure where it's needed.

Ari Chi3fs
12-20-2006, 07:00 PM
I have personally messaged him twice pertaining to him buying the Royals from Glass. Heh. He wants the Cubs.

The guy owns. I love his site, www.blogmaverick.com

OnTheWarpath58
12-20-2006, 07:03 PM
I can't stand Pro Basketball......

But for some reason, if I'm flipping channels and the Mavs are playing, I watch for a bit.

He reminds me of Howard Stern in the respect of people waiting to see what he's gonna say/do next.....

Deberg_1990
12-20-2006, 07:05 PM
I like his passion and love for the game.

He needs to act a little more professional though considering his position.

PinkFloyd
12-20-2006, 07:08 PM
He's got the greatest job in the world... He's a fan -- and an owner of a pro sports franchise...

If I could come up with an enormous chunk of money -- I'd be shopping for a team to buy... To bad he couldn't buy another franchise and move it to the new Sprint Arena...

Braincase
12-20-2006, 08:00 PM
Dear Mr. Cuban,

Please buy the Royals.

Sincerely,

Everyone

jspchief
12-20-2006, 08:02 PM
I used to be a big fan, but his act in last year's play-offs have me rethinking my opinion of him. He was a total distraction for his team.

I love his passion but think he needs to learn how to channel it properly.

OnTheWarpath58
12-20-2006, 08:05 PM
I used to be a big fan, but his act in last year's play-offs have me rethinking my opinion of him. He was a total distraction for his team.

I love his passion but think he needs to learn how to channel it properly.

What did he do?

Rain Man
12-20-2006, 08:07 PM
I like owners like him. I get the impression that he actually cares about the team.

I'm not sure what jspchief's story is, but overall, I'd love to have an owner who is an avid fan. Is Clark?

chiefs4me
12-20-2006, 09:51 PM
Love him..great owner and just a regular fan..

JonesCrusher
12-20-2006, 09:55 PM
Great guy, I heard that he pays his fines with pennies just to be a pain in the bunghole. We need more owners like him.

Frazod
12-20-2006, 09:56 PM
It seems like he's rich enough that he (unlike most owners) sees the team as something to feed his ego rather than line his pockets. This seems like a desirable trait in the owner of one's team.

JSP has a point about him being a destraction - especially when things are going bad, the team would be much better off if he was ranting and raving in a skybox instead of courtside. But at least he CARES. I certainly don't get that feeling from our current ownership.

L.A. Chieffan
12-20-2006, 11:04 PM
As a Laker fan I hate when he talks crap and whines. (Although his banter back and forth with Phil Jackson can sometimes be quite amusing). I give him props for how much enthusiasm he brings to the game and how he has COMPLETLY turned around the Mavs. The team used to be GARBAGE. A Dallas game used to be a joke, now they compete at the the top level. (Lakers still own their asses though) :D

dtebbe
12-20-2006, 11:25 PM
I just love the fact that he made his millions by selling Yahoo his worthless turd broadcast.com

Talk about an operation held together with bailing wire and bubble gum...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcast.com

I was involved with adding about 8 CNN feeds to audionet in 1996. They didn't really have a clue as to what they were doing. A real dot-com bubble story. Yahoo basically has nothing to show for thier $5.7 billion (gag choke)

DT

L.A. Chieffan
12-21-2006, 12:16 AM
I just love the fact that he made his millions by selling Yahoo his worthless turd broadcast.com

Talk about an operation held together with bailing wire and bubble gum...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcast.com

I was involved with adding about 8 CNN feeds to audionet in 1996. They didn't really have a clue as to what they were doing. A real dot-com bubble story. Yahoo basically has nothing to show for thier $5.7 billion (gag choke)

DT
Hmmm. I thought I remember seeing a 60 minutes story about Cuban that said HE created audionet so HE could listen to Indiana Hoosier games on the internet. Was that all bullshit? Did Morley Safer lie to me?!?!?!

|Zach|
12-21-2006, 12:27 AM
I like the guy a lot...some of his writings have been a big inspiration in some of the things I am trying to do business\photography wise.

(Via BlogMaverick)

In basketball you have to shoot 50pct. If you make an extra 10 shots per hundred, you are an All-Star. In baseball you have to get a hit 30 pct of the time. If you get an extra 10 hits per hundred at bats, you are on the cover of every magazine, lead off every SportsCenter and make the Hall of Fame.

In Business, the odds are a little different. You don't have to break the Mendoza line (hitting .200). In fact, it doesnt matter how many times you strike out. In business, to be a success, you only have to be right once.

One single solitary time and you are set for life. That's the beauty of the business world.

I like to tell the story of how I started my first business at age 12, selling garbage bags. No one ever has asked if I was any good or made money at it. I was, and I did...enough to buy some tennis shoes :).

I like to tell the story of how I started up a bar, Motley's Pub when I wasn't even of legal drinking age the summer before my senior year at Indiana University. No one really asks me how it turned out. It was great until we got busted for letting a 16-year-old win a wet t-shirt contest (I swear I checked her ID, and it was good!).

No one really asks me about my adventures working for Mellon Bank, or Tronics 2000, or trying to start a business selling powdered milk (it was cheaper by the gallon, and I thought it tasted good). They don't ask me about working as a bartender at night at Elans when I first got to Dallas, or getting fired from my job at Your Business Software for wanting to close a sale rather than sweeping the floor and opening up the store.

No ever asked me about what it was like when I started MicroSolutions and how I used to count the months I was in business, hoping to outlast my previous endeavors and make this one a success.

With every effort, I learned a lot. With every mistake and failure, not only mine, but of those around me, I learned what not to do. I also got to study the success of those I did business with as well. I had more than a healthy dose of fear, and an unlimited amount of hope, and more importantly, no limit on time and effort.

Fortunately, things turned out well for me with MicroSolutions. I sold it after 7 years and made enough money to take time off and have a whole lot of fun.

Back then I can remember vividly people telling me how lucky I was to sell my business at the right time.

Then when I took that money and started trading technology stocks that were in the areas that MIcroSolutions focused on. I remember vividly being told how lucky I was to have expertise in such a hot area, as technology stocks started to trade up.

Of course, no one wanted to comment on how lucky I was to spend time reading software manuals, or Cisco Router manuals, or sitting in my house testing and comparing new technologies, but that's a topic for another blog post.

The point of all this is that it doesn't matter how many times you fail. It doesn't matter how many times you almost get it right. No one is going to know or care about your failures, and either should you. All you have to do is learn from them and those around you because...

All that matters in business is that you get it right once.

Then everyone can tell you how lucky you are.

Swanman
12-21-2006, 07:11 AM
I like Cuban a lot. He's an owner that's a fan first and a businessman second. I'd love it if he bought the Cubs, the team would finally have ownership deadset on winning for once. Also, I think he's done a real nice job with the HDNet channels, especially HDNet Movies.

CupidStunt
12-21-2006, 07:16 AM
The ideal owner: willing to spend, interested in the team, knows that he needs to allow the right people to make the right decisions.

He's willing to spend and passionate. The question is whether or not he's too hands-on.

A great example of this type of owner would be Bob Kraft. An example of an owner who has two of the qualities but fails miserably in the third is Jerry Jones.

Skip Towne
12-21-2006, 07:35 AM
I hate the NBA but he seems like a good guy. I saw a TV piece on him where he took a small group of people out on the town in Dallas and several clubs wouldn't let them in........even when he told them who he was. What is that all about?

ck_IN
12-21-2006, 07:57 AM
He does show a passion for his team and its sport so I have to admire that. I'll probably get flamed for speaking ill of Lamar Hunt right now but I've always got the impression that as long as the bottom line was good then Lamar was good.

Would I want Cuban as my owner? Not really. That passion sometimes crosses the line and becomes a detriment. Jerry Jones is a lesser example. I'd prefer something in the middle of Hunt and Cuban. The closet thing I can think of is the Rooney's in Pittsburgh.

PunkinDrublic
12-21-2006, 09:08 AM
Dude singlehandedly turned me into a Mavs fan. I have friends who have waited tables on Cuban and say that he's real down to earth and treats everyone the same. It was only a few years ago the Mavs were competing with the clippers for the worst team in the league. Even though we lost a finals we should have won, there was such an exciting buzz around town and it was awesome.

I am glad Cuban is speaking out against the horrendous officiating system that is present in the NBA. We're talking about officials who have been reffing games for years and blatantly give calls to superstar players and make calls against people they don't like. These are refs who have been beneficiaries of a good old boy network for years and David Stern doesn't seem to hold them accountable. As a result, the NBA has the worst officiating personell in sports IMO.

ck_IN
12-21-2006, 09:13 AM
<i>officials who have been reffing games for years and blatantly give calls to superstar players</i>

You mean like the Jordan rules we used to have?

I'm not a fan of watching basketball but the game and the NBA in particular has become unwatchable. The concept of defense is gone. All anyone seems to want to do is dunk. A blocked shot means swatting it 10 rows deep in the stands and then mugging about how bad you are. And then we have officials who seem to think the game is about them.

All in all, take in a high school game. It's a much better product.

geronimo
12-21-2006, 10:36 AM
i live in dallas. its been interesting to observe his influence and relative success compared to that of jerry jones versus the stars/rangers contingent. one thing for sure is that he absolutely loves the game which i think is pretty important. the other is he is a very astute business man. lastly he's not afraid to take a risk (remember dennis rodman a few years back). the winners put their money where their mouth is! both jones and cuban take care of their players and coaches (althoug don nelson has said some ugly things about cuban of late). i admire their commitment to winning. one thing i've heard alot since Mr. Hunt's death is that he was very committed to the success of the NFL even over and above that of his franchise. which is noble but part of me would rather have a superbowl win -- in my lifetime. cuban is more al davis without as much of the weirdness altho cuban is a bit strange himself.

DJJasonp
12-21-2006, 11:58 AM
I think the best way to judge him is by asking his players how they feel about him....and from what I've seen in interviews, tv pieces, etc....his players love playing for him (he takes care of them).

His team always has the best equipment, perks, travel conditions, etc. etc.....that says something about how much he cares about what he owns - and how bad he wants to win.

Mr. K was a lot like him (very competitive). From stories I've heard, Mr. K would overspend to gain any advantage he could to beat the yankees.

You gotta love owners that are fans (Mr. Hunt included)

Redrum_69
12-21-2006, 11:59 AM
Basketball on the Chiefs forum?!?!?