PDA

View Full Version : Exit Interviews


Chiefnj
01-09-2007, 10:25 AM
During Kawicka's interview where he said some players didn't take thing seriously, he was asked and said that Herm was not conducting exit interviews with the players.

I don't know the percentage of teams that do, or don't hold such meetings. I'm just wondering what people think about exit interviews and the 2006 Chiefs.

Do people think Herm should have had such meetings with the players? Could he have learned some things from them? Or, did Herm do the right thing; he knows enough from 17 games and it is going to be his way or the highway in any event.

MichaelH
01-09-2007, 10:30 AM
It appears that Herm doesn't have a clue so whatever he does is wrong.

Stewie
01-09-2007, 10:33 AM
He also said DV didn't do exit interviews. In fact, he said he was never in DV's office except to tell him of an injury. I'm not sure how common the practice is, but it would be good to let the players voice their opinions.

Chiefnj
01-09-2007, 10:38 AM
He also said DV didn't do exit interviews. In fact, he said he was never in DV's office except to tell him of an injury. I'm not sure how common the practice is, but it would be good to let the players voice their opinions.

You are correct. I try not to bring the old coaching regime into discussions, however DV did not do exit interviews either. In hindsight, perhaps speaking with defensive personnel would have been a wise move for Vermeil; then again Dick probably would have broken into hysterics after the 2nd "Why is Greg Robinson our coach??"

HonestChieffan
01-09-2007, 10:39 AM
And what pray tell would he learn from an "exit interview" that he doesnt already know?

chagrin
01-09-2007, 10:40 AM
The walk out is never as rewarding as the walk in

Chiefnj
01-09-2007, 10:42 AM
And what pray tell would he learn from an "exit interview" that he doesnt already know?

Apparently he never heard of the issue regarding the predictability of the offense.

InChiefsHell
01-09-2007, 10:43 AM
I got the impression that Herm talks to the players, but maybe not in such a formal way. Who knows. I don't know how much difference it would make, based on his demeanor. Seems like it's Herm's way or no way. Maybe that's the right way to do it, I mean you can't just let the inmates run the assylum. But I would think that their feedback would be valuable. Especially the high profile players.

Otter
01-09-2007, 10:48 AM
And what pray tell would he learn from an "exit interview" that he doesnt already know?

An exit interview could be an enlightning experience when done with someone cerebral and level headed. Once the "exit" is already established all reservations caused by employer-employee relationship are virtually out the door and people tend to speek freely.

In an ideal atmosphere people would speak their mind and offer constructive critisism before this point but the real world doesn't always work that way.

HonestChieffan
01-09-2007, 10:52 AM
Ive given exit interviews and I have had an exit interview. In total the experience was about that of having leftover tuna casserole.

Happy folk say all is good, stay the course.
Mad folk say you suck, management above you sucks and Im going to double my pay with the competition. Nothing comes from an emotion charged interview other than emotion.
Retiring folk say when do i get my final bonus check.

If getting feedback waits till the exit interview your business is doomed.

Iowanian
01-09-2007, 10:53 AM
I don't know that its reasonable to expect a coach to have a sitdown with every player on the squad and practice squad, as well as coaches, staff, and do evaluations.

What I think it probably more beneficial and reasonable, would be for him to pull a Sample set of the team, Aging Vet likely leaving, supah-stah, offensive, defense, special team player and rookie.....to see how they felt about the year, what would have helped them more, and their thoughts.

It doesn't mean the coach has to implement those ideas, but it might be a good way at evaluate ones self as a coach, and look for a way to improve what you're doing.

I ask for input all the time after an event, presentation, conference in which I'm planning or speaking. If I don't ask, noone is going to tell me if I said "uh" too many times, so I can correct it and make the next one better.

Iowanian
01-09-2007, 10:54 AM
I think Herm should bring in a hypnotist.....preseason, each week, and at the end of the season. Build confidence, maintain focus and confidence, and at the end of the season to purge the barf of the offensive game plan and performance.

HonestChieffan
01-09-2007, 10:56 AM
Maybe they could watch old movies have candy and ice cream and just have good old fashioned fun.

Otter
01-09-2007, 10:58 AM
Ive given exit interviews and I have had an exit interview. In total the experience was about that of having leftover tuna casserole.

Happy folk say all is good, stay the course.
Mad folk say you suck, management above you sucks and Im going to double my pay with the competition. Nothing comes from an emotion charged interview other than emotion.
Retiring folk say when do i get my final bonus check.

If getting feedback waits till the exit interview your business is doomed.

Agree 100% it's the wrong time to be looking for information on what's wrong but players also leave because they want to move closer to home, play for a different team or make more money who aren't retiring, mad or happy. Just moving on.

If I thought putting bunny tails on every team members uniform would help at this point I'd be all for that too.

Being embaressed for the last 13 years is getting really old.

TinyEvel
01-09-2007, 11:01 AM
Here's Herm's Exit interview:

HERM: Hi, How ya doin? Have a seat.

PLAYER: Good. Thanks.

HERM: Well, if you've seen any of my press conferences, I've noted that this is a time of evaluation, and some players fit into the scheme...

PLAYER: Right.

HERM: ...and you don't. Buh-bye.

PLAYER: But what about the predictable play calling?

HERM: Talk to the hand....

PLAYER: Or the "Play not to lose" conservatism?

HERM" (with fingers in ear) Na Na Na Na Na Na....

PLAYER: But...

HERM: Don't let the doorknob hit you where the good Lord split you...

PLAYER: :cuss:

HERM: Last time I checked, I'm the head coach.

Over-Head
01-09-2007, 11:01 AM
I only ever had 1 exit interview.
When I left a company to start my own.
It pretty much ended when I tore the phone line out of the wall, to actually get the bossís attention.
He said why did you do that?
I said well, Iíve been sitting here 25 mins of which you spent 20 on the phone ordering a new car, dinner reservations, and making a dentist appointment.
I figure you asked me in here to talk, so talk to me, not your damn phone.
Then I got up and left.
A week later he offered me an extra $5.00 an hour to come back.
Two weeks later he asked what it would cost him to have me back.
3 weeks later he called to tell me off for stealing 9 of his "long time coustermers"
all 3 times I put HIM on hold for 20 mins. :D

bogie
01-09-2007, 11:13 AM
Everone manages differently. In my opinion, he should have an exit interview. At the very least, he should offer an exit interview and allow the player to accept or decline. JMO, if he doesn't perform exit interviews he's either, too lazy, too disorganized or a pussy and doesn't want to confront an angry lineman.

StcChief
01-09-2007, 11:13 AM
The walk out is never as rewarding as the walk in

that's not true. Some know they have skills and can move on to bigger better teams or careers elsewhere.

others suck and will be no more than emergency calls if all else fails.

DaneMcCloud
01-09-2007, 11:20 AM
I think exit interviews are bogus, especially in a business as tight-knit as the NFL. Everybody knows everybody. I had exit interview with two major music/film/tv studios and lied my frickin' ass off in each one. Told them how great the company was, how I would really miss working there and gave them both incorrect reasons for leaving. Why? Because I didn't want to burn any bridges, in case I'd ever need to work for or with either of them again.

IMO, an honest exit interview can never be "good" for the employee.

HonestChieffan
01-09-2007, 11:24 AM
Word!

bogie
01-09-2007, 11:26 AM
Won't Herm do the firing face to face? Isn't that pretty much an exit interview?

King_Chief_Fan
01-09-2007, 11:33 AM
During Kawicka's interview where he said some players didn't take thing seriously, he was asked and said that Herm was not conducting exit interviews with the players.

I don't know the percentage of teams that do, or don't hold such meetings. I'm just wondering what people think about exit interviews and the 2006 Chiefs.

Do people think Herm should have had such meetings with the players? Could he have learned some things from them? Or, did Herm do the right thing; he knows enough from 17 games and it is going to be his way or the highway in any event.

Herm is an effin clown. He is stubborn and blind. He is too busy looking for scape goats. He won't find what he wants to find in his exit interviews so why have them. He isn't having them because he knows what he will hear.

dirk digler
01-09-2007, 11:54 AM
Kawika said he talks to Gun everyday so Gun knows what he thinks.

It is called the chain of command.

Chiefnj
01-09-2007, 11:57 AM
Kawika said he talks to Gun everyday so Gun knows what he thinks.

It is called the chain of command.

Great, so on offense Herm will rely solely upon what Solari tells him.

dirk digler
01-09-2007, 12:03 PM
Great, so on offense Herm will rely solely upon what Solari tells him.


Kawika did say he talks to Gun everyday and Gun knows how he feels but the last part was me being a sarcastic ass.

ck_IN
01-09-2007, 12:08 PM
In my experience on jobs I've found that exit interviews make very little difference. HR typically conducts them and the info you give gets so massaged and watered down that it's meaningless by the time it gets passed back. IF it gets passed back!

'Hamas' Jenkins
01-09-2007, 12:11 PM
Granted, I come from academia, but I schedule conferences at the beginning middle and end of each semester so that I can let them know what I think of their progress. This is especially beneficial if there are things that I think they can work on in the future (this could extend to the "offseason") I see no reason why a properly conducted interview couldn't be beneficial.

DaneMcCloud
01-09-2007, 12:28 PM
Granted, I come from academia, but I schedule conferences at the beginning middle and end of each semester so that I can let them know what I think of their progress. This is especially beneficial if there are things that I think they can work on in the future (this could extend to the "offseason") I see no reason why a properly conducted interview couldn't be beneficial.

Yes, very different. You're speaking with students who are PAYING you for your service. In this case, we're talking about paid athletes who are asked for their honest opinion of their teammates and coaches?

No way will anyone give an honest answer when it's their paycheck on the line.

GoHuge
01-09-2007, 12:32 PM
Here's Herm's Exit interview:

HERM: Hi, How ya doin? Have a seat.

PLAYER: Good. Thanks.

HERM: Well, if you've seen any of my press conferences, I've noted that this is a time of evaluation, and some players fit into the scheme...

PLAYER: Right.

HERM: ...and you don't. Buh-bye.

PLAYER: But what about the predictable play calling?

HERM: Talk to the hand....

PLAYER: Or the "Play not to lose" conservatism?

HERM" (with fingers in ear) Na Na Na Na Na Na....

PLAYER: But...

HERM: Don't let the doorknob hit you where the good Lord split you...

PLAYER: :cuss:

HERM: Last time I checked, I'm the head coach.
:)

'Hamas' Jenkins
01-09-2007, 12:47 PM
Yes, very different. You're speaking with students who are PAYING you for your service. In this case, we're talking about paid athletes who are asked for their honest opinion of their teammates and coaches?

No way will anyone give an honest answer when it's their paycheck on the line.

This is true, but at the same time, I think that 1 on 1's would help if Herm elucidated his philosophy to them personally and told them WHAT HE THOUGHT their strenghts and weaknesses are

Example:

"Jordan, I think you did an admirable job this year, but you really need to work on your footspeed and agility in the offseason. Here is the number of a speed trainer that I think you should work with so that you do a better job of covering the outside speed rush. I'd also like to see you look into ______ and _____ to improve your footwork."