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Jenny Gump
02-18-2007, 09:11 PM
In my new place I have practically zero water pressure in any faucet/shower when on hot. The closer you move it to cold, the stronger the pressure. So imagine on a scale of 1-10 with 10 being very strong wonderful water pressure...on hot, my faucets run about a 3. I can't even take a jacuzzi bath because the hot water just trickles in. Any ideas? I am seriously getting frustrated.

HMc
02-18-2007, 09:13 PM
could be leak in a pipe close to the hot water heater

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 09:13 PM
You only need to know three things to be a plumber. 1. Shit won't run uphill Payday is Friday 3. The boss is an SOB

luv
02-18-2007, 09:14 PM
Hot water heater clogged up, maybe? If it were me, I'd call a plumber first thing in the morning for a quote (well, that's what I'd do if I owned a house). Good luck!

Phobia
02-18-2007, 09:14 PM
How old is your house?

Jenny Gump
02-18-2007, 09:14 PM
could be leak in a pipe close to the hot water heater

That makes sense. Would I hear it somewhere? Please help this dumb girl figure this out. (yes I am playing the helpless card)

Bill Parcells
02-18-2007, 09:15 PM
Go see if the hot water heater is leaking..that's probably it.

Jenny Gump
02-18-2007, 09:15 PM
How old is your house? 10

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 09:16 PM
Seriously, it sounds like your hot water heater or the hot water pipes are clogged. Is the hot water weak at the other outlets? (Kitchen, bathroom sink)

Jenny Gump
02-18-2007, 09:17 PM
Seriously, it sounds like your hot water heater or the hot water pipes are clogged. Is the hot water weak at the other outlets? (Kitchen, bathroom sink) Its weak EVERYWHERE. So WTF do you do for a clogged hot water heater? Plumber I am guessing?

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 09:20 PM
Its weak EVERYWHERE. So WTF do you do for a clogged hot water heater? Plumber I am guessing?
That narrows it down to the water heater. There is a faucet (drain) on the front of the heater. Get a large pan and open that faucet and see if a bunch of scale comes out.

FDS
02-18-2007, 09:21 PM
So you get all nippley in the shower?

Thank you

PBJ FirstDownSamie PBJ

Jenny Gump
02-18-2007, 09:22 PM
So you get all nippley in the shower?

Thank you

PBJ FirstDownSamie PBJ

Well, I'm sure my nipples get harder than your dick.

Jenny Gump
02-18-2007, 09:22 PM
That narrows it down to the water heater. There is a faucet (drain) on the front of the heater. Get a large pan and open that faucet and see if a bunch of scale comes out.
Ok, the one that is piped down to below the house?

Phobia
02-18-2007, 09:22 PM
If your house is 10 years old and you haven't replaced the HW heater, it's probably time. You're looking at $500 minimum to buy a new hot water heater, install and haul away. That's for a cheap hot water heater. It goes up the more you spend on the heater.

FDS
02-18-2007, 09:23 PM
Well, I'm sure my nipples get harder than your dick.


If only you posted 30 seconds earlier.


PBJ FirstDownSamie PBJ

Chiefsrocker
02-18-2007, 09:34 PM
I've been a plumber for about 25 years and have seen this before. Usually on the hot water heater outlet, there is a fitting that connects it ot the piping system. That fitting sometimes gets a buildup in it and slowly reduces the water pressure coming out of the water heater. A way to check this is to find the pop-off on the top or the side of the heater. There will be a small handle on the pop-off. Pull up on the handle to let the water out. Be careful, it will be hot. You should have really good water pressure coming out of the pop-off. Replacing the fitting isnt to tough a job, depending on the style of piping to the heater and access to the top of the heater. Hope this helps!!

Phobia
02-18-2007, 09:41 PM
I'll certainly defer to Chiefsrocker's answers, but the life of a hot-water-heater is generally under 10 years, especially on a builder grade heater they install into houses. I'm sure your builder didn't put a high quality heater in there. Rather than investing money into a heater that is through anyway, I'd just go with a replacement (if in fact, it's the original heater).

Would you agree with that, Chiefsrocker?

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 09:55 PM
Jenny, that faucet should be on the front of your water heater. It has an outlet that a garden hose will screw onto. It should have a round handle you can open. Put a pan under it and open it. Don't listen to moneybags Phil and replace a working heater. It is more than likely just a blockage.

HMc
02-18-2007, 09:58 PM
what creates the pressure coming out of a hot water heater? the input pressure from the cold pipes?

DenverChief
02-18-2007, 10:00 PM
isn'tthere an on/off valve after the hot water heater that could be partially closed?

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 10:04 PM
what creates the pressure coming out of a hot water heater? the input pressure from the cold pipes?
Yes. That is why I'm trying to get her to open the drain. If it is not clogged then we look downstream of the heater.

Zebedee DuBois
02-18-2007, 10:09 PM
tell Nasium you need help getting your fluids going.

Phobia
02-18-2007, 10:11 PM
Moneybags - that's pretty funny.

How long is the life expentancy of a hot water heater, Skip?

Do you have a water treatment system, Jenny?

DenverChief
02-18-2007, 10:18 PM
isn't there an on/off valve after the hot water heater that could be partially closed?

Not that it could be anything easy like that ...I mean c'mon most problems are usually answered by the least complicated solution

HMc
02-18-2007, 10:19 PM
Seems to me that, based on what i think and what is written here, if the water is HOT, then the heater is still performing its sole job. The heat comes from the heater, the pressure is from the supply. So low pressure means there is either a water leak, a blockage, or perhaps a hole in the heater somewhere?

Iowanian
02-18-2007, 10:23 PM
I wouldn't take plumbing advice from someone from the southern hemisphere. Their turds don't even swirl in the proper direction.

DenverChief
02-18-2007, 10:23 PM
I wouldn't take plumbing advice from someone from the southern hemisphere. Their turds don't even swirl in the proper direction.
ROFL

HMc
02-18-2007, 10:30 PM
I wouldn't take plumbing advice from someone from the southern hemisphere. Their turds don't even swirl in the proper direction.

Stop! It hurts!

Iowanian
02-18-2007, 10:36 PM
Stop! It hurts!

I think I've heard you should give your boyfriend a "safe word" so he'll slow down, chauncy.

I can see why the conversation of stuffed pipe is confusing.

NCarlsCorner2
02-18-2007, 10:40 PM
If the water heater was install incorrectly by having copper piping going into galvanized piping the two metals will cause a corrosion to happen inside the pipes at the top of the water heater where the pipes go into the water heater, to keep this from happening again if you have a new water heater installed make sure they use dielectric unions.

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 10:43 PM
Moneybags - that's pretty funny.

How long is the life expentancy of a hot water heater, Skip?

Do you have a water treatment system, Jenny?
I've had them last fifteen years. All that kills them for good is leakage.

Bowser
02-18-2007, 10:44 PM
Is the pressure valve on the line coming into your house adjusted correctly? That's the only new idea I can think of.

I seriously doubt your lines can be corroded shut if the house is only 10 years old.

Phobia
02-18-2007, 10:45 PM
If the water heater was install incorrectly by having copper piping going into galvanized piping the two metals will cause a corrosion to happen inside the pipes at the top of the water heater where the pipes go into the water heater, to keep this from happening again if you have a new water heater installed make sure they use dielectric unions.

Her house is only 10 years old. They won't have galvanized pipes.

NCarlsCorner2
02-18-2007, 10:48 PM
Her house is only 10 years old. They won't have galvanized pipes.

But whoever put the water heater in might have used galvanized nipples going into the top of the water heater, I see it all the time.

Phobia
02-18-2007, 10:49 PM
Jenny, if you do replace your hot water heater, check into a tankless heater. You only heat the water that you actually use instead of heating 40 gallons + 24/7/365. A hot water heater is actually a very ineffecient, antiquated method of heating water.

If I needed to replace my hot water heater tomorrow, I'd almost certainly put in a tankless heater.

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 10:49 PM
Is the pressure valve on the line coming into your house adjusted correctly? That's the only new idea I can think of.

I seriously doubt your lines can be corroded shut if the house is only 10 years old.
And that would shut down only the hot water?

Phobia
02-18-2007, 10:49 PM
But whoever put the water heater in might have used galvanized nipples going into the top of the water heater, I see it all the time.

Oh yeah - true.

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 10:50 PM
Well, Jenny, did you find the drain valve?

NCarlsCorner2
02-18-2007, 10:51 PM
Oh yeah - true.
You should use dielectric unions or go from copper to brass.

A water softner system can also cause the same problem.

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 11:07 PM
Jenny seems to have lost interest so I have too.

Phobia
02-18-2007, 11:10 PM
I'm sending her a bill for this.

DenverChief
02-18-2007, 11:12 PM
Kinda funny

Shut Off & Temperature/Pressure Valves

If you install a new heater on your own, DO NOT install a shut off valve on the hot water outlet water line. Only install a valve on the cold water side. If a valve is on both lines and some idiot turns them off while the heater is on, AND the T/P valve fails......BOOM! It has happened before, I have seen a heater go from a basement through two floors and a roof and end up 150 feet away. NEVER re-use a T/P valve. Always buy a new one.

http://www.askthebuilder.com/B205_Hot_Water_Heater_Tips.shtml

then

Whole-house hot-water shutoff. On your water heater there should be a valve on the hot-water outlet, which controls all of the hot water to the house. If there isn't one on yours, you or your plumber should install one.

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/plumbing/article/0,16417,193969,00.html

boogblaster
02-18-2007, 11:19 PM
If you have 2 kinds of piping copper to anything else its called electrilious the pipes acually grow together..but it could just be at the fitting off the heater clogging or your pressure could be shut down somewhere after your meter ...

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 11:19 PM
I'm sending her a bill for this.
She'll just laugh. Nobody pays you.

DenverChief
02-18-2007, 11:21 PM
I guess I only thought it was ironic/funny

Skip Towne
02-18-2007, 11:24 PM
I guess I only thought it was ironic/funny
Just different opinions. I seriously doubt that water heater rocket story. But I wouldn't put a shutoff valve downstream. Why would you?

Phobia
02-18-2007, 11:24 PM
She'll just laugh. Nobody pays you.

That's true.

DenverChief
02-18-2007, 11:33 PM
Just different opinions. I seriously doubt that water heater rocket story. But I wouldn't put a shutoff valve downstream. Why would you?

:shrug: I'm sure there is a good reason I just don't know any

Halfcan
02-18-2007, 11:37 PM
Wow the personal insults on here are hotter than Jennys water.

PastorMikH
02-19-2007, 12:00 AM
Leave it to a woman to start a new thread instead of putting this in the handyman thread.


:shake: :shake:


:) :) :)



I was thinking the hot water heater tank or water fittings around it were scaled up but it sounds like this has already been the consensus.

Fairplay
02-19-2007, 12:53 AM
If your house is 10 years old and you haven't replaced the HW heater, it's probably time. You're looking at $500 minimum to buy a new hot water heater, install and haul away. That's for a cheap hot water heater. It goes up the more you spend on the heater.



1100 bucks for me.

Phobia
02-19-2007, 01:15 AM
You probably got a larger heater rated for 12 years. At least I hope you did.

Fairplay
02-19-2007, 01:20 AM
Itas a Bradford White 40 gallon water heater.

The plumber says its the only brand he installs. It better be good.

plbrdude
02-19-2007, 07:45 AM
Itas a Bradford White 40 gallon water heater.

The plumber says its the only brand he installs. It better be good.


prolly $285 wholesale. i sell a.o. smith and prices do vary somewhat. last wtr htr chgout i did was $652. prolly why i'm poor. but if i hit some one $1100 for a htr chgout i'd prolly not get called as often.



on the subject though, 1st i'd ck and make sure the shut off was turned on. then t&p, forget the drain valve for now. them move on down the system from there, starting on top of the heater.

Saulbadguy
02-19-2007, 07:56 AM
You only need to know three things to be a plumber. 1. Shit won't run uphill Payday is Friday 3. The boss is an SOB
The 3rd one is "don't chew on your fingernails"

Skip Towne
02-19-2007, 07:59 AM
The 3rd one is "don't chew on your fingernails"
Hot's on the left, cold's on the right.

Simply Red
02-19-2007, 08:02 AM
Hot's on the left, cold's on the right.
LMAO

Baby Lee
02-19-2007, 09:35 AM
Hot's on the left, cold's on the right.
Righty-tighty, lefty-loosey.

Simply Red
02-19-2007, 09:44 AM
"it's all pink on the inside"


Wait...

Phobia
02-19-2007, 09:50 AM
Seriously though, am I the only strange one here?

Would you spend $250 fixing your 10 year old big screen?

Would you spend $20 having a new zipper sewed into your Levis?

Would you invest $2000 into a new engine for your Chevy Lumina with 175,000 miles on it?

No, you wouldn't. If you're gonna need a new one anyway in the very near future anyway, why don't you just bite the bullet and put your hard earned money into new rather than repairing something that has very little life left?

I don't understand the answers on this thread.

kepp
02-19-2007, 10:05 AM
Seriously though, am I the only strange one here?

Would you spend $250 fixing your 10 year old big screen?

Would you spend $20 having a new zipper sewed into your Levis?

Would you invest $2000 into a new engine for your Chevy Lumina with 175,000 miles on it?

No, you wouldn't. If you're gonna need a new one anyway in the very near future anyway, why don't you just bite the bullet and put your hard earned money into new rather than repairing something that has very little life left?

I don't understand the answers on this thread.
If its something simple (read "cheap") I'd fix it but, for the most part, I agree with you.

I've also been looking at getting a tankless water heater like you mentioned. I know they save $$ on utilities and I hate when we "run out" of hot water. Do they last longer then the traditional heaters?

Phobia
02-19-2007, 10:12 AM
If its something simple (read "cheap") I'd fix it but, for the most part, I agree with you.
Plumbers get $75 just to show up at your front door. I'd rather eat $1000 today than spend $150 on a repair and then have to spend the $1000 in August anyway.

*disclaimers: If her hot water heater in her house has been replaced since being built or if she has a water treatment system, she should check into having it repaired. A water treatment system that removes sediment can extend the life of a hot water heater significantly.

Hog Farmer
02-19-2007, 10:15 AM
I just want to see if Jenny has them there galvanized nipples!

Brock
02-19-2007, 10:15 AM
If its something simple (read "cheap") I'd fix it but, for the most part, I agree with you.

I've also been looking at getting a tankless water heater like you mentioned. I know they save $$ on utilities and I hate when we "run out" of hot water. Do they last longer then the traditional heaters?

I don't think they've been around long enough to judge their longevity, but as simple as they are, I bet a tankless would outlast a regular water heater by a long stretch, simply because there's no tank to corrode.

Simply Red
02-19-2007, 10:32 AM
I don't think they've been around long enough to judge their longevity, but as simple as they are, I bet a tankless would outlast a regular water heater by a long stretch, simply because there's no tank to corrode.

Sounds like a good answer to me..

Phobia
02-19-2007, 10:38 AM
I don't know enough about tankless to comment on their longevity. Common sense would indicate that it would, but I really have no personal experience with it. A cursory search indicates the tankless water heaters are warranted for 7-10 years which leads me to believe their expected life cycle is similar to tank systems.

If you have the kind of jack to throw at a tankless water heater, you probably can afford a decent whole house water filtration sysem which will extend the life, your pipes, faucets, and water heater.

cdcox
02-19-2007, 11:04 AM
Putting in a water heater is a pretty easy job. The hardest part is draining the water from the old one if it contains a lot of sediment in the bottom. You can buy a good heater for $300 - 350 and save all the labor. I think it would be interesting to see Phil, Skip and whoever else wants to chip in walk Jenny through the process of intalling a new heater herself.

Phobia
02-19-2007, 11:09 AM
Putting in a water heater is a pretty easy job. The hardest part is draining the water from the old one if it contains a lot of sediment in the bottom. You can buy a good heater for $300 - 350 and save all the labor. I think it would be interesting to see Phil, Skip and whoever else wants to chip in walk Jenny through the process of intalling a new heater herself.

Uh - I wouldn't want to walk anybody through that process. On paper, it's an easy job. It should take no more than 20 minutes once the tank is drained. But I've only had that happen for me a couple times. I always run into issues installing hot water heaters.

Besides, Jenny has plenty of money. She can contribute to the local economy.

cdcox
02-19-2007, 11:26 AM
I always run into issues installing hot water heaters.



That was what was going to make it interesting.

Since the problem is low pressure, the actual problem is probably a blockage between the heater and the faucet, most likely at the exit of the heater, as others have mentioned. However, the blockage is probably a deposit of minerals from the water, and those minerals are also depositing in the heater. Once enough of them accumulate, it will have to be replaced. So I agree with Phil, as long as you have the plumber there, you might as well replace the heater, as it is probably late in the second half of its life.

HonestChieffan
02-19-2007, 11:54 AM
I just had a new 40 Gal AOSmith electric WH put in...install new haul off old was 298 bucks.

Glad I dont live in city paying city prices.

Phobia
02-19-2007, 11:57 AM
That's an amazing price. Congrats.

plbrdude
02-19-2007, 01:22 PM
I just had a new 40 Gal AOSmith electric WH put in...install new haul off old was 298 bucks.

Glad I dont live in city paying city prices.


a.o smith ecs40 wholesales here at 266.3. how any one could do it at that price is beyond me.

Skip Towne
02-19-2007, 01:38 PM
Seriously though, am I the only strange one here?

Would you spend $250 fixing your 10 year old big screen?

Would you spend $20 having a new zipper sewed into your Levis?

Would you invest $2000 into a new engine for your Chevy Lumina with 175,000 miles on it?

No, you wouldn't. If you're gonna need a new one anyway in the very near future anyway, why don't you just bite the bullet and put your hard earned money into new rather than repairing something that has very little life left?

I don't understand the answers on this thread.
Would you trade cars because your present one needs an oil change? She has a blockage most likely. Not a bad water heater.

Dartgod
02-19-2007, 01:41 PM
She has a blockage most likely. Not a bad water heater.
At his age, Skip knows all about blockages...

http://www.ibstales.com/images/products/metamucil.jpg

Simply Red
02-19-2007, 01:41 PM
a.o smith ecs40 wholesales here at 266.3. how any one could do it at that price is beyond me.


:hmmm: Okay what now?

Skip Towne
02-19-2007, 01:46 PM
Something I learned one time while installing a water heater. Don't leave the old one out on the curb for a few days. The city inspector might see it and make you get a permit to install a new one. He went away when I told him I did it myself.

keg in kc
02-19-2007, 01:47 PM
77 posts and nobody has offered to personally inspect Jenny's 'plumbing'?

What the f*ck has happened to this place?

cdcox
02-19-2007, 02:15 PM
77 posts and nobody has offered to personally inspect Jenny's 'plumbing'?

What the f*ck has happened to this place?

We fear teh Nasium.

ChiefButthurt
02-19-2007, 02:19 PM
You only need to know three things to be a plumber. 1. Shit won't run uphill Payday is Friday 3. The boss is an SOB

You forgot one Skip.

4. Don't bite your fingernails.

Jenny Gump
02-19-2007, 03:02 PM
I'm going to play with the plumbing tonight. I was way too tired to start messing with it last night.

Thanks for all the suggestions. I fear a leak or blockage.

Boise_Chief
02-19-2007, 03:33 PM
The very first thing you should check is that your cold water supply valve on top of your tank is on. the handle should point the same direction that your pipe does. If it somehow got shut off it would do the same thing to your pressure.

Boise_Chief
02-19-2007, 03:35 PM
Also, if you have very hard water it can plug the aerator screens in your faucets, but wouldn't normally effect your tub faucet.

ChiefsFire
02-19-2007, 03:42 PM
Jenny,Jenny,Jenny....dont listen to these guys...

The only way i can tell for sure what the problem is is for me to come over and shower with you...Is tonight good for you?

Phobia
02-19-2007, 08:19 PM
Would you trade cars because your present one needs an oil change? She has a blockage most likely. Not a bad water heater.

If an oil change was going to cost me 15-25% of the car's worth, yes I would.

If my car were on year 10 of a 10 year expected life? Yes.

Coach
02-19-2007, 08:21 PM
Sounds like you'll probably need a new Shower Cartridge and/or a new Tub Diverter.

NewChief
02-19-2007, 08:37 PM
I haven't read the thread, but I'll relate my experience. We had low water pressure for the hot water in our kitchen. I looked at the pipes, and they were crappy galvanized metal that was starting to rust. I figured out that the problem was that they were rusting on the inside. The rust flakes had basically stopped up the lines. I replaced all the pipes, and I still had crappy pressure. We wanted a new faucet anyway, so I replaced that next. Problem solved. The rust had gotten into the faucet as well.

TinyEvel
02-19-2007, 08:52 PM
I'm going to play with the plumbing tonight.


OMFG! This thread is wrought with innuendos!

Seriously, check that drain valve near the bottom of the heater. The one that a garden hose can hook up to.

10 years old a water heater gets sediment built up in it, blocking the flow. Eventually, they just burst. THis is probably the case if by your pressure scale of 3 for hot water and cold is closer to 10.

Also: If this si a hoem you recently bought (within the past 12 months) a lot of seller's throw in a homeowner's warranty. This would cover appliances, including a water heater. Deal is, you have to call the homeowner's Warranty company, they send out a local plumber on their list. There's a deductible, usually 50 or a hundred bucks.

Just suggesting you check into it, if that's the case.

Skip Towne
02-19-2007, 10:59 PM
If an oil change was going to cost me 15-25% of the car's worth, yes I would.

If my car were on year 10 of a 10 year expected life? Yes.
What if you could find and fix the blockage yourself? You have been saying replace it from the get go. Without even trying to fix the real problem. This is why I don't trust contractors. You do realize Jenny could replace the water heater and still have the problem don't you? I would rather find the problem and fix it than just blindly replacing the heater.

Extra Point
02-19-2007, 11:12 PM
What if you could find and fix the blockage yourself? You have been saying replace it from the get go. Without even trying to fix the real problem. This is why I don't trust contractors. You do realize Jenny could replace the water heater and still have the problem don't you? I would rather find the problem and fix it than just blindly replacing the heater.

Besides the fact that you sifting throught the miasma of your house burning down, what's keeping you from heading to Witchitaland to help our Miss Gump?

Skip Towne
02-19-2007, 11:16 PM
Besides the fact that you sifting throught the miasma of your house burning down, what's keeping you from heading to Witchitaland to help our Miss Gump?
Duh. Mainly that Miss Gump doesn't live in Wichitaland, n00b.

Extra Point
02-19-2007, 11:19 PM
I thought she lived in Wichita. Sorry, my bad.

How's your hammer hanging?

Skip Towne
02-19-2007, 11:21 PM
I thought she lived in Wichita. Sorry, my bad.

How's your hammer hanging?
Doing well, all things considered, thank you.

Phobia
02-19-2007, 11:25 PM
What if you could find and fix the blockage yourself? You have been saying replace it from the get go. Without even trying to fix the real problem. This is why I don't trust contractors. You do realize Jenny could replace the water heater and still have the problem don't you? I would rather find the problem and fix it than just blindly replacing the heater.

I've given sound advice. I have no problem with people who try to squeeze every single moment of life out of their products but she's gonna be replacing that heater very soon anyway. If she's going to pay the $75 for a plumber to pull into her driveway, I'd just apply that money towards the hot water heater installation charge.

I've never replaced a hot water heater that didn't need changing. I don't take people's money for no reason so don't lump me in with those guys.

I'm no plumbing guru, but my money is on the hot water heater.

Skip Towne
02-19-2007, 11:53 PM
I've given sound advice. I have no problem with people who try to squeeze every single moment of life out of their products but she's gonna be replacing that heater very soon anyway. If she's going to pay the $75 for a plumber to pull into her driveway, I'd just apply that money towards the hot water heater installation charge.

I've never replaced a hot water heater that didn't need changing. I don't take people's money for no reason so don't lump me in with those guys.

I'm no plumbing guru, but my money is on the hot water heater.
So you would make no attempt to find and fix the problem? Rather, you would throw money at it (the customers money). Man, if I did that in my business I wouldn't be in business. Jenny could still have the problem after your money fix since you didn't find the problem (or make any attempt to). What do you do if that happens? Sorry, I must find the problem and then explain the options to the customer.

Phobia
02-20-2007, 12:03 AM
Of course I would. I'm bracing her for what I feel is the most likely problem troubleshooting with limited information via text on the internet.

If she can squeeze more life out of her heater, that's great. Based on what I've heard, that's the problem. But if I were actually on-site I'd look for other possible issues before asking the homeower to put out that money.

The difference here is she's not my client. She's my friend. I'm giving her my opinion for free. My opinion is based on my personal experiences.

Skip Towne
02-20-2007, 12:07 AM
I've never replaced a hot water heater that didn't need changing.
How could you possibly know that? While you are advising Jenny to buy a new heater on the "expected life"? The only reasons to replace a water heater are the tank leaks or the gas valve is shot. I don't think you are a shyster. I just think you are wrong. I think you should identify the problem and offer the customer the chance to decide to fix it or spend $1100 on a new unit they may not need for 5 years. Not all of us have your money.

Phobia
02-20-2007, 12:16 AM
Dude, go back and read my posts. Everything I said included "probably" and "likely" disclaimers. I'm certainly open to other possibilities.

I think it's the hot water heater but without the benefit of being there I can't make a concise assessment. When you ask for an internet diagnosis you get what you pay for.

jspchief
02-20-2007, 08:10 AM
Hmm. I'm surprised at the suggestion that the hot water heater would be on it's last leg after only 10 years.

Mine was installed in 1986 and works great. It may not be the most efficient thing on the market, but I certainly would have never expected to hear that they only last 10 years.

Brock
02-20-2007, 08:11 AM
Hmm. I'm surprised at the suggestion that the hot water heater would be on it's last leg after only 10 years.

Mine was installed in 1986 and works great. It may not be the most efficient thing on the market, but I certainly would have never expected to hear that they only last 10 years.

Just curious, do you have a water softener?

Saulbadguy
02-20-2007, 08:14 AM
I actually have the same problem. The hotter I go, the less water pressure I get. I thought about flushing it but i'd probably **** it up somehow.

jspchief
02-20-2007, 08:21 AM
Just curious, do you have a water softener?Nope.

cdcox
02-20-2007, 09:01 AM
How long a water heater lasts depends a lot on your local water quality. If you have a lot of hardness and alkalinity in your water, you are more likely to deposit mangnium hydroxide and calcium carbonate. You can make your heater last longer if you drain the sediment out every few months. I'm too lazy for that. If your water is corrosive (a different condition) you are likely to rust it out faster.

I had problems with my electric water heater a few years back. I replaced one of the heating elements (not easy to unscrew the old one due to corrosion and scaling) and tried to flush some of the sediment out. The sediment would not drain through the bottom drain very well, because the valve port was only about 1/8 of an inch in diameter, and I had very little elevation distance between the bottom of the hot water heater and the floor drain. To make matters worse, the floor drain was backing up so I had to shop vac all the water up and dump it. That was probably a 10 hour job all told and most of the sediment was still in the heater.

Six months later, the heater was in the exact same condition as before. The other element had burnt out and it was still very difficult to drain due to the accumulated sediment. Needless to say, I decided to cut my losses and just install a new one. That was $250 well spent.

Baby Lee
02-20-2007, 10:01 AM
hot water heater.
Pet peeve alert.
A water heater heats cold water.
I guess it could heat hot water, but usually the city doesn't distribute hot water, and besides hot water doesn't need heating.

Phobia
02-20-2007, 10:04 AM
Hmm. I'm surprised at the suggestion that the hot water heater would be on it's last leg after only 10 years.

Mine was installed in 1986 and works great. It may not be the most efficient thing on the market, but I certainly would have never expected to hear that they only last 10 years.

That's amazing. Do you flush it annually? Maybe the previous homeowner did.

Phobia
02-20-2007, 10:05 AM
Pet peeve alert.
A water heater heats cold water.
I guess it could heat hot water, but usually the city doesn't distribute hot water, and besides hot water doesn't need heating.

Heh. I'm not sure why I say that.

jspchief
02-20-2007, 10:11 AM
That's amazing. Do you flush it annually? Maybe the previous homeowner did.I don't do shit to it other than occasionally kick it while wondering why the hell it has to be dead center of my laundry room. I've been here 10 years.

I recognize that 20 years is old and would probably replace before repair, but I probably wouldn't have considered that option on one that was only 10 years old.

Phobia
02-20-2007, 10:18 AM
Builders put cheap crap into spec homes. I've replaced plenty of heaters in ten years old homes. Maybe you got a better quality unit. Maybe the previous homeowner took really good care of it (most homeowners do not flush it as recommended). Maybe your municipality has really good water.

Mile High Mania
02-20-2007, 10:30 AM
I don't know if this has been mentioned, but... get one of these and rid yourself of the clunky water heater.

http://www.noritz.com/

Jenny Gump
02-21-2007, 07:19 PM
I realize I am a total "girl" about this, but I don't see what you mean by drain valve. This pisses me off because I really want to do this myself. Would it look like an outdoor faucet handle, like what you hook your garden hose to? If so, I don't have one. There are however, a bunch of straight things that are red on the tip. I know...I'm and idiot.

OMFG! This thread is wrought with innuendos!

Seriously, check that drain valve near the bottom of the heater. The one that a garden hose can hook up to.

10 years old a water heater gets sediment built up in it, blocking the flow. Eventually, they just burst. THis is probably the case if by your pressure scale of 3 for hot water and cold is closer to 10.

Also: If this si a hoem you recently bought (within the past 12 months) a lot of seller's throw in a homeowner's warranty. This would cover appliances, including a water heater. Deal is, you have to call the homeowner's Warranty company, they send out a local plumber on their list. There's a deductible, usually 50 or a hundred bucks.

Just suggesting you check into it, if that's the case.

plbrdude
02-21-2007, 09:37 PM
How long a water heater lasts depends a lot on your local water quality. If you have a lot of hardness and alkalinity in your water, you are more likely to deposit mangnium hydroxide and calcium carbonate. You can make your heater last longer if you drain the sediment out every few months. I'm too lazy for that. If your water is corrosive (a different condition) you are likely to rust it out faster.

I had problems with my electric water heater a few years back. I replaced one of the heating elements (not easy to unscrew the old one due to corrosion and scaling) and tried to flush some of the sediment out. The sediment would not drain through the bottom drain very well, because the valve port was only about 1/8 of an inch in diameter, and I had very little elevation distance between the bottom of the hot water heater and the floor drain. To make matters worse, the floor drain was backing up so I had to shop vac all the water up and dump it. That was probably a 10 hour job all told and most of the sediment was still in the heater.

Six months later, the heater was in the exact same condition as before. The other element had burnt out and it was still very difficult to drain due to the accumulated sediment. Needless to say, I decided to cut my losses and just install a new one. That was $250 well spent.



excellent example of why sometimes you say forget it, get a new one. all cases aren't like yours, but where i live lime is a definate problem. and if you don't get the majority of the sediment out when you replace an element, you'll likely be back into it within 3 months. here's a tip for all you diy'ers. if you change your own element sometime in the future, (talking about the bottom element here)lay your hands on a piece of 1/2" od copper about 2' long. hammer about 3/4" flat on the end, then bend it over on a 90. then you can reach through the element hole and rake out a sizable sum of the sediment.after that, clean up the threads and stick in your element. just remember to fill heater before shooting the power to it. or you'll be in the market for 2 new elements.

Skip Towne
02-21-2007, 10:16 PM
What little I know about heaters I learned while owning three car washes. In one of them it only had a 40 gallon heater for one hand washing bay. But it had a tall roof and the exhaust pipe was about 8' long. I wrapped 3/8 inch copper tubing around that 3" exhaust pipe and used it for the incoming cold water feed. The incoming water was quite warm and I usually got two car washes before the heater kicked on.

NCarlsCorner2
02-21-2007, 10:25 PM
Is the problem fixed yet or what.

kepp
03-21-2007, 12:54 PM
I'm resurrecting this thread due to hot water heater difficulties.

Our hot water started coming out cloudy and yellowish and smelled kind of like dirt. So I put on my handyman's cap and drained it. The water was fine for about two weeks but now it's back to being yellowish and smelly. Should I just keep draining it? Since it went bad so quickly after the first draining should I assume it's shot and get a new one?

Also, if anyone has experience with water filtration/treatment systems, I'm trying to decide between a whole-house water filter (filters the water first thing when it enters your home) or a water softener. Which is better?

Redrum_69
03-21-2007, 01:07 PM
Replace water with antifreeze


problems solved

kepp
03-21-2007, 01:27 PM
Replace water with antifreeze


problems solved
I'll get right on that...
http://hornyoyster.com/wp-content/uploads/borat_trailer250c.jpg ......NOT!!

Phobia
03-21-2007, 01:27 PM
How old is the unit?

Halfcan
03-21-2007, 01:32 PM
There are however, a bunch of straight things that are red on the tip. I know...I'm and idiot.

You are still talking about plumbing right?

kepp
03-21-2007, 01:43 PM
How old is the unit?
Unless it was replaced before we bought the house, I'd say its about 7 years old. The draining that I did was most likely the first time it had seen any maintenance.

Redrum_69
03-21-2007, 01:45 PM
If Jenny Gump has plumbing problems...she has one option:

Go see a gynocologist



If the problem persists...contact me to come over for a good plungering

Redrum_69
03-21-2007, 01:46 PM
How old is the unit?


Thats what she said