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View Full Version : NFT Does anyone know the process of becoming a church member in early New England??


crispystl420
03-07-2007, 01:27 PM
I gotta answer this question but there isn't much info on it. Thanks in advance.

the Talking Can
03-07-2007, 01:29 PM
smear chicken blood on your face and kill your first born

Redrum_69
03-07-2007, 01:35 PM
Tell everyone in the village you seen your next door neighbor performing witchcraft ceremonies

Redrum_69
03-07-2007, 01:36 PM
To join the Roman Catholic church back then you had to wear a big letter "A" around your neck


or impale your enemies and leave them on the spikes on the road to your house....

crispystl420
03-07-2007, 01:43 PM
Tell everyone in the village you seen your next door neighbor performing witchcraft ceremonies
No Sh*t

Amnorix
03-07-2007, 01:45 PM
your question is vague, but I'd start by employing the word "puritan" in my research efforts. Not sure what this school project is really driving at.

Amnorix
03-07-2007, 01:46 PM
No Sh*t

don't get pissy. We're not here to help with high school projects. When you post stuff like this, expect flip answers, laugh, and then throw yourself on our mercy. That will get you much farther.

the Talking Can
03-07-2007, 01:52 PM
No Sh*t

oh yeah, being gay helped....like 90-95% of the Church was gay then....

Ultra Peanut
03-07-2007, 01:59 PM
You guys are assholes.

To join a typical New England church in early Colonial times, one of the most common options was to go to the Room of the Three Gargoyles. By pulling on the right tongue, the door to the staircase would open, leading to the wall climb. From that point, the entrant would need to make it to the Observatory, wherein they would spin the sundial to reach the chamber of the Golden Idols. There, they would place the vases in the slots to open the doors, taking them to the Shrine of the Silver Monkey!

Saulbadguy
03-07-2007, 02:02 PM
You guys are assholes.

To join a typical New England church in early Colonial times, one of the most common options was to go to the Room of the Three Gargoyles. By pulling on the right tongue, the door to the staircase would open, leading to the wall climb. From that point, the entrant would need to make it to the Observatory, wherein they would spin the sundial to reach the chamber of the Golden Idols. There, they would place the vases in the slots to open the doors, taking them to the Shrine of the Silver Monkey!
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a1/Legends_of_the_Hidden_Temple_%28Fogg_and_Olmec%29.jpg/225px-Legends_of_the_Hidden_Temple_%28Fogg_and_Olmec%29.jpg

Redrum_69
03-07-2007, 02:10 PM
I gotta answer this question but there isn't much info on it. Thanks in advance.


Well...you found this site....why not fugging google this instead of clogging the board's arteries with your mindless stupidity

chagrin
03-07-2007, 02:19 PM
you had to sit in a ceremonial room, and cut off each hand, foot, then your pennis, coin purse and finally your tongue; of course by that time you've bled to death, but you were saved, YAHOO!!

SPchief
03-07-2007, 02:19 PM
You guys are assholes.

To join a typical New England church in early Colonial times, one of the most common options was to go to the Room of the Three Gargoyles. By pulling on the right tongue, the door to the staircase would open, leading to the wall climb. From that point, the entrant would need to make it to the Observatory, wherein they would spin the sundial to reach the chamber of the Golden Idols. There, they would place the vases in the slots to open the doors, taking them to the Shrine of the Silver Monkey!


LMAO

crispystl420
03-07-2007, 02:20 PM
don't get pissy. We're not here to help with high school projects. When you post stuff like this, expect flip answers, laugh, and then throw yourself on our mercy. That will get you much farther.

I wasn't getting pissy. I was serious. Puritans were crazy in my opinion.
Thanks for your help man.

crispystl420
03-07-2007, 02:21 PM
Well...you found this site....why not fugging google this instead of clogging the board's arteries with your mindless stupidity
Damn couldn't you have just came up with a joke about my mom that was harsh.

Rooster
03-07-2007, 02:28 PM
I always thought the process was a lot like Fear Factor.

Jilly
03-07-2007, 02:36 PM
which church? And what do you mean early New England - 1500's, 1700's? I can answer this question for you, but I just need some greater details...

Redrum_69
03-07-2007, 03:02 PM
I got this information off the Warpaint Illustrated Site......



The religious issues which motivated many English people to emigrate to New England did not cease to exist once those people reached the new world. Religion played a major role in the daily life of the colonists and continued to be a motivating factor in the settlement of new towns and colonies in New England. Whether or not religion was the reason for Thomas and Anne Brownell's emigration to America, it was a factor that was to have a great influence on their lives and the lives of their family.

Although the Brownells came to America near the end of the "Great Migration" of the 1630's, their lives became entwined with those of the colonists who settled at Plymouth and those who founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony at Boston. To better understand how religion helped shape the Brownell Family, we must look at both these groups and the new societies that they established in New England.

Almost every American knows about the Pilgrims, the Mayflower and the founding of Plymouth in 1620, but their story actually begins much earlier. In the late 1500's and early 1600's, all those who were dissatisfied with the Established or Anglican Church of England were known as Puritans. But under this label was grouped a wide variety of sects and beliefs.

The majority of Puritans remained members of the established church and worked from within for a "second reformation" which would cleanse or purify the church by ridding it of its Catholic influences. Other Puritans broke away from the Church of England and formed churches of their own, a criminal act which made them the victims of arrests, fines, imprisonment and sometimes even death.

One such "separatist" church was in the area near Scrooby, in Nottinghamshire. (Scrooby is near to the area in Yorkshire where the Brownells lived.) Its leader was William Brewster, a Cambridge-educated, well-to-do man who had served as a diplomat during the reign of Elizabeth I. It was at Brewster's manor house that the Scrooby congregation gathered to worship in the early years of the seventeenth century. Most of the other members of this congregation were yeoman farmers and country artisans.

The separatists, being the most openly radical of the various Puritan groups, were the primary targets of persecution by the church and the state. It was this persecution that led the members of the Scrooby congregation to the decision to leave England, an act which itself was criminal. In 1607 and 1608 the majority (about one hundred men, women and children) of the Scrooby separatists secretly left England for Holland, where greater religious freedom existed. They settled in Amsterdam, but soon found themselves involved in religious conflicts with other English emigres and unable to adjust from the rural life they had known in England to the worldly and commercial life in that city.

In 1609 the congregation decided to move again, this time to Leyden, Holland, where they lived for over a decade. Leyden was much smaller than Amsterdam and its textile factories offered opportunities for employment. But life there was less than satisfactory for them. The language difference was a problem and most, being unskilled, found it difficult to compete in the job market. Having lost most of their possessions and what money they had when they left England, they now found themselves living in poverty which grew worse as the years went by.

The most distressing aspect of life in Holland was the fear of their children being assimilated into the Dutch culture. They would grow up speaking Dutch, with little or no memory of England and would probably marry Dutch citizens. This threat to their English heritage worried the congregation's leaders, as did the free and easy Dutch way of life. They disapproved of the lax Dutch observance of Sunday and saw the children "drawn away by evil examples into extravagant and dangerous courses, getting the reins off their necks and departing from their parents."

Poverty and the fear of the corruption of their youth were the chief motives for the restlessness of the separatists, but another factor also began to worry them. There was a growing fear that Spain would once again attack Holland and, if victorious, would reimpose the inquisition under which they had persecuted non-Catholics in Holland during the 1570's. The separatists expected to be among the first targets of such a persecution.

It was decided that the congregation would move once again, this time to an area "devoyd of all civill inhabitants," where they could keep their names, their faith and their nationality. With reports of progress in Virginia and the glowing accounts of the opportunities of the new world by men such as John Smith, the Scrooby separatists began to favor starting from scratch in the uncivilized world of America.

On 6 September 1620 the Mayflower set sail for America with 102 passengers. Of those, only about 40 were from the separatist community in Holland. Aside from a dozen servants and hired men, the rest were non-separatists recruited by the merchant company which financed the voyage. The differences between the two groups quickly became apparent as shown by the names given each. The separatists were called "saints" while the others were "strangers." The saints imposed a minority rule and created a good deal of outrage and dissension by insisting that their religious practices be followed by the whole company. They particularly annoyed the crew by being sanctimonious. At the same time, the strangers antagonized the saints with their intolerance of the separatists' beliefs.

After a long*sixty-six day*voyage which was extremely unpleasant because of the overcrowding of the ship, the shortage of supplies and the many heavy storms encountered, the Mayflower sighted land on 9 November 1620. They were about 300 miles north of their original destination*the Hudson River*near what is now Provincetown on Cape Cod. It was here that they first went ashore and quickly realized that the area was not suited for settlement. After further exploration, the company decided upon a more suitable spot with a fine harbor that had once been the site of an Indian village. They named their settlement Plymouth after the English city from which they had sailed.

Although the weather that year was quite mild, the Pilgrims were ill-prepared to survive the rigors of a New England winter. Nearly all were seriously weakened from the lack of adequate food, some had the beginnings of scurvy, and many were beginning to suffer from bronchial and related complaints. With the promise of continuing hunger, inadequate shelter and unremitting labor, they could not have been in a worse state. Before spring arrived, half of the company had died.

Because the Mayflower landed outside the jurisdiction of the Virginia Company, some of the strangers questioned the authority of the company's leaders. They felt that this freed them from all authority, that they could now proceed to do exactly as they chose in the new land. To prevent this kind of self-serving independent action and subject these wayward tendencies to their own strict sense of what a community ought to be, the saints drew up a covenant called the Mayflower Compact which established a rudimentary legal authority for the colony.

This agreement was designed not only to provide a basis for law and order but to give the framers (the saints) the chance to run things. They agreed to form their own government, elect officers to pass and administer laws and be bound by the laws and ordinances thus enacted. The signatures of enough non-saints to validate the Compact were obtained and the company proceeded to elect John Carver as the first new world governor chosen by free people in a free election.

The Mayflower Compact served as an example for the establishment of governments by settlers in later colonies in Connecticut, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. It helped establish the American tradition of government resting upon the consent of the governed and was the first milestone on the road to independence.

Despite the many deaths that first winter and continuing hardships, Plymouth Colony survived and slowly began to prosper in a modest way. During the summer of 1623 two ships, the Anne and the Little James, arrived with eighty-seven more settlers. Twenty-nine were from the Leyden congregation. Among the passengers was Alice Southworth who within a few weeks married William Bradford and whose great-granddaughter married Aaron Brownell.


As the years passed still more settlers came to Plymouth until in 1630 the population was around 300. The last of the Leyden congregation arrived in May 1630 on the ship Handmaid.

Plymouth did not, however, have the essentials for growth that other colonies would have. Its farm land was not good and the colony was poorly located for the fur trade and fishing. It remained small and was soon overshadowed by the Massachusetts Bay Colony which it had inspired.

Governor Bradford many years later summed up the significance of Plymouth Colony when he wrote, "as one small candle may light a thousand, so the light here kindled hath shown unto many, yea, in some sort, to our whole nation."

Descendents of four men who came to America on the Mayflower--John Alden, Francis Cooke, William Mullins and George Soule--married into the Brownell Family. At least three Brownell lines are thus Mayflower lines.

While it was the Pilgrims who by their example led the way for the English colonization of New England, it was the Puritans who were to have the most enduring effect upon not only the religious, but also the political, social and economic aspects of life in New England, and to a large extent, of all Americans.

The "Great Migration" of English people was caused, as was discussed in the first issue of The Brownell Chronicle, by a number of factors, with religious and economic issues being the primary motivation for emigration to the New World. As we have seen, most of these emigrants went to the southern colonies and the West Indies, while about 21,000 chose to go to New England.

For a majority of these people, religious issues were dominant. The religious climate in England had steadily deteriorated. James I died in 1625 and was succeeded by his son, Charles I, who was married to a Catholic, Henrietta. Persecution of non-conformists had increased under Charles I and William Laud who was first appointed Bishop of London and later Archbishop of Canterbury. The Puritans, who were seeking to reform the Church of England from within, despaired of ever making the desired changes. As pressure on the Puritans increased, the prospect of establishing a colony in the New World which would be governed by their religious beliefs began to seem more appealing.

In 1628 a small group of about sixty people under the leadership of John Endicott settled Salem, Massachusetts, under a grant from the Council for New England. The following year the Puritan merchants who financed this small expedition obtained a royal charter and formed themselves into the Massachusetts Bay Company. Another group of about 350 colonists was sent to join those at Salem.

This new company quickly attracted the attention of other Puritans of the "middling sort" who were becoming increasingly convinced that they would no longer be able to practice their religion freely in England. These "Congregationalists" who now looked to the Massachusetts Bay Company for a solution to their problems remained committed to the goal of reforming the Church of England. But they realized that it might be better to pursue that goal in America rather than at home.

In October of 1629 the members, or stockholders, of the Company elected John Winthrop as their governor. It was Winthrop who began to organize the initial phase of the great Puritan migration to America. During the spring and summer of 1630 a total of seventeen ships left England for Massachusetts Bay, carrying about one thousand settlers. Thanks to Winthrop and other Puritan leaders, the expedition was well-planned and well-financed. After a first attempt to settle in the area that is now Charlestown failed because of the lack of running water and poor sanitary conditions, the settlers moved to Boston and the Massachusetts Bay Colony was born.

In the decade following 1630, the colony's growth was extraordinarily rapid. By 1641 it is estimated that three hundred vessels carrying twenty thousand passengers had crossed the Atlantic. These colonists dispersed rapidly, establishing by 1640 twenty-two settlements in addition to Boston. While each of these communities chose and supported their own ministers, the General Court in Boston ruled the colony and set the standards for the religious and civil governments.

These Puritans had a definite mission-to establish a community where they could put their ideals into practice. New England was, to them, a new "promised land" which God had set apart for an experiment in Christian living. As Winthrop said on the way to America, they were like "a city upon a hill, with the eyes of all people" upon them. It was their intent to establish a model community, a Bible Commonwealth, based upon what the Scriptures revealed of God's intent, a society centered on a community of Saints-God's Elect, His chosen people. They saw themselves as being engaged upon a noble experiment for the benefit of the rest of mankind.

In these Puritan communities, the individual's needs were subordinate to those of the group's and secular authority joined with religious authority to impose total, unbending orthodoxy of belief and behavior upon every member. This orthodoxy was not confined to the church and religious matters, but was also expected to be followed in a man's family relations (authoritarian, unbending), business dealings (hard-working, thrifty), and even recreations (limited, tending to be more useful than pleasurable). Deviation was quickly and harshly punished--expulsion was among the milder forms.

The Puritans were not fighting for religious freedom when they opposed the established Church of England. They were fighting for the right to replace that authority with one of their own. Democracy, religious toleration and separation of church and state were equally distasteful to the ruling elders. From the start, the Bay Colony confined voting to members of the approved Puritan churches, denied freedom of speech to its opponents and insisted that all persons subject themselves to the authority of its magistrates.

The life of the colony and of its people, the clothes they should wear, the length of their hair, their labors and pastimes, were all supervised and regulated in accordance with the clergy's interpretation of the scriptures. Cards and dice were banned. Cooking, making beds, sweeping, shaving, running were forbidden on the Lord's Day, and that woeful day began at three o'clock in the afternoon on Saturday.

Because Christmas, New Years and other holidays were holy days in the Catholic Church, their observance was prohibited. Even the familiar names of months were discarded, because they had been bestowed by pagan emperors and by popes, and numbers were substituted. Since the ministers said that they could find no authority in the Bible for church weddings or church funerals, marriages were performed by civil magistrates, and the dead were buried with a sermon, a song or a prayer.

In creating a government, Winthrop and the small group of church leaders began with the charter's stipulation that the freemen (stockholders) of the company should make all laws for governing the colony and elect a governor, deputy governor, and eighteen assistants (a chairman and board of directors) to execute the laws and preside between the quarterly meetings of the shareholders. This was a fairly standard procedure for business corporations, then as now. But this company was attempting to adapt the structure of an economic institution to purposes for which it was not intended-the actual government of the colony.

In an unprecedented move designed to further their purposes, the Congregationalist merchants had decided before leaving England to transfer the charter and the headquarters of the Massachusetts Bay Company to New England-what the Crown had given, the Crown could take away. Thus the settlers would be answerable to no one in the mother country, and would be able to handle their affairs, secular and religious, as they pleased.

The Puritans gradually transformed the General Court, officially merely the company's governing body or board of directors, into a colonial legislature and opened the status of "freeman," or voting member of the company, to all adult male church members. Still, four-fifths of the men of voting age were not allowed to vote, because a large proportion of the colonists were not members of the Congregational Church. Even the Puritans were not all permitted to join the church. The law compelled every one to attend services. But the ministers had the power to say who should be admitted to membership, and they kept the churches small and select.

At the same time, Winthrop and his followers pushed through the proposition that the freemen would confine themselves at their annual meeting to electing assistants. These assistants, in turn, would choose the governor and deputy governor and assume the lawmaking power. They had expanded the charter on the one hand by increasing the number of freemen who could vote and contracted it on the other by transferring the lawmaking power from the freemen to the assistants, who together with the governor, now in fact held all of the legislative, executive and judicial authority in the new government.

This was, however, short lived. In 1632 the General Court voted that each town would thereafter elect two deputies to serve, along with the Governor and assistants, as the legislative body. In 1641 the General Court drew up a code of laws for the colony. Three years later, the General Court was divided into a bicameral body, with an upper house composed of the assistants and a lower house composed of the two elected deputies from each town. This Puritan experiment in self-government served as an example for future New England colonies, and, to a large extent, for most later state governments as well as our federal government.

By the end of the 1630's, emigration from England had greatly decreased. With the political situation there moving closer and closer to civil war, Puritans were less likely to leave*they remained at home where they took up arms against the king, beheaded him, and made England herself a Puritan commonwealth.

seclark
03-07-2007, 03:14 PM
i'm thinking the quakers ate lots of oatmeal.
sec

Adept Havelock
03-07-2007, 03:15 PM
First you need the Chalice from the Palace...or was it the Vessel with the Pestle?

:hmmm:

Either way, I know that consuming only grain alcohol and rainwater was a key part of maintaining the purity of our bodily essences and getting closer to the divine...or further away from communists. Or something like that.

el borracho
03-07-2007, 03:31 PM
smear chicken blood on your face and kill your first born
Looks like you posted in the wrong thread. You probably wanted to post that here:http://chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=159382

crispystl420
03-07-2007, 04:01 PM
which church? And what do you mean early New England - 1500's, 1700's? I can answer this question for you, but I just need some greater details...

All the question says is early New England however I'm sure he is implying the puritans. I understand the puritan development and movement I just don't know what the exact details of joining are.

thank you very much

Jilly
03-07-2007, 04:55 PM
All the question says is early New England however I'm sure he is implying the puritans. I understand the puritan development and movement I just don't know what the exact details of joining are.

thank you very much

So, I've looked through old college notes, 4 different Religion in Early America books and short of looking through the vast world of the internet, all I can find are the basic theological tenets of the Puritan faith. I could find a bit on Quakers though...

I even dug through this History of Women in Christian Worship book just to see if by accident I found something....

I can't find anything specific on Puritans...but their roots go to Europe, really and they were very closely connected to the Anglican church, without the gov't ties....so you might search that.

Sorry I couldn't help.

JBucc
03-07-2007, 05:05 PM
IIRC, you have to have had some sort of miracle (I don't think it was considered an actual miracle, but I can't remember if there is a term for it) or something where God basically deemed you good enough to enter the church. I don't know any specifics of what those might have been. And you had to be able to prove this happened. You probably had to be a certain age too.

I may be wrong. In fact I probably am.

HolmeZz
03-07-2007, 05:07 PM
You had to stone a witch.

Jilly
03-07-2007, 05:10 PM
IIRC, you have to have had some sort of miracle (I don't think it was considered an actual miracle, but I can't remember if there is a term for it) or something where God basically deemed you good enough to enter the church. I don't know any specifics of what those might have been. And you had to be able to prove this happened. You probably had to be a certain age too.

I may be wrong. In fact I probably am.

wait - were we trying to figure out how to become a Saint??!!!!

Fairplay
03-07-2007, 05:14 PM
Heres todays process dude...........
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/SjwMFVC43xM"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/SjwMFVC43xM" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

crispystl420
03-07-2007, 05:16 PM
So, I've looked through old college notes, 4 different Religion in Early America books and short of looking through the vast world of the internet, all I can find are the basic theological tenets of the Puritan faith. I could find a bit on Quakers though...

I even dug through this History of Women in Christian Worship book just to see if by accident I found something....

I can't find anything specific on Puritans...but their roots go to Europe, really and they were very closely connected to the Anglican church, without the gov't ties....so you might search that.

Sorry I couldn't help.

Thanks you didn't have to do al that though! Thats all I can find too. At least I'm not the only one who can't find anyhting about it.

crispystl420
03-07-2007, 05:17 PM
IIRC, you have to have had some sort of miracle (I don't think it was considered an actual miracle, but I can't remember if there is a term for it) or something where God basically deemed you good enough to enter the church. I don't know any specifics of what those might have been. And you had to be able to prove this happened. You probably had to be a certain age too.

I may be wrong. In fact I probably am.

Hey, thats the best I've gotten all day.

Jenson71
03-07-2007, 06:40 PM
Hey, thats the best I've gotten all day.

Just talk about Rhode Island. Everything was a whole lot easier in Rhode Island at the time.

CHIEF4EVER
03-07-2007, 07:13 PM
None of you stupid people know anything. It was simple. First, you had to bring a shrubbery. THEN, you had to cut down the mightiest tree in the forest with a herring.

tiptap
03-07-2007, 07:57 PM
The earlier article on Puritians seems right. The Puritans tended to be Calvanist. As such you had to be elected by GOD and of course only those elected recognized each other. So of course if you were a Puritan in good standing and already a member you had a duty to secure membership of just the Elected. In other words it was a good ole boys club.

cdcox
03-07-2007, 07:59 PM
I don't thing too many people "joined" the church back in those days. You were already in it. If you missed church on Sunday, you better be dead or ready for the witch trial.