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Phobia
05-09-2007, 11:20 AM
This year is the first time in my adult life that I've planted a garden. We did it plenty as a kid, but of course I don't remember anything in particular that we did.

It's essentially a pico de gallo garden with tomatos, jalapeno, cilantro, garlic, and onion planted.

I've read that buying lady bugs and releasing them in your garden will keep the plants clean and disease free. Also planting garlic around the perimeter will keep critters away.

I also have some low ground behind my shop that is kinda swampy. My neighbor suggested that I plant some pumpkins and watermelon to soak up some of that water. I've taken his suggestion.

I also have started a stinky compost pile but don't really know what I'm doing with it.

Please share your tips and tricks with the Planet.

chief husker
05-09-2007, 11:38 AM
You can also order Praying Mantis for the garden. Way too cool. They come in little egg cases, and then hatch in the garden. By late fall you may have a number of these large, harmless, bug eaters flying around. Word to the wise. Take egg cases straight to the garden. Mrs. Husker freaked a little when they hatched in the kitchen. Hundreds of little, but fully formed Mantis all over the walls and ceiling. Also, since you fish, you can put what is left after cleaning at the bottom of your planting. Have fun.

Phobia
05-09-2007, 11:42 AM
Also, since you fish, you can put what is left after cleaning at the bottom of your planting. Have fun.

Well, I don't know about that. I haven't fished seriously since the last time I had a garden. Got all my equipment stolen in High School and lost interest after that. I have some cheap equipment again but it's mostly for taking the kids out on the weekend. I haven't thrown a line in the water for 3 years.

Redrum_69
05-09-2007, 11:50 AM
Well, I don't know about that. I haven't fished seriously since the last time I had a garden. Got all my equipment stolen in High School and lost interest after that. I have some cheap equipment again but it's mostly for taking the kids out on the weekend. I haven't thrown a line in the water for 3 years.



On that note...you can eat what you catch out of my pond...I think my fish will be safe that day.

El Jefe
05-09-2007, 11:56 AM
On that note...you can eat what you catch out of my pond...I think my fish will be safe that day.


Man you are like the King of Punchline jokes, and mom jokes, funny stuff. You dont have to be great to fish, theres something about it that calms me down a lot and sometimes I dont catch anything but thats ok because I enjoyed the atmosphere.

Smed1065
05-09-2007, 11:58 AM
Treat the garden like you do CP and it should be great with all that fertilizer!




Raiduhs

Mr. Plow
05-09-2007, 12:01 PM
Man you are like the King of Punchline jokes, and mom jokes, funny stuff.


Careful.....you're about to unleash the beast.

Kclee
05-09-2007, 12:05 PM
Blood Meal is suppose to keep rabbits away and it pretty good for the plants as well. Also, get some Preen sprinkled into your garden to keep out the weeds. Sounds like you need some Bell Peppers in there too.

DaFace
05-09-2007, 12:06 PM
Antifreeze? :shrug:

Redrum_69
05-09-2007, 12:06 PM
On that note...you can eat what you catch out of my pond...I think my fish will be safe that day.


Man you are like the King of Punchline jokes, and mom jokes, funny stuff. You dont have to be great to fish, theres something about it that calms me down a lot and sometimes I dont catch anything but thats ok because I enjoyed the atmosphere.



That wasnt a slam on phobias fishing technique. I'm just stating that the fish in the pond wont bite on your every day average lure. The bass have only been caught on one lure.

My neighbor came over this past weekend. He fished for 3 hours in the morning and 3 more hours in the afternoon. He never got a bite. I seen him use a spinner/rooster tail, then a crankbait, jig/pig, texas rig worm, spinnerbait, and finally a topwater plug/popper. I went outside after I seen he was done and took a cast with the lure that I make. I caught a bass right in front of him.

I then let him take a few casts with the lure. He caught a real nice bass. Its the same lure I showed the video of at phobias bbq.

I've been working on the style and presentation of this lure for over 12 years.

Baby Lee
05-09-2007, 12:14 PM
That wasnt a slam on phobias fishing technique. I'm just stating that the fish in the pond wont bite on your every day average lure. The bass have only been caught on one lure.

My neighbor came over this past weekend. He fished for 3 hours in the morning and 3 more hours in the afternoon. He never got a bite. I seen him use a spinner/rooster tail, then a crankbait, jig/pig, texas rig worm, spinnerbait, and finally a topwater plug/popper. I went outside after I seen he was done and took a cast with the lure that I make. I caught a bass right in front of him.

I then let him take a few casts with the lure. He caught a real nice bass. Its the same lure I showed the video of at phobias bbq.

I've been working on the style and presentation of this lure for over 12 years.
http://www.spacegravy.com/sgmedia/graphics/oneliners/movies/NapoleonDynamite.gif

penguinz
05-09-2007, 12:14 PM
Do some "lasagna" gardening. All you have to do is layer your materials in your garden. IE. Chopped up brown leaves, compost, grass, peat, leaves, compost, etc...

This is how I do all my garden areas and our veggies end up producing like mad.

ChiTown
05-09-2007, 12:33 PM
I mow my grass once a week. It's true. Feel free to pass this luscious tidbit of information to your friends......

El Jefe
05-09-2007, 12:46 PM
redrum_69, I am pretty confident in my skills I bet I could catch one with my arsenal. Actually I can gurantee I could catch one barring I had a couple days in case one day was just an off day, or bad weather.

El Jefe
05-09-2007, 12:48 PM
You must have some crazy knowledge to make your own lures, that isnt an easy trade.

seclark
05-09-2007, 12:54 PM
You must have some crazy knowledge to make your own lures, that isnt an easy trade.

spotted owl feathers make great fly fishing lures.

and gardening is womens work.
sec

El Jefe
05-09-2007, 01:09 PM
and gardening is womens work.


I dont agree with that unless its a tiny garden. My grandpa has a garden thats almost an acre, its massive and he is in it everyday, its a lot of work when you have something that big. He has cucumbers, tomatoes, beans, watermelon,canteloupe, peppers, corn, squash, and a few other things I forget, oh radishes.

BigOlChiefsfan
05-09-2007, 01:14 PM
Here's a tip for your punkins and melons. Pick up some scrap shingles or boards on any construction site. When the melons/punkins get about softball sized, slip a board under them. This keeps them off the soil, prevents a few problems as they grow. It's good that they're in a soggy spot, but feed those melons and pumpkins, they're ravenous plants. I'd throw some miracle grow in a sprinkler can, add water and pour it on them once every couple of weeks. If you go fishing, put the fish guts, heads, bones into a bucket and fill with water. Pour the water on the plants once a week - refill with water a few times then bury the 'goop' beside the plants every few weeks, and go fishing again. Bloodmeal isn't necessary on these if you use the fish emulsion. Some wood ashes around the plant won't hurt to restore some potassium...or is it phosphorus? Whatever, wood ash is good, so is a product called greensand, it provides the other part of the NPK requirement that bloodmean/fish, woodash doesn't provide.

Mulch well around your tomatoes and melons. I use newspaper, about an inch thick about 2 feet in any direction. Wet it down and it dries like concrete, then cover it with a bag of wood chips or just use lawn clippings, whatever. Keeps the plants water from wet/dry cycles and helps prevent 'blossum end rot'. The big boys use red mulch on tomato plants as it reflects some special blah blah. Whatever. If you've got red mulch use it, but use some kind of mulch.

Buy some 'miracle grow just for tomatoes', mix up according to instructions and pour it on. I'm all for organic gardening, but I swear by miracle grow for tomatoes.

Check the tomato plants for worms once or twice a week (get the kids to help, they'll enjoy it). Put in some TALL stakes now, and tie the plants up as they grow. Be sure there's a couple - 3 feet between plants.

Next year, don't plant peppers or tomatoes where they're growing this year. They pass diseases to each other, so don't plant tomatoes where tomatoes OR peppers are, vice versa. You'll need to rotate new space for them every year. Start your 'next years garden' this year by piling up your lawn clippings and leaves (pile about 6 - 10 inches deep) where you want to grow next year. Let the worms do your composting for you. Put your blood meal on the leaves this fall.

Peppers and tomatoes need regular watering. Give them about an inch of water (set a can there to check). I water these plants early in the day, and I try NOT to get their leaves wet (some diseases start on wet tomato leaves).

If you haven't planted any of these, go buy some Brandywine tomatoes, or Carmello or Dona tomato plants. Different varieties have different virtues, these 3 are the best I've found for slicing and eating raw. My favorites. Grow San Marzano or Roma for your salsa but try a few of these as well.

Buy a Serrano pepper plant, maybe a Thai chile as well. No reason to limit salsa to just jalapenos.

Plant garlic about early september this fall in some rich dirt. It'll 'winter over' and you'll have fresh garlic next year.

tooge
05-09-2007, 01:29 PM
I have a huge garden and although I like the idea, organic is too much of a pain in the arse for me. compsting is easy, just throw your kitchen waste, leaves, grass clippings into a pile, then add a cupfull of fertilizer to get it started, or you can just throw a couple of shovels full of dirt over it. Then (here is the key) make sure to turn it about every ten days or so. Use this around your plants over the newspaper as mulch. It will be great soil next year. As for the Maters, I agree that brandywine is one of the best, although they dont produce bunches like some of the hybrids. Try a string trellis for your tomato support, it is easier than staking I think. At the end of each row of tomatoes place two heavy stakes. then simply run twin or wire from one end to th other about 2 feet high and about 3 feet high. you have a perfect support that you can leave for next year. Oh, and try berries. They have to be the best kept secret here in KC area. They grow great, are super easy to manage, grow the best tasing berries you ever had, and are ultra good for you and the kids. Rasberries and blackberries grow like weeds and make the store bought kind taste like crap. Free too.

Kclee
05-09-2007, 01:30 PM
Also, egg shells and banana peels around the base of the plants too.

NewChief
05-09-2007, 01:32 PM
I'd like to try some of my bass flies on RR's pond some time. I bet I could lure one to take.

Chief Henry
05-09-2007, 02:22 PM
I've been planing about 35-40 geraniums every
summer for the last 4 years. Before that it was about 24 geraniums
per year. They are hearty plants that don't need alot of tlc.

I love flowers and they sure add life and color to ones yard. I've been planting some hostas the last couple of years as a border i have with some county conservation property that borders our yard. We have no neighboors to the west of u and no neighboors directly behind us. Thats great and very private :)

I planetd two tomato plants last summer right next to a planter that was filled with deep purple petunia's. The deer kept eating the
tomato plants. I don't think I'll try any gardens for a long time. But
I'll keep planting my flowers :)

NewChief
05-09-2007, 02:27 PM
I've been planing about 35-40 geraniums every
summer for the last 4 years. Before that it was about 24 geraniums. They are hearty plants that don't need alot of tlc.

I love flowers and they sure add life and color to
ones yard. I've been planting some hostas the last couple of years as a border i have with some county conservation property that borders our yard. We have no neighboors to the west of u and no neighboors directly behind us. Thats great
and very private :)

We have a pretty nice perennial garden. Day lillies are our dominant flower, because my mom has an absolute ton of exotics that she's shared with us. I'd actually post some pictures from our garden if people wouldn't question my sexuality.

I really dig gardening. It's meditative. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to do it was much lately because I've been too busy remodeling.

Baby Lee
05-09-2007, 02:28 PM
I've been blessed with the most fertile soil in Big Derrty, methinks.
The first time I turned over the soil in my flower garden, there were earthworms toiling away the size of Dune Sandworms.
My one initial Hosta has been seperated into 5 Hostas each about the size of an ottoman.
My one inital Iris is now a labrynth about 4 feet in diameter. I was going to separate it into individual bulbs this spring, but held off d/t the freeze [give it a chance to rebound]. It now have about 40 blooms. My Mom's Tiger Lillies, succombed to the freeze, but mine are thriving, already knee high.
All in a little strip 2 feet by 10 feet in front of my sidewalk/porch.

DenverChief
05-09-2007, 03:00 PM
I really dig gardening. It's meditative.

I agree but my gig is lawn care....love the weeding and feralizing....front yard is pretty easy to take care of the back yard is in trouble.....

Stewie
05-09-2007, 03:03 PM
If you're doing Beefsteak tomatoes or other large varieties make sure they have good support. Either a good stake and ties or a tomato ladder. I used those cheap tomato cages once and when the plants got big they destroyed the cage.

Iowanian
05-09-2007, 03:11 PM
Get a load of cattle lot soil/compost(that has been piled for at least 2 years) and put a layer on top of your garden and till it in. If you don't use feedlot compost that has sat for a couple of years, it will likely have too much organic material and will be too loose and will lose moisture.

the Talking Can
05-09-2007, 03:28 PM
Get a load of cattle lot soil/compost(that has been piled for at least 2 years) and put a layer on top of your garden and till it in. If you don't use feedlot compost that has sat for a couple of years, it will likely have too much organic material and will be too loose and will lose moisture.

or, if you can't find that, just use redrum's mom's panties...

Iowanian
05-09-2007, 03:30 PM
Thats what I use instead of roundup to kill weeds and grass in the driveway. Put a clam skidmark over the hose and spray.

Skip Towne
05-09-2007, 03:38 PM
When selecting a tomato plant, I always choose an indeterminate variety. They will keep producing fruit until a freeze gets them. The determinate varieties produce X amount of fruit then die.

MOhillbilly
05-09-2007, 03:45 PM
put some bonemeal in your tomato hole and abit of 3-13 on it after theyre planted.

Fish
05-09-2007, 03:47 PM
If you have a large(55 gal) fish aquarium, when you do a water change, take the water and fish turds you clean from the tank and dump it in your garden. Great stuff to water with.

the Talking Can
05-09-2007, 03:48 PM
put some bonemeal in your tomato hole...

kinky

stlchiefs
05-09-2007, 04:08 PM
kinky

Yeah, I don't know if I could squirt any out over a tomato plant. They just don't do it for me like a jalapeņo does. :whackit:

suds79
05-09-2007, 04:12 PM
If you have a large(55 gal) fish aquarium, when you do a water change, take the water and fish turds you clean from the tank and dump it in your garden. Great stuff to water with.

Are you serious?

Perhaps it's different but I do know that you're not suppose to put your animal's (Ex: dogs) turds in your compost heap. It's toxic.

boogblaster
05-09-2007, 04:24 PM
Any type of Rapid or Mircle Gro. products work well in the garden..add Epson Salt to your mix it works really good on tomatoes after they start puttin on fruit..also next to your tomato bury a small 303 can with holes poked in the bottom..feeds your roots this way..fill the can till it stays full.. probably every week to ten days ....

Stewie
05-09-2007, 04:29 PM
303 can

Is that SS? Or a size? If SS, why would that matter?

Skip Towne
05-09-2007, 07:51 PM
For fertilizer, use manure from animals with 4 stomachs only. Goats, sheep and cattle for example. Horses and donkeys have only one stomach and weed seed can easily survive the digestion process.

NewChief
05-09-2007, 08:32 PM
Here's a couple of pictures:

NewChief
05-09-2007, 08:52 PM
By the way,

I come by it honest. Here is one landscaping feature at my mom's house. There's about 4 acres of gardens landscaped at this level. Another 12 acres are undeveloped/wild. Nice place to grow up, even though it wasn't quite this immaculate when we were running around the place.

boogblaster
05-09-2007, 09:02 PM
303 is a standard size like vegies come in ....

NewChief
05-09-2007, 09:04 PM
Here's a couple of pictures:

Same bed, early this spring. The cold snap put a hurt on it, but it's coming back, now. Another month, and it should be awesome.

Smed1065
05-09-2007, 09:12 PM
303 is a standard size like vegies come in ....

Must work in groceries or a warehouse?

stlchiefs
05-09-2007, 09:42 PM
Alright with all these gardening tips and tricks, I need some help from the experts. I am trying some container gardening this year (tomato, jalapeņos, peppers, strawberries). The area where my pots are backs up to a a fairly wooded area and some creature of the night has been making a tasty treat out of my strawberries (all 7 of them). So now that my strawberries are gone I fear for my other plants when they start to get fruit on them.
What do I do so that I can try my veggies instead of feeding the animals? Any large fence, contraption, etc. won't do because that defeats the whole container gardening purpose. I have tomato cages in my tomato plants would it help to wrap chicken wire around these? HELP the damn critters are eating the fruits of my labor.

RJ
05-09-2007, 10:42 PM
kinky


Good one.

Halfcan
05-09-2007, 10:54 PM
put up a rabbit proof fence-those suckers will eat ya out of house and home

stlchiefs
05-09-2007, 11:04 PM
put up a rabbit proof fence-those suckers will eat ya out of house and home

If that was directed at my post, my problem is I can't put up any fence. The reason I'm doing container is to keep it small and everything is landscaped. Would it make sense to "fence" in each pot by circling a piece of chicken wire around it to form a little tube?

Phobia
05-09-2007, 11:07 PM
Try making a perimeter of garlic pots. I heard critters hate it.

stlchiefs
05-09-2007, 11:19 PM
Try making a perimeter of garlic pots. I heard critters hate it.

Actually plant garlic in some pots or just sprinkle it around the pots (as if to keep Dracula away)?

This fun idea of container gardening is getting to be a bitch. The early freeze killed my blackberry plant and the damn animals are eating my strawberries. Mother Nature is currently owning my azz.

Phobia
05-10-2007, 06:56 AM
Plant garlic in some pots. You might even plant it in the tomato pots.

Skip Towne
05-10-2007, 07:52 AM
Actually plant garlic in some pots or just sprinkle it around the pots (as if to keep Dracula away)?

This fun idea of container gardening is getting to be a bitch. The early freeze killed my blackberry plant and the damn animals are eating my strawberries. Mother Nature is currently owning my azz.
Get some rabbit repellent. I think Wal-Mart has it in spray cans.

Iowanian
05-10-2007, 07:57 AM
This is excellent rabbit repellant. Very effective. See Results INSTANTLY!

http://www.airsoftadventure.co.uk/ishop/images/1066/crosman_rabitstopper.jpg

MOhillbilly
05-10-2007, 08:02 AM
Get some rabbit repellent. I think Wal-Mart has it in spray cans.

that shit dont work.

tooge
05-10-2007, 08:14 AM
Alright with all these gardening tips and tricks, I need some help from the experts. I am trying some container gardening this year (tomato, jalapeņos, peppers, strawberries). The area where my pots are backs up to a a fairly wooded area and some creature of the night has been making a tasty treat out of my strawberries (all 7 of them). So now that my strawberries are gone I fear for my other plants when they start to get fruit on them.
What do I do so that I can try my veggies instead of feeding the animals? Any large fence, contraption, etc. won't do because that defeats the whole container gardening purpose. I have tomato cages in my tomato plants would it help to wrap chicken wire around these? HELP the damn critters are eating the fruits of my labor.

I have a large Labrador retriever that generates a ton of hair. What I do is buy a pair of pantyhose (have your wife do it or you will look like a perv) and make pantyhose balls filled with dog hair. Hang these from a stick next to your container, and nothing will bother the plants or the fruit. It lasts about a month or so, then just do it again. It only takes a few minutes twice a summer and you will get to harvest your fruit. If you dont have a dog, go to pets mart and they will give you some hair from the floor of the grooming area. I know it sounds nasty, but you cant smell it and it works.

NewChief
05-10-2007, 08:24 AM
I have a large Labrador retriever that generates a ton of hair. What I do is buy a pair of pantyhose (have your wife do it or you will look like a perv) and make pantyhose balls filled with dog hair. Hang these from a stick next to your container, and nothing will bother the plants or the fruit. It lasts about a month or so, then just do it again. It only takes a few minutes twice a summer and you will get to harvest your fruit. If you dont have a dog, go to pets mart and they will give you some hair from the floor of the grooming area. I know it sounds nasty, but you cant smell it and it works.

Human hair also works. My wife usually gets a bag from the salon when she goes in for a hair cut. We just spread it around the garden. Like you said, it's kind of gross, but it works.

KC Kings
05-10-2007, 08:43 AM
If that was directed at my post, my problem is I can't put up any fence. The reason I'm doing container is to keep it small and everything is landscaped. Would it make sense to "fence" in each pot by circling a piece of chicken wire around it to form a little tube?

I did the chicken wire fence around a blueberry bush, but it looks tacky and bends easy so it is kind of a pain.

This is the first year in the last 5 years that I have not planted any hanging tomato plants, but if you have little critters eating your tomatoes that is the easiest solution.

Take 5 gallon bucket, and cut out a 2 inch hole in the middle of the bottom. Buy some coconut basket mesh from any hardware store, cut out a piece to fit over your hole, the cut a slit in it to the middle. Slide a tomato plant into the hole and get the mesh nice a tight around it, then pack in dirt around the roots. You will have the planrt growing out of the bottom of the bucket, and the last couple of year as they were hanging under my deck I planted a citrosa plant on the top to keep the mosquitoes away from the deck. this method eliminates the need for staking, protects your plants from small animals, and since it is off the ground you won't get any tomato worms.

stlchiefs
05-10-2007, 12:58 PM
I have a large Labrador retriever that generates a ton of hair. What I do is buy a pair of pantyhose (have your wife do it or you will look like a perv) and make pantyhose balls filled with dog hair. Hang these from a stick next to your container, and nothing will bother the plants or the fruit. It lasts about a month or so, then just do it again. It only takes a few minutes twice a summer and you will get to harvest your fruit. If you dont have a dog, go to pets mart and they will give you some hair from the floor of the grooming area. I know it sounds nasty, but you cant smell it and it works.

I'll have to try this one. I have a lab as well so the hair is NOT a problem. Now if I could just get her to do all the shedding around the plants I'd kill 2 birds with 1 stone.

stlchiefs
05-10-2007, 12:58 PM
I did the chicken wire fence around a blueberry bush, but it looks tacky and bends easy so it is kind of a pain.

This is the first year in the last 5 years that I have not planted any hanging tomato plants, but if you have little critters eating your tomatoes that is the easiest solution.

Take 5 gallon bucket, and cut out a 2 inch hole in the middle of the bottom. Buy some coconut basket mesh from any hardware store, cut out a piece to fit over your hole, the cut a slit in it to the middle. Slide a tomato plant into the hole and get the mesh nice a tight around it, then pack in dirt around the roots. You will have the planrt growing out of the bottom of the bucket, and the last couple of year as they were hanging under my deck I planted a citrosa plant on the top to keep the mosquitoes away from the deck. this method eliminates the need for staking, protects your plants from small animals, and since it is off the ground you won't get any tomato worms.

I already have something planted, but this sounds like a cool idea to try next year. I actually thought about trying the hanging plants, but already had pots sitting around so I just used what I had.

KC Kings
05-10-2007, 02:28 PM
It kind of depends on what you are growing and what is eating your plants. My dad has a good sized garden and the deer at longview eat everything. Tomatoes, habeneros, ornamental gourd, grape vine, if it is green, they will eat it. You can spray Deer Off on it, but the stuff smells like rotten animal feces so I wouldn't suggest putting it on any edible parts.

Sometime the varmin will eat the plant when they are young and tender, but once they get bigger they leave them alone. Sometimes you can mix differnt plants together to keep animals away. Marigolds are supposed to keep turtles away from tomatoes. I always put a dafodil (poison) in the same whole as my tulip bulbd to keep the rabbits out of them.

Delano
05-10-2007, 05:22 PM
After consuming the best slice of watermelon in my life, I was told that it was grown on my God-Father's manure pile.

A pile of shit is probably not an option in city limits though.

Easy 6
05-10-2007, 08:04 PM
The more often you turn that compost heap with a rake or pitchfork, the faster it will breakdown to what you want.

HemiEd
05-10-2007, 08:38 PM
I had a neighbor, that told me to beat my tomatoe vines with a stick. He said it would prevent the vines from consuming all the nutrients and the tomatoes would be healthier. I never tried it though, it just didn't seem right, they are defenseless.

BigOlChiefsfan
05-11-2007, 05:29 PM
Oh I beat my tomato vines. But I tell everyone the vines just 'walked into a door'.

Skip Towne
05-11-2007, 06:16 PM
I once grew a tomato plant taller than my house. The local paper came out and took pics of it. I started it outside in February inside a "wall o' water" and I picked off all of the suckers except two I allowed to get tall. After growing for 8 months it was nearly 15' tall.