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T-post Tom
05-13-2007, 11:37 PM
Since the percentage of 1st page "Green/Miami/DraftPicks/Chambers/Damn You Carl" threads has dipped below 50%; I thought I would toss in this perspective of another Miami pundit. His story is not about Green. But it does give you a portrait of the Miami brain trust. After all, we are talking about the team that picked Ginn-in-a-boot over all others.

By this pundit's perspective (& considering that Carl dropped his offer from a 2nd rounder to a 4th rounder while Miami countered with a 'fug you'...), you might consider that maybe Carl isn't the only one at fault here. (... Or maybe not. Your call.)

HYDE: Never has a Dolphins era begun with lower expectations
Cameron, Mueller must rely on instinct instead of bluster.

Published May 6, 2007


DAVIE -- Somewhere along the way, it's become difficult for Dolphins fans to hear all those sweet stories from a few decades ago when their team actually had all the answers. Oh, it's still fun to hear how Don Shula asked players to offer plays for that week's game, and Larry Csonka always would offer the same handoff to him up the gut.

"P-10," Csonka would yell.

"Why that?" Shula would say.

"Let's hit them in the face and see if they get up," he said.

But let's face it: They haven't made stories like that about the Dolphins in too long. In recent years, the stories have to do with people who only thought they had all the answers: Jimmy Johnson questioning everyone but himself; Dave Wannstedt wondering why people didn't understand passing on quarterback Drew Brees for cornerback Jamar Fletcher; or Nick Saban acting like people evidently do on his planet.

So this is what you notice about this newest Dolphins era: There's no purported genius at work anymore. No gibberish about what they've done in the past, photos of victories somewhere else or even silly signs lining the hallway like Saban had ("Out Of Yourself And Into The Team").

Of course, that's because neither General Manager Randy Mueller nor coach Cam Cameron has won big anywhere. Cameron couldn't win much in college in his only head-coaching stint. Mueller's career detoured to ESPN for a couple of years.

Even in the aftermath of this draft that will carve their success or failure, you heard Mueller say, "We're not saying we have all the answers." And Cameron said, "We did our work, made this plan and followed it and now we'll see how it works."

So never has a Dolphins era begun with this perfect storm of fewer players, less fanfare, lower expectations or actual, genuine humility. It's a sinkhole of issues, if you at look at it like that. And some do. Or it's really the best way to win in the NFL.

Getting a Bill Parcells is great for ticket sales and optimism. It's a card the Dolphins played with Johnson and Saban. And with good reason in both cases. But big-name coaches are tied to their quarterbacks, the career lifeline stretching two ways.

Meanwhile, when Sean Payton went to New Orleans and Eric Mangini went to New York last offseason, there were as many questions about them as there are about Mueller or Cameron today. Yet both showed if you get a healthy quarterback, it makes so much else right.

That's why all you have to do for this Dolphin regime is all you've had to do with any louder, more egotistical one: Watch the quarterback. Johnson and Dan Marino didn't work together. That era failed. Wannstedt had the only good coaching season of the last decade in his first year, but he ultimately failed because Jay Fiedler was limited. Saban failed because the gamble on Daunte Culpepper failed.

One question will hover over all others at Dolphins camp for the next couple of years. It's on fans' minds, of course. It's asked of newcomers Ted Ginn Jr., and John Beck, naturally. It was brought up by two veteran Dolphins I talked with.

It's such a topic that several upset readers from Cleveland e-mailed a story from the Plain Dealer about the minicamp excitement around Brady Quinn (News flash: He got a haircut!)

The question, of course: Did the Dolphins do the right thing on draft day?

For all the attention on Cameron getting booed by fans after the draft, there was an equally telling scene Thursday at the Dolphins' team banquet. At the end of a long speech, Cameron pulled out some bluster and said, "Together, we're going to bring us a championship. I promise you."

No one reacted too much. That's because no one's really listening too hard in the way everyone did to Johnson or Saban. Throw in Wannstedt, and they were all defensive coaches who acted like they had all the answers about offense.

This era goes the other way. Cameron's expertise is offense. He doesn't act like he has all the answers there. He just needs one answer at quarterback, though, and he's made the decision. It's Beck, not Brady. That's what this quieter era banks on.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/football/pro/dolphins/sfl-hyde06may06,0,3177151.column?coll=sfla-dolphins-front

Direckshun
05-13-2007, 11:46 PM
I didn't think Carl was totally to blame for this.

He is to blame for getting everything off on the wrong foot when he gave Green the power to seek a trade himself.

But Trent is to blame for torpedoing our negotiating leverage.

And the Dolphins are to blame for not budging on their original offer.

T-post Tom
05-14-2007, 12:05 AM
I didn't think Carl was totally to blame for this.

He is to blame for getting everything off on the wrong foot when he gave Green the power to seek a trade himself.

But Trent is to blame for torpedoing our negotiating leverage.

And the Dolphins are to blame for not budging on their original offer.

The way that I understand it, Green asked permission to seek a trade because he didn't want to restructure his deal or take a chance on not being the starter. Carl said okay because he genuinely likes Green and would like to get some value for Green if Green isn't going to be here.

Green chose Miami exclusively, and made it clear that he wouldn't go anywhere else or return to KC.

My question is: Did Green & his agent REALLY think that ANY offer that was made would be accepted?" Did they think that Carl was going to lay down and screw the franchise over by accepting a bad deal because Green said so? There's a difference between "See what kind of offer you can get and I'll look at it" VS "See what kind of offer you can get and I'll sign off on it."

Somehow, I suspect that Carl never promised to do anything more that seriously consider offers drummed up by Green & his agent. He may be arrogant and offensive to some, but Carl is not an idiot. He's going to do what's best for the team in his estimation. I guess that we'll never really know what was said.

Mojo Rising
05-14-2007, 12:14 AM
The one thing I haven't seen mentioned is that it is in Green's best interest to screw KC and help Miami.

Green would be better off if Miami has a higher draft choice so if they select a OL, WR, RB, etc. his chances of winning would be greater.

If he was the angel Fatlock made him out to be he would have allowed the Chiefs to play Miami vs. Cleveland and work out a deal.

I suspect Miami enlightened his agent who counseled Green to say he will only re-sign a lower priced deal with Miami. This would give Miami the cards in the poker game.

CP realized this and said FU. You can have Green on the final cut down day for nothing instead of the 7th rounder offered. How valuable is a 7th rounder really?

luv
05-14-2007, 12:19 AM
If he was the angel Fatlock made him out to be he would have allowed the Chiefs to play Miami vs. Cleveland and work out a deal.


How is it that a player can dictate what the team he plays for does/doesn't do?

Mojo Rising
05-14-2007, 12:49 AM
How is it that a player can dictate what the team he plays for does/doesn't do?

He announced that he would only renegotiate his contract for Miami. By saying this no other team would want to trade for him because they wouldn't want someone that wasn't interested in leading that team.

luv
05-14-2007, 12:51 AM
He announced that he would only renegotiate his contract for Miami. By saying this no other team would want to trade for him because they wouldn't want someone that wasn't interested in leading that team.
I see.

Smed1065
05-14-2007, 12:55 AM
Both very good points. Like most things, I feel it was good faith from both sides until Green locked down on one team only. We will never know exactly what transpired but I can not see CP saying do what you want and I will be ok with it.

Speaking of CP, was Chiefs Planet founded with the same initials as Carl for a reason?


:)

bigbucks24
05-14-2007, 09:29 AM
He announced that he would only renegotiate his contract for Miami. By saying this no other team would want to trade for him because they wouldn't want someone that wasn't interested in leading that team.
Not only would no other team want him because he doesn't want to be there, he has a very high salary for his age/condition/performance--$7.2 million. He will only renegotiate or lower that salary for the Dolphins. The Chiefs have the legal right to trade him to Cleveland. The biggest problem as I see it is that Cleveland would like Trent--just not at $7.2 million.

Everyone has dug in their heels here and are refusing to budge. Who has the advantage? Depends on who you listen to. Seems to me to be a lose-lose situation.

StcChief
05-14-2007, 10:32 AM
Doesn't seem like rocket science. Just hard nose play by Carl/Miami....

The closer to real training camp preseason the more likely for movement.

Now it's holding poker hands/faces.