PDA

View Full Version : Is there a doctor in the house?


Mr. Laz
05-30-2007, 04:50 PM
how can a doctor tell if a person has asthma?


is there a exact test for it or do patients just say "i have a hard time breathing" so the doctor gives them a diagnoses that fits their complaints?


wondering .... have a nephew diagnosed with asthma, but i have never seen him ever have any kind of breathing attack.


yet they have him taking stuff 3 times a day because he gets "out of breath" while playing soccer.

Phobia
05-30-2007, 04:57 PM
My wife has asthma and I've never seen her have any sort of breathing attack outside of the bedroom.

keg in kc
05-30-2007, 04:58 PM
My wife has asthma and I've never seen her have any sort of breathing attack outside of the bedroom.I've heard that laughter-induced asthma is a bitch.

Bill Parcells
05-30-2007, 05:03 PM
They have to go to a pulmonary doctor. they will give the kid a breathing test to test his lung power. if his lung power is ''high'' it's most likely asthma or allergies. if it's low it could be something else.

That's how I found out I had asthma.

Mr. Laz
05-30-2007, 06:26 PM
They have to go to a pulmonary doctor. they will give the kid a breathing test to test his lung power. if his lung power is ''high'' it's most likely asthma or allergies. if it's low it could be something else.

That's how I found out I had asthma.
so there isn't really a test, it's all circumstantial

:hmmm:

Joie
05-30-2007, 06:32 PM
Have you ever seen him cough uncontrollably? This can be a sign of asthma too. My mom has asthma and used to have horrible coughing attacks. They finally did a breathing test and sure enough, it's asthma. I strongly suggest his parents take him to a pulmonary specialist if they haven't already, there are many aspects of asthma that his primary physician may not be fully versed on.

cdcox
05-30-2007, 06:39 PM
Look here for actual steps of diagnosis.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/asthma/AS00003

Mr. Laz
05-30-2007, 06:39 PM
Have you ever seen him cough uncontrollably? This can be a sign of asthma too. My mom has asthma and used to have horrible coughing attacks. They finally did a breathing test and sure enough, it's asthma. I strongly suggest his parents take him to a pulmonary specialist if they haven't already, there are many aspects of asthma that his primary physician may not be fully versed on.
did these breathing test actually show asthma or just weak lungs?


no coughing attack
no unable to breath episodes


the only thing i know is

1. his father has asthma
2. he gets out of breath during sports etc (what they used to call being out of shape when i was growing up)

cdcox
05-30-2007, 06:43 PM
did these breathing test actually show asthma or just weak lungs?


no coughing attack
no unable to breath episodes


the only thing i know is

1. his father has asthma
2. he gets out of breath during sports etc (what they used to call being out of shape when i was growing up)

If its asthma, it won't get better as the kid gets in shape. In fact, getting out of breath could trigger a full blown asthma attack, in which the kid may not be able to catch his breath for several hours without receiving medical attention.

Phobia
05-30-2007, 06:44 PM
So the diagnosis doesn't fit within your agenda?

cdcox
05-30-2007, 06:45 PM
Plus, the breathing test they take at the doctors is done at rest. Also, the Dr. is likely to do home monitoring of the improvement in lung strength in response to asthma medicine. If lung strength improves when the kid is on the medicine, that's another confirmation of asthma.

Mr. Laz
05-30-2007, 06:50 PM
Plus, the breathing test they take at the doctors is done at rest. Also, the Dr. is likely to do home monitoring of the improvement in lung strength in response to asthma medicine. If lung strength improves when the kid is on the medicine, that's another confirmation of asthma.
doesn't the medicine dilate the bronchial tube etc?


wouldn't that make anyone's breathing stronger?

Bill Parcells
05-30-2007, 06:50 PM
Plus, the breathing test they take at the doctors is done at rest. Also, the Dr. is likely to do home monitoring of the improvement in lung strength in response to asthma medicine. If lung strength improves when the kid is on the medicine, that's another confirmation of asthma.
Exactly

They also give the breathing test a second time right after hitting on an inhaler full of asthma medicine.

Bill Parcells
05-30-2007, 06:51 PM
doesn't the medicine dilate the bronchial tube etc?


wouldn't that make anyone's breathing stronger?
It doesn't improve their lung capacity (strength), it just opens things up (breathing is easier).

Mr. Laz
05-30-2007, 06:57 PM
It doesn't improve their lung capacity (strength), it just opens things up (breathing is easier).
ok :hmmm:

so how do they know which is causing the problem ... narrow tubes or strength of the lungs?

Bill Parcells
05-30-2007, 07:01 PM
ok :hmmm:

so how do they know which is causing the problem ... narrow tubes or strength of the lungs?
They do this test with a computer, they put your age, weight and height in there. they will know what is normal or abnormal for his age, weight and height.

They made a mistake with me and were really concerned, until they realized they put down my height as 7 foot 9 :eek:

I'm '6 ft '2 :D

cdcox
05-30-2007, 07:04 PM
doesn't the medicine dilate the bronchial tube etc?


wouldn't that make anyone's breathing stronger?

I'm not a Dr, but no. Think of your water pipes. If they are scaled, you won't get enough water out of your shower. The pressure will be too low. Replacing these pipes with normal sized pipes will improve the pressure. But making the pipes in your house 10" in diameter isn't going to make huge pressures coming out your faucet.

Putting it another way, the amount of air you can blow is limited by your lungs and diaphram strength. In an asthmatic, the lungs and diaphram don't limit the amount of air they get, it is their bronchial tubes that limit the amount of air. Your bronchial tubes don't limit you at all, your lungs and so forth do. Dialating your bronchial tubes won't allow you to breath any better.

One more example. Think if you had to breath through a straw. The asthmatics straw is normally like a soda straw, you can breath, but it's a little limited. When they are having an attach it's like breathing through one of those coffee stirrers, that really isn't meant to be a straw at all. A healthy person is breathing through a 2" pipe. Maiking it a 6" pipe isn't going to allow you to breath better.

If he does better on asthma medicine, that's a very strong indicator of asthma.

Mr. Laz
05-30-2007, 07:33 PM
thanks for the info guys :)

Buehler445
05-30-2007, 08:18 PM
These guys have covered most of the major points, but the easiest diagnosis is if someone has an attack. Pretty much doesn't happen with anything else. Most of the time the "wheezing" most people have is different than being out of breath. It is not necessarily due to exercise either. I have allergy induced asthma, and unfortunately I am allergic to grass, so if I play football, it gives me fits, but I'm cool when I play basketball.

As far as your nephew goes, I would encourage him not to use his medicine too much if he doesn't need it. First it is ungodly expensive. Especially if you get the preventative stuff you have to take everyday. If it is situational and doesn't force attacks, it will save a button of money. Second, that inhaler they give him speeds up his heart a lot, and isn't very good for the ticker. Plus it will give him the shakes, which isn't any good for sports anyway.

Good luck. Asthma is poopy.

Silock
05-30-2007, 09:47 PM
Easiest way to diagnose is to go to a doctor and get a breathing capacity test done.

Logical
05-30-2007, 10:00 PM
doesn't the medicine dilate the bronchial tube etc?


wouldn't that make anyone's breathing stronger?

Yes it does, no it won't, in fact asthma medication can be dangerous for a healthy individual.

bringbackmarty
05-31-2007, 01:28 AM
It also is not something to minimize or **** around with. The kid could die if he doesn't get the right treatment.

I have Restrictive Airway disease it's a severe form of asthma. It's almost killed me more times than I can count. I've been in grave condition, intubated with my heart starting to enter cardiac arrest because my body had so little oxygen. I have had asthma for almost 30 years -
I know what I am talking about.

In an asthma attack. White blood cells flood lung tissue in what is really a heightened immune response to either foreign material in the lungs (animal dander, smoke, organic or chemical fumes, dust, pollen) or some other stimuli that provokes said immune response - (sudden change in air temperature, exercise, stress). This is caused by a particular type of blood cell called a mast cell. The mast cell thinks that the stimuli is harmful when it usually isn't. Therefore when the mast cell sends out his signal to the other w.b. cells the come running and inflame the persons bronchial tissue. this causes Bronchiospasm. Bronchiospasm is the physical symptom associated with asthma. The inflamed mucus filled tissue results in the persons airway being restricted - thereby restricting respiration and consequently the flow of oxygen to the persons bloodstream. Eventually if left untreated or if it doesn't stop on it's own bronchiospasm will result in death.

Asthma now days is typically treated with multiple medications. The medication your nephew is puffing on 3x a day is probably is an albuterol inhaler. It's called a Bronchiodilator. It has been the standard treatment for bronchiospasm for almost 30 years. It is related to epinepherine, or speed, or coffee. All the same shit really. It carries the same risk for healthy people as those with asthma which is low. There is a risk of the persons asthma getting worse with prolonged and excessive use. All drugs are bad when not taken according to directions. All drugs can make you dependent on them. Thats why they are called drugs. Prescription, otc, or street. You take enough for long enough, you will fool the body into thinking it needs it.

The second component in any asthma treatment regimen is an inhaled steroid. The steriod reduces inflammation in the lungs and helps to control the autoimmune reaction that causes the bronchiospasm in the first place. I'm on one called asmanex. It's the same thing as nasonex but for your lungs. In the past I've been on every inhaled steriod known to man. I could never hope to piss clean for roid. Although really the effects of the roids are limited to your lung tissue.
Roids also enhance the effect of Bronchiodilators. Kinda like putting octane booster in yer gas, or extasy in your coffee.

The third component is what they call a mast cell inhibitor. Singulair, Seldane, Cromalyn sodium inhalers
are all mast cell inhibitors. I already told you about the mast cells. These medications limit what mast cells react to by coating them with a chemical that acts like a pair of nipple covers on a girl during a cold snap.

Any trained medical doctor with a stethescope, or even a veteranarian can make a diagnosis of asthma. Weather it's a symptom of a more serious disease like Reactive airway disease, or COPD, or emphysema, or lung cancer, or a temporary side effect of something like a concussion, cold or infection, pnemonia, or purely psychosomatic will almost always take a visit to a special type of dr called a Pulmonologist.

A pulmonologist has ways of measuring a persons FEV
or forced expirational velocity - the force we breathe out. People experiencing an asthma attack can generally breathe air in to some degree, its getting the air out in a timely manner and getting the next breath in before the body starves of oxygen that is really the problem.

The pulmonologist can also measure peak expirational velocity the max speed of one's exhalations, and our lung capacity, and somebody was right about that. All of these measurements help the dr determine the type of lung disease and if the treatments prescribed are working.

You nephew has severe asthma, of this I have no doubt. He can control his symptoms with the right medications, lifestyle changes, and most important - learning what his triggers are and avoiding them as much as possible. If he gets under the care of a board certified pulmonologist, gets on the proper medicines he can run around all freaking day and even hump phils wife without so much as a wheeze.

If he doesn't do the right thing and get with a Pumonologist or asthma specialist, he could die.
Anybody can diagnose it, but not everyone can treat it.

It's all about aggressively treating the disease folks, and getting informed. I decided when I almost died in 1996 that I was going to really avoid my triggers, and when I could afford it - get on the right medicine. It's been tough with no insurance but it finally changed last year with the wife getting her first legal job. I haven't used my rescue inhaler for two weeks. I take Singulair, Nasonex, and Asmanex, and when I went in for a physical on tuesday with a new Primary care Dr.
I faked him out. He couldn't hear a wheeze and was surprised when I told him to write asthma in my chart.

Silock
05-31-2007, 04:16 AM
Yes it does, no it won't, in fact asthma medication can be dangerous for a healthy individual.

Hello, heart attack. Seriously.