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View Full Version : Anyone Here Familair With American Sign language?


WilliamTheIrish
07-02-2007, 10:09 PM
Do you use it as part of your work? Or do you have family member that is deaf or hearing impaired?

I've always had the desire - but not the time - to learn ASL. Last week I came into contact with several young folks who were deaf. They sat waiting because nobody was available to interpret for me. It took 30+ minutes to find an ASL interpreter. Last week, I went to a fundraiser for an infant girl. Shortly after birth, she contracted menningitis and though she recovered, was left severely hearing impaired. Her cochlear implants are expensive and it will be costly to send her to the school she will attend. Her mother will have to learn how to sign, but I didn't have a chance to ask her how she was going about the training.

After these experiences, I decided "Now is the time".

My question to you Planeteers that may have experience with ASL:

1) How did you learn? Classes? CD? Did you pick it up by being immersed in the language when living with a hearing impaired family member?

Anything advice you can give would be of benefit.

Thanks,

Will

FAX
07-02-2007, 10:13 PM
My son took a class so he could converse with a classmate in high school. If I remember correctly, the class was free and offered by a local, non-profit group supporting the deaf. Apparently, he became pretty fluent after just a few weeks.

I'm relatively certain that such a resource might be available in other areas, Mr. WilliamTheIrish.

FAX

Phobia
07-02-2007, 10:15 PM
We had a deaf family friend. I learned enough to be dangerous, similar to my Spanish skills. If you don't use it, you lose it.

WilliamTheIrish
07-02-2007, 10:38 PM
FAX,

it's the Planret. Smart ass answers are as welcome as serious answers.

*edit Planet. (planret?)

WilliamTheIrish
07-02-2007, 10:45 PM
I've googled some stuff related to ASL. But haven't found anything to my liking. Looking for a CD/DVD that can instruct me in basic ASL. There are hundreds of hits.

I'm actually enrolling at Maple Woods for thier basic ASL classes (101 and 102). Upon completion of those classes they conduct interviews with candidates interested in the degree portion of the class. Upon closer examination I've discovered it's a highly sought after set of skills.

It's an incredible field of work. Something I really want to be associated with.

SCChief
07-02-2007, 11:03 PM
I learned while I was working in an autistic class. Imagine that... being autistic AND hearing impaired. The child in question had a pretty rough time, but once I learned sign language I was much more capable of communicating with him.

I learned from another TA in the class, and she had been taught through a combination of classes through the local YMCA and her own hard work researching and incorporating sign language in her own time.

blueballs
07-02-2007, 11:07 PM
they can read lips
what's the point

blueballs
07-02-2007, 11:17 PM
if they want to live in this country
they damn well need to know the native tongue

FAX
07-02-2007, 11:20 PM
I just realized what it would be like to communicate with an auditory challenged Mr. blueballs.

It would be like signing with an amputee.

FAX

blueballs
07-02-2007, 11:23 PM
I don't drink ofter
maybe not often enough

Dunit35
07-03-2007, 12:00 AM
I've googled some stuff related to ASL. But haven't found anything to my liking. Looking for a CD/DVD that can instruct me in basic ASL. There are hundreds of hits.

I'm actually enrolling at Maple Woods for thier basic ASL classes (101 and 102). Upon completion of those classes they conduct interviews with candidates interested in the degree portion of the class. Upon closer examination I've discovered it's a highly sought after set of skills.

It's an incredible field of work. Something I really want to be associated with.


I was enrolled in the class last semester before having to get into spanish instead. The ASL class wouldn't transfer to my next college.

Logical
07-03-2007, 12:57 AM
I just realized what it would be like to communicate with an auditory challenged Mr. blueballs.

It would be like signing with an amputee.

FAXROFL

It is also like reading posts written by Mr. blueballs it takes an interpreter.

Bearcat
07-03-2007, 04:29 AM
I've googled some stuff related to ASL. But haven't found anything to my liking. Looking for a CD/DVD that can instruct me in basic ASL. There are hundreds of hits.

I'm actually enrolling at Maple Woods for thier basic ASL classes (101 and 102). Upon completion of those classes they conduct interviews with candidates interested in the degree portion of the class. Upon closer examination I've discovered it's a highly sought after set of skills.

It's an incredible field of work. Something I really want to be associated with.

Taking a class is the best thing, IMO... After learning the alphabet and some easy common signs, which only takes a day or two to memorize (and then several weeks of waiting for your fingers to catch up to your brain ;) ), I'd definitely recommend being immersed in the language.

At first, I thought I could pick it up by practicing on my own, but I really needed the interaction because of the way most books/DVDs are setup...

DVD's like this (http://www.amazon.com/American-Sign-Language-Learning-System/dp/B000F0UUZU/ref=pd_bbs_sr_7/105-6172802-4960455?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1183451648&sr=8-7) are helpful in order to practice and get more comfortable signing, but I didn't retain a lot of it because books and DVDs are seperated by category. It's useful to a point, because they teach you the similarities between signs for father, grandfather, etc. However, spending a day learning all the signs for everyone in the family is only helpful if you're turning around to talk to a deaf person about your family tree.

It's one thing to learn the individual signs, a completely new challenge to put them all together into sentences, and another to interpret someone else's signs.

I practiced on my own for speed and some memorization (even if it was just fingerspelling words that came across the screen while watching SportsCenter), but picked it up best when I was around deaf people in actual conversation. You'll also pick up lip reading and their speech, which is easier for me than interpreting the signs.

FAX
07-17-2007, 07:13 PM
Perhaps reconsideration is in order, Mr. WilliamTheIrish?

------------

Misunderstood Hand Signs Trigger Brawl

Jul 17, 6:01 PM (ET)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) - A brawl involving five men apparently began over a misunderstanding when a man who is deaf and mute was communicating through sign language and another man took offense, thinking that the hand gestures were disrespectful. Police say what resulted was a brawl in which a gun was fired Sunday outside a pizza store in east Anchorage.

Raymond Keith McWain, 26, had just turned a corner in his car when he noticed a truck with three men alongside his car. The deaf man was communicating with the other two in the truck through sign language, police said.

McWain thought the sign language gestures were some sort of slight or "disrespect" toward him, police said. He made some gestures of his own and honked and cut in front of the truck before pulling into the pizza store. The men in the truck followed.

In the parking lot, McWain and the three men from the truck began pushing and shoving, police said. McWain's cousin, Daniel Harris, 20, who works at the pizza store, came out and began beating the deaf man as the deaf man's companions pummeled McWain.

Multiple shots were fired from at least one gun.

Police are looking into whether Harris pistol-whipped the deaf man. A shot might have gone off then, police spokesman Paul Honeman said.

The men from the truck left the parking lot.

When police arrived they found McWain lying in the parking lot bleeding heavily from his head and upper body, Honeman said. At first police thought he'd been shot, but it turned out his injuries were from being beaten and kicked. McWain was taken to a local hospital where he was listed in fair condition.

The deaf man also went to a hospital later that night for treatment.

Police found Harris crying, crouched near the front counter inside the pizza store, court documents said.

The only man arrested was Harris, who was charged with possession of methamphetamine. When police searched Harris they found several plastic baggies of meth, a glass pipe and $4,691 in his pockets, court documents said.

Harris' bail was set at $15,000. According to a public database, he has no prior convictions in Alaska. The investigation into the fight and gunshots is ongoing.

http://apnews.myway.com/article/20070717/D8QEJP400.html

FAX

Bowser
07-17-2007, 07:19 PM
FAX,

it's the Planret. Smart ass answers are as welcome as serious answers.

*edit Planet. (planret?)

Since the floodgates are open.....

Skip Towne
07-17-2007, 07:35 PM
Since the floodgates are open.....
:LOL:

Coach
07-17-2007, 08:22 PM
Will,

I use it as my everday basis, since I was born at a borderline severe/profound hearing loss. My parents didn't know that I was born until I was like 2 and I was making some wierd noises, and I was not able to respond to any noise, as a normal child should.

As a result of that, I wore hearing aids and still do as of this moment. I never really learned sign language until my younger brother, who is also at the same level of hearing loss, but his speech is also impacted as well.

My brother went to Kansas School for the Deaf school here in Olathe, Kansas, and when he enrolled there, that's when I learned how to sign. It's the way we communicate to each other, as well the folks in the household.

My fiancee knows a little bit, since she was eager to learn how to do it, and that I know at some point in the future, hearing aids won't be the answer for me anymore (aging process, you know?)

I also use my sign language at work as well, since there are some eldery people that doesn't hear well and their method of communication is using sign language.

I learned sign language by taking several classes. Most colleges do offer sign language courses for people to take. You can also order some type of a book online at amazon.com

This is the book that I have from college.

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51B5T37W7AL._AA240_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/Learning-American-Sign-Language-Humphries/dp/0135285712

I also learned sign language from my brother who went to KSD. In Sign Language, facial expression including the raising or lowering of the eyebrows while signing, and body language are integral parts of communicating. These actions help give meaning to what is being signed, much like vocal tones and inflections give meaning to spoken words.

Here's a good site to learn a little bit of ASL.

http://www.masterstech-home.com/ASLDict.html

The trick is to be very good at it is that you have to install it as a daily basis of your life. Like every morning, we all get up to go take a shower, brush our teeth, comb our hair, get our clothes on, etc etc etc.

Hope that answers your questions, and if you have any more, feel free to send me a PM, or just ask away on this thread.

WilliamTheIrish
07-18-2007, 09:48 AM
Coach, thanks a bunch.

Bowser, that was hilarious.

Ari Chi3fs
07-18-2007, 10:02 AM
This will help out tremendously

http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/browser.htm

FAX
07-18-2007, 10:03 AM
Coach, thanks a bunch.

Bowser, that was hilarious.

Great.

Sure, those posters are funny and helpful and all, but I was the one who dredged this thread up when I learned by total accident and mysterious happenstance that signing can be dangerous around the wrong people and actually posted an article on the subject complete with a link in an effort to forestall any possible harm that might lie in store for you and then you acknowledge their contribution to the thread while at the same time completely ignoring those facts and what I did that was good and right and nice.

Makes you want to body slam a dog.

FAX

Skip Towne
07-18-2007, 10:04 AM
Coach, thanks a bunch.

Bowser, that was hilarious.
See there, you already knew some sign language and didn't realize it. You're off to a good start.

bkkcoh
07-18-2007, 10:11 AM
Coach, thanks a bunch.

Bowser, that was hilarious.

There is probably a Community College or community center that may have the ASL as an available class.

If you want to read it in a book, that is fine. Classes shoujld be available also.

bringbackmarty
07-18-2007, 10:42 AM
oh hell one more time....

Mile High Mania
07-18-2007, 11:13 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Profanity_in_ASL

Inspector
07-18-2007, 11:15 AM
My daughter-in-law is deaf. She reads lips...well, sort of. My wife has talked about going to sign class and taking her kids but then we found out she doesn't even know sign language.

I guess being deaf doesn't automatically mean you'll learn sign language.

Good luck.

WilliamTheIrish
07-18-2007, 12:00 PM
I'm already signed up for the Maple Woods CC basic class of ASL 101. Next semester 102.

Then I'll apply for the actual program where you do internships and such.

I'm pretty excited to get started.

Mile High Mania
07-18-2007, 12:05 PM
My daughter-in-law is deaf. She reads lips...well, sort of. My wife has talked about going to sign class and taking her kids but then we found out she doesn't even know sign language.

I guess being deaf doesn't automatically mean you'll learn sign language.

Good luck.

One of my good friends as a child was about 90% deaf. She could speak over the phone to a degree, but it was challenging. I believe she did sign, but if you were face to face, you could have a conversation.

However, she could read lips like a champ from across the room. It was amazing.

Coach
07-18-2007, 05:14 PM
My daughter-in-law is deaf. She reads lips...well, sort of. My wife has talked about going to sign class and taking her kids but then we found out she doesn't even know sign language.

I guess being deaf doesn't automatically mean you'll learn sign language.

Good luck.

And that's the unfortunate thing. People who are deaf, and won't associate with sign language, they wonder why they're struggling with certain tasks that requires communication.

Yeah, I know there's the paper and pen thing, but signing is a hell alot faster than just writing it on a paper back and forth to each other.