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Felch83
07-29-2007, 04:55 PM
Seriously, pot is the most harmless drug out there. It is much less harmful than alcohol yet it is illegal? Why? I know the government would have a hard time taxing it but they can figure that out just like any other plant that is grown in the ground.

Alcohol kills people yr after yr while pot cant kill you. I love alcohol too but weed gets such a bad rap. So just legalize it already!!!

Fishpicker
07-29-2007, 05:32 PM
let's legalize it just as soon as Rupert Murdoch is held accountable for the marijuana farm he had on his property.

Fishpicker
07-29-2007, 05:33 PM
your name and avatar are very fitting Felch83. ROFL

alnorth
07-29-2007, 05:37 PM
Speaking as the designated driver who never drinks or smokes anything, I have always believed that we should either ban alchohol and tobacco, or legalise Marijuana. Nothing else really makes sense.

kcfanintitanhell
07-29-2007, 05:39 PM
I watched a special last night on the trials and tribulations of people trying to get medical marijuana legalized, and the benefits it has had on people with various medical problems.
One doctor was saying that if pot had never been discovered, and someone walked out of the Amazon rain forest today with this herb, it would be hailed as a miracle drug.
Why are governments so terrified of this prospect?

CosmicPal
07-29-2007, 05:41 PM
Pot's problem is the ignorance and the stigma attached to it.

If a botanist walked into an Amazonian rain forest and came out with a newly discovered plant that serves medicinal properties- everyone would be clapping and embracing the new plant.

But, hemp's failure to be legal isn't so much about the plant's properties, but rather the shame that has been brought upon it.

Bowser
07-29-2007, 05:47 PM
I've been told marijuana is extremely addictive, and one of the harder drugs to kick.

CosmicPal
07-29-2007, 05:50 PM
I've been told marijuana is extremely addictive, and one of the harder drugs to kick.

You've been told wrong.

I started smoking pot and cigarettes at the same time. I stopped smoking pot a long time ago with no problems, but I'm still trying to kick the cigarette habit- even after several tries.

Fishpicker
07-29-2007, 05:50 PM
Pot's problem is the ignorance and the stigma attached to it.

If a botanist walked into an Amazonian rain forest and came out with a newly discovered plant that serves medicinal properties- everyone would be clapping and embracing the new plant.

But, hemp's failure to be legal isn't so much about the plant's properties, but rather the shame that has been brought upon it.

yep

weed was outlawed because of stuff like this...
<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/D44pyeEvhcQ"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/D44pyeEvhcQ" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

cab calloway - reefer man

Fishpicker
07-29-2007, 05:52 PM
I've been told marijuana is extremely addictive, and one of the harder drugs to kick.

it can be psychologically addictive (depending on addictive personalities) but it is not physically addictive.

Pitt Gorilla
07-29-2007, 06:10 PM
Speaking as the designated driver who never drinks or smokes anything, I have always believed that we should either ban alchohol and tobacco, or legalise Marijuana. Nothing else really makes sense.I agree 100% and have made that argument many times.

BigMeatballDave
07-29-2007, 06:16 PM
I've been told marijuana is extremely addictive, and one of the harder drugs to kick.Depends on the user, I guess. I was a regular user from '88 to '96. I have been high 3-4 times in the past 11 years. Haven't used any in nearly 5 yrs. I have never felt the 'need' to use it. I just enjoyed the euphoria. It is NOTHING like quitting tobacco.

BigMeatballDave
07-29-2007, 06:20 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fd/World-cannabis-laws.png

BigMeatballDave
07-29-2007, 06:25 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fd/World-cannabis-laws.pngThat says Ohio is decrimalized, but that is not true. I found this: http://www.ohiopatient.net/legal/ohiopotlaw.htm

Fishpicker
07-29-2007, 06:47 PM
well, pot can be decriminalized in states but the federal agencies will still enforce federal law. there were 10 or so medical marijuana facilities (in Cali) raided by DEA recently.

kcfanintitanhell
07-29-2007, 06:54 PM
well, pot can be decriminalized in states but the federal agencies will still enforce federal law. there were 10 or so medical marijuana facilities (in Cali) raided by DEA recently.

I have a hunch that if pot were legalized, a whole bunch of DEA stooges would be out of a job.

QuikSsurfer
07-29-2007, 07:19 PM
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=4516

Pitt Gorilla
07-29-2007, 11:27 PM
MJ was decriminalized in Columbia, MO, IIRC.

BigMeatballDave
07-30-2007, 12:13 AM
I have a hunch that if pot were legalized, a whole bunch of DEA stooges would be out of a job.Good. That would save some of our hard-earned tax dollars. Although, I'm sure our gov't would fine some other way to waste it...

SLAG
07-30-2007, 12:36 AM
That says Ohio is decrimalized, but that is not true. I found this: http://www.ohiopatient.net/legal/ohiopotlaw.htm


a $100 Ticket for Less than 100g - That is decriminialized not Legalized- if you read this from the web site:

Possession of less than 100 grams of marijuana is a citable offense only, with a fine of $100. No criminal record is created by such citation.

compared to KS

Possession (personal use)
Any amount (first offense) misdemeanor 1 year $2,500

BigMeatballDave
07-30-2007, 07:29 AM
a $100 Ticket for Less than 100g - That is decriminialized not Legalized- if you read this from the web site:



compared to KS

Possession (personal use)
Any amount (first offense) misdemeanor 1 year $2,500You're right, I really didn't pay much attention to that. They throw the book at you in Kansas. In 1990, I was living in Missouri, I was busted with a joint and recieved a $100 fine and a 15 day jail sentence, which was suspended, plus 2 yrs unsupervised probation.

Dallas Chief
07-30-2007, 10:53 AM
We should legalize it, regulate it, and tax the hell out of it, just like booze. I don't partake and haven't for many many years but it only makes sense. There has to be some study that outlines the economic impact that MJ would have. I am just too lazy to research it. We could be the world leader in production. The tax revenues could go towards any number of things. Bolster social security, whatever? Any thoughts?

CosmicPal
07-30-2007, 11:03 AM
We should legalize it, regulate it, and tax the hell out of it, just like booze...There has to be some study that outlines the economic impact that MJ would have.

The saddest thing of all, is that the hemp plant itself is banned. There are over a hundred different varieties of hemp, and only one is illegal because of its THC level.

Hemp only takes four months to mature. What this means, is that a farmer can have 3 yields in a single year! Unlike wheat and corn, which are both annuals.

Hemp can be made into just about anything: food, clothing, cosmetics, and a million other materials.

That's the undeniable sadness in all of this- the fact that the plant presents so much promise and economic vitality, and yet, it's considered evil.

Radar Chief
07-30-2007, 11:03 AM
We should legalize it, regulate it, and tax the hell out of it, just like booze. I don't partake and haven't for many many years but it only makes sense. There has to be some study that outlines the economic impact that MJ would have. I am just too lazy to research it. We could be the world leader in production. The tax revenues could go towards any number of things. Bolster social security, whatever? Any thoughts?

That’s part of the problem. How do you “regulate and tax the hell out of” something that just about anybody can grow themselves?

Dallas Chief
07-30-2007, 11:08 AM
That’s part of the problem. How do you “regulate and tax the hell out of” something that just about anybody can grow themselves? Other than using the same model as tobacco or booze I don't know...

Radar Chief
07-30-2007, 11:12 AM
Other than using the same model as tobacco or booze I don't know...

I don’t know much about tobacco, but can a person living in an apartment grow a tobacco plant in an average sized pot and come up with enough to smoke? Seriously, I don’t know.

CosmicPal
07-30-2007, 11:16 AM
That’s part of the problem. How do you “regulate and tax the hell out of” something that just about anybody can grow themselves?

That's not the problem...you will still have a black market for the product. The fact of the matter is, the government will still make a killing with the taxes regardless if people are still growing it.

You simply make it illegal to grow and sell the weed without a license- just like you need a liquor license to sell booze.

Cochise
07-30-2007, 11:16 AM
I think we have a good situation already. It's easy to find and anybody who's not a tard can use it all they want and not get in trouble. But it's also not available in every gas station and grocery store and not acceptable in public places so the overall usage isn't so pervasive.

banyon
07-30-2007, 11:18 AM
This would free up a tremendous amount of prison space also and save $ there.

kcfanintitanhell
07-30-2007, 11:27 AM
This would free up a tremendous amount of prison space also and save $ there.

As I mentioned in a previous post regarding how many DEA employees would be looking for work...add employees of the prison system.
I wonder how many people in this country make a living, directly or indirectly, from the enforcement of marijuana laws?

CosmicPal
07-30-2007, 11:33 AM
I wonder how many people in this country make a living, directly or indirectly, from the enforcement of marijuana laws?

Quite a few actually. You also have to take into consideration that those incarcerated are no longer doing license plates. They are telemarketers, customer service agents, etc. Most of those imprisoned are there for non-violent crimes, and these are the peeps who are making the prison system function as an economic entity.

Cochise
07-30-2007, 11:55 AM
As I mentioned in a previous post regarding how many DEA employees would be looking for work...add employees of the prison system.
I wonder how many people in this country make a living, directly or indirectly, from the enforcement of marijuana laws?

What about the millions of small-time dope dealers who would get put out of business?

Wait until RJR gets in the bud business, selling their mass produced stuff already rolled and at lower prices than ever before seen. It will be like Wal-Mart coming to a town full of mom & pop operations.

Something tells me that your average drug peddler isn't going to decide to go to college and become a doctor or a school teacher if his dope business dries up, either. There would be a lot of social upheaval in a lot of ways that people don't think about.

Dallas Chief
07-30-2007, 04:30 PM
What about the millions of small-time dope dealers who would get put out of business?

Wait until RJR gets in the bud business, selling their mass produced stuff already rolled and at lower prices than ever before seen. It will be like Wal-Mart coming to a town full of mom & pop operations.

Something tells me that your average drug peddler isn't going to decide to go to college and become a doctor or a school teacher if his dope business dries up, either. There would be a lot of social upheaval in a lot of ways that people don't think about.
Would it cause any more social upheaval than busting folks for it and putting them in the pokey? Dealers could always get a job working in the spliff plant...

The only way to really regulate it, IMHO, is to treat it exactly like booze. I mean even all the way down to operating motor vehicles, etc. And you treat it like cigarettes, too. You can only smoke in designated areas, etc...

Dallas Chief
07-30-2007, 04:37 PM
I don’t know much about tobacco, but can a person living in an apartment grow a tobacco plant in an average sized pot and come up with enough to smoke? Seriously, I don’t know.
I don't know either. I guess if someone wanted to grow their own stuff bad enough they will find a way. I know it's not as easy as it sounds to legalize it and I don't advocate it's use. But I would rather capitalize on it than just let it continue to go on unchecked, like it is now.

Taco John
07-30-2007, 04:49 PM
Personally, I don't see why this is a federal issue. I think if a state wants to make MJ illegal, it's their right to. Likewise, if a state wants to make it completely legal, they should be allowed to.

The federal government shouldn't have any jurisdiction in this matter.

Nightwish
07-30-2007, 05:28 PM
Seriously, pot is the most harmless drug out there. It is much less harmful than alcohol yet it is illegal? Why? I know the government would have a hard time taxing it but they can figure that out just like any other plant that is grown in the ground.

Alcohol kills people yr after yr while pot cant kill you. I love alcohol too but weed gets such a bad rap. So just legalize it already!!!I've always heard (don't know if it's true or not) that the main reason it was criminalized in the first place was not due to honest fears about harmful effects, but because the alcohol and tobacco industries lobbied hard and brought their massive resources to bear in the legislature, due to the significant threat pot poses to their profits.

In my opinion, the greatest danger pot currently poses, and perhaps one of the best reasons it should be legalized, is its status as a gateway drug. Take it out of the hands of the street dealers, so that those actively seeking to acquire pot can get it from vendors that won't try to turn them onto harder stuff, close the gate. Look at Amsterdam - pot is legal and easily obtained, as are shrooms, but hard drugs are illegal ... and it has one of the lowest rates of hard drug use and addiction in the world.

noa
07-30-2007, 05:34 PM
I've always heard (don't know if it's true or not) that the main reason it was criminalized in the first place was not due to honest fears about harmful effects, but because the alcohol and tobacco industries lobbied hard and brought their massive resources to bear in the legislature, due to the significant threat pot poses to their profits.

It also had to do with fears of minorities. William Randolph Hearst was a big force behind the prohibition of marijuana, and he developed a hatred for Mexicans after losing a lot of land to Poncho Villa. After that, many negative portrayals of Mexicans and their devil weed showed up in newspapers and found their way into Congressional testimony.

Nightwish
07-30-2007, 05:48 PM
It also had to do with fears of minorities. William Randolph Hearst was a big force behind the prohibition of marijuana, and he developed a hatred for Mexicans after losing a lot of land to Poncho Villa. After that, many negative portrayals of Mexicans and their devil weed showed up in newspapers and found their way into Congressional testimony.Those damnable Mexicans, with all their demon plants that cause euphoria ... and heartburn ... and flatulence ... and diarrhea ... and fire breath ... and great taste ... and meat, spicy goodness ... and ... I gotta go make a food run!

Fishpicker
07-30-2007, 05:59 PM
It also had to do with fears of minorities. William Randolph Hearst was a big force behind the prohibition of marijuana, and he developed a hatred for Mexicans after losing a lot of land to Poncho Villa. After that, many negative portrayals of Mexicans and their devil weed showed up in newspapers and found their way into Congressional testimony.

Hearst publications has done a great job in preserving the tradition of Yellow jounalism. A century later, Pulitzer is the name of the prize for distinguished journalists.

Hydrae
07-30-2007, 07:32 PM
It also had to do with fears of minorities. William Randolph Hearst was a big force behind the prohibition of marijuana, and he developed a hatred for Mexicans after losing a lot of land to Poncho Villa. After that, many negative portrayals of Mexicans and their devil weed showed up in newspapers and found their way into Congressional testimony.


I had never heard that about Mexicans before. I know they used blacks in demonizing it. After all, it leads to things like jazz playing! :eek:

The way I have always heard it though was a combination of Hearst and Dow. Hearst has many, many acres of prime tree covered land that he wanted to use for paper production. About the same time a process had been invented to convert hemp into paper. Rather than allow that to become the new basis for paper, he went to town in getting rid of this competition.

As to why Dow would be involved, it has to do with nylon rope. Until that time hemp ropes were the standard of course. By helping kill hemp, nylon became the rope material of choice.

Both of these of course smack largely of conspiracy theories. Whether Hearst and Dow really were doing this to limit the marketplace for themselves or not, Aslinger was the man who pushed it all through. Who he answered to might be the best place to start though.

BigMeatballDave
07-30-2007, 08:07 PM
The saddest thing of all, is that the hemp plant itself is banned. There are over a hundred different varieties of hemp, and only one is illegal because of its THC level.

Hemp only takes four months to mature. What this means, is that a farmer can have 3 yields in a single year! Unlike wheat and corn, which are both annuals.

Hemp can be made into just about anything: food, clothing, cosmetics, and a million other materials.

That's the undeniable sadness in all of this- the fact that the plant presents so much promise and economic vitality, and yet, it's considered evil.
:shake: Our government is pathetic...

Logical
08-02-2007, 01:45 AM
Pot is the boogeyman the Republican right thrives on.

Saggysack
08-02-2007, 04:34 AM
Look at Amsterdam - pot is legal and easily obtained, as are shrooms, but hard drugs are illegal ... and it has one of the lowest rates of hard drug use and addiction in the world.

No, it isn't legal in Amsterdam, or anywhere in the the Netherlands for that matter.

Radar Chief
08-02-2007, 07:56 AM
No, it isn't legal in Amsterdam, or anywhere in the the Netherlands for that matter.

Well, if it isn’t legal they sure turn a blind eye to it.

Radar Chief
08-02-2007, 08:05 AM
Look at Amsterdam - pot is legal and easily obtained, as are shrooms, but hard drugs are illegal ... and it has one of the lowest rates of hard drug use and addiction in the world.

Got anything to back that up?
When I was in Germany several of the Germans I spoke to about it said that after it was legalized (as far as I know it is legal there Saggy), their crime rate soared. The way they described it mostly it was just petty theft, breaking into cars for the stereo, that kind of thing.
Also, I’ve seen several documentaries focusing on heroin use in Amsterdam, and at least they made it look like a serious issue.
Not saying you’re wrong, just if you know some easy key words to search for, I’d like to read that kind of information for myself.

Dr. Facebook Fever
08-02-2007, 08:58 AM
I've been told marijuana is extremely addictive, and one of the harder drugs to kick.
Believe me if that were true I'd..................... wait....... forget it........

Saggysack
08-02-2007, 11:09 AM
Well, if it isn’t legal they sure turn a blind eye to it.

They aren't enforced on the consumer and licensed cafes. There are laws in the Netherlands still against the distribution, manufacture and possession of marijuana.

I would eleborate, but it would take days going through it all. It's a common mistake made by most Americans that think cannabis and other soft drugs are legal there, they aren't.

Saggysack
08-02-2007, 11:16 AM
Got anything to back that up?
When I was in Germany several of the Germans I spoke to about it said that after it was legalized (as far as I know it is legal there Saggy), their crime rate soared. The way they described it mostly it was just petty theft, breaking into cars for the stereo, that kind of thing.
Also, I’ve seen several documentaries focusing on heroin use in Amsterdam, and at least they made it look like a serious issue.
Not saying you’re wrong, just if you know some easy key words to search for, I’d like to read that kind of information for myself.

Sorry, RC, you're wrong. It's not legal.

Amsterdam would surprise a whole hellava lot of people around here. It isn't as crazy as people think it is. TBH, I don't feel more American(besides the U.S.) anywhere else in the world than I do Amsterdam. Biggest thing you have to worry about in AMS is a pickpocket, and that is all because it is a tourist town.

Baby Lee
08-02-2007, 11:32 AM
Pot is the boogeyman the Republican right thrives on.
Yeah, all those Republicans flocking to the polls to elect candidates who make the Pot issue the center of their campaign. Who're those candidates again?

Radar Chief
08-02-2007, 11:33 AM
Sorry, RC, you're wrong. It's not legal.

Amsterdam would surprise a whole hellava lot of people around here. It isn't as crazy as people think it is. TBH, I don't feel more American(besides the U.S.) anywhere else in the world than I do Amsterdam. Biggest thing you have to worry about in AMS is a pickpocket, and that is all because it is a tourist town.

Sounds like you’ve been there. I’ll take your word for it.
Maybe it was just “decriminalized” not legalized. :shrug:

Baby Lee
08-02-2007, 11:34 AM
No, it isn't legal in Amsterdam, or anywhere in the the Netherlands for that matter.
it's legal to buy it, it's legal to own it, and, if you're the proprietor of a hash bar, it's legal to sell it. It's legal to carry it, but that doesn't really matter 'cause - get a load of this - if you get stopped by the cops in amsterdam, it's illegal for them to search you. I mean, that's a right the cops in amsterdam don't have.

noa
08-02-2007, 11:35 AM
it's legal to buy it, it's legal to own it, and, if you're the proprietor of a hash bar, it's legal to sell it. It's legal to carry it, but that doesn't really matter 'cause - get a load of this - if you get stopped by the cops in amsterdam, it's illegal for them to search you. I mean, that's a right the cops in amsterdam don't have.

What do they call a Big Mac?

Saggysack
08-02-2007, 06:07 PM
Sounds like you’ve been there. I’ll take your word for it.
Maybe it was just “decriminalized” not legalized. :shrug:

Heh, not even decriminalized. There are plenty of people in the Netherlands penal system on marijuana related charges.

The difference in distinction they make it about is, priority. Is it a priority to spend thousands of dollars on the arrest and conviction of those who want nothing more to buy a $20 sack in peace... not in the Netherlands. Like I said earlier, the laws for the consumer and licensed, tax paying cafes just aren't enforced.

It really is a quite a genius concept. I mean, how many countries out there make more tax money off soft drugs that have been neither legalized or decriminalized. And the tourist money it brings in. It is a huge cash cow.

But even the Netherlands has it's limits. A few years ago, you could find over 700 cannabis cafes, now there are around 300. There have been crack downs recently as well. In the coming future, there will have to be a set amount of distance between schools/daycares/etc. and cafes. Which I wholeheartedly agree with. And smoking will not be allowed inside a cafe the coming future for fear of the second hand smoke, yet it is frowned upon and will be dealt with swiftly to anyone who thinks they can smoke anywhere they want outside.

Saggysack
08-02-2007, 06:13 PM
What do they call a Big Mac?

They don't have a Big Mac/Royale w/cheese. If you go to the Netherlands and hit up McDonalds, you should be deported. If you want fast food, FEBO is where it is at. Nothing more than pure Dutch
delicacies... lol

Personally, I like Frites with mayo on the go.

Nightwish
08-02-2007, 07:09 PM
Got anything to back that up?
When I was in Germany several of the Germans I spoke to about it said that after it was legalized (as far as I know it is legal there Saggy), their crime rate soared. The way they described it mostly it was just petty theft, breaking into cars for the stereo, that kind of thing.
Also, I’ve seen several documentaries focusing on heroin use in Amsterdam, and at least they made it look like a serious issue.
Not saying you’re wrong, just if you know some easy key words to search for, I’d like to read that kind of information for myself.Well, I did some research, and I should know by now not to believe something just because it's a common urban myth. Saggysack is right, it hasn't been legalized, and in terms of legislation, hasn't officially been decriminalized, although there are official policies within the courts and law enforcement with regard to the conditions that must be met before the misdemeanor possession or distribution of marijuana and other "soft drugs" will be prosecuted and enforced. So, in essence, small amounts have been decriminalized, for all intents and purposes, though this trend may change, as the policy has come under challenge lately because of the introduction of higher levels of THC in the marijuana that is making its way into the Netherlands.

As far as addiction rates go, I did find some numbers (linked one report below), and the Netherlands is below other European nations in terms of hard drug usage and addiction, and way below the United States. Heroin addiction, which you specifically mentioned, is almost four times more prevalent in America, and significantly higher throughout the rest of Europe (especially Germany and France, according to some sources I came across) than it is in the Netherlands. Surprisingly, despite the open policy toward marijuana use in the Netherlands, and particularly Amsterdam, they are still well below Europe and the United States in marijuana use, and the numbers of young users (below age 25) have dropped dramatically.

I think they are taking the right approach by splitting the market, as it were, which in turn frees up a lot more resources to combat and treat hard drug abuse.

http://www.drugwarfacts.org/thenethe.htm

At any rate, I think the point that the practice of essentially giving the green light to "legitimate" vendors to sell marijuana does close the gateway. Here in the US, little Johnny Smith, who only wants to buy a joint, has to go to the street corner pusher to get it, and Mr. Street Corner is likely going to try to turn him onto harder stuff (because that's where the real money is). Legitimizing the sale/distribution of pot through "approved" avenues would reduce that signifantly, in my opinion.

mlyonsd
08-02-2007, 07:51 PM
Without reading the entire thread I think doing a doobie is the same as drinking.

The same laws as drinking should apply.

Nightwish
08-02-2007, 07:56 PM
Without reading the entire thread I think doing a doobie is the same as drinking.

The same laws as drinking should apply.Doing a doobie? Heh, even if I was gay or female, I wouldn't consider doing a Doobie! Do you have any idea how old and wrinkled those guys are now?

mlyonsd
08-02-2007, 07:59 PM
Doing a doobie? Heh, even if I was gay or female, I wouldn't consider doing a Doobie! Do you have any idea how old and wrinkled those guys are now?

You bastard. I might not know how to correctly spell it but my intent is the same. ROFL:)

Nightwish
08-02-2007, 08:07 PM
You bastard. I might not know how to correctly spell it but my intent is the same. ROFL:)
Oh, I'm pretty sure you spelled it correctly. As a matter of fact, I think that's the reason the band chose the name!

Now, enough of this talk, I wanna hear some funk and dixieland ...

Adept Havelock
08-02-2007, 08:19 PM
You know, Music is the Doctor...

Saggysack
08-03-2007, 02:27 AM
Well, I did some research, and I should know by now not to believe something just because it's a common urban myth. Saggysack is right, it hasn't been legalized, and in terms of legislation, hasn't officially been decriminalized, although there are official policies within the courts and law enforcement with regard to the conditions that must be met before the misdemeanor possession or distribution of marijuana and other "soft drugs" will be prosecuted and enforced. So, in essence, small amounts have been decriminalized, for all intents and purposes, though this trend may change, as the policy has come under challenge lately because of the introduction of higher levels of THC in the marijuana that is making its way into the Netherlands.

It already has changed. 5g is the unenforced limit of possession for the consumer. 5g is the maximum a cafe can sell a consumer. A licensed cafe is allowed 500g on site. Caught with anything more than that, expect judicial punishment for the consumer and the license taken away from the owner. I remember when 30g was the maximum allowable limit of possession. Not anymore.

I like the part about, "making it's way into the Netherlands". I'd say 90% of the marijuana sold is grown in the Netherlands. The solids are different. I'd say about 30% of that comes from within the country.
Having said that, it doesn't really matter about strength of the product anyway. I'll let everyone in on a secret that many people don't know about that trade. The buds are shaken. Meaning, a large part of the THC is shaken off the buds. Then the shaken crystals are used to make solids. the consumer definatetly isn't getting the full strength of the product.

Which brings me to my whole point of even posting in this thread. It neither needs to be legalized or decriminalized to properly take advantage of it's monetary gain and proper enforcement in our society. It only needs to be tolerated at certain levels.

Radar Chief
08-03-2007, 08:14 AM
:hmmm: That’s good information guys, thanks. :thumb:

Sully
08-03-2007, 01:14 PM
Doing a doobie? Heh, even if I was gay or female, I wouldn't consider doing a Doobie! Do you have any idea how old and wrinkled those guys are now?
I gotta tell you something. I'm really excited about it. Uh, for the first time, today, I woke up, I came to the store, and I - I feel confident to say to you that if you don't take this Michael McDonald DVD - that you've been playing for two years straight - off, I'm going to kill everyone in the store and put a bullet in my brain!
I don't care. Anything! I would rather - I would rather watch "Beautician And The Beast". I would rather listen to Fran Drescher for eight hours than have to listen to Michael McDonald. Nothin' against him, but if I hear "Yah Mo B There" one more time, "Yah Mo" burn this place to the ground.

go bowe
08-03-2007, 02:02 PM
let's legalize it just as soon as Rupert Murdoch is held accountable for the marijuana farm he had on his property.you mean roop had a plot of pot on his property?

having fighting dogs on his property, otoh, could cause him to lose his career...

well, not really since roop already owns half the world, he doesn't need a career...

Fishpicker
08-03-2007, 02:22 PM
you mean roop had a plot of pot on his property?

having fighting dogs on his property, otoh, could cause him to lose his career...

well, not really since roop already owns half the world, he doesn't need a career...

of course a local FOX (http://www.kcba.com/news/local/story.aspx?content_id=ff6832af-72d4-49d6-a31d-360bcc5fe9b9&rss=180) affiliate is the only media agency to mention this
7/13/07

Monterey Sheriff’s Deputies pulled-up thousands of pot plants from a ranch in Carmel Valley owned by media mogul Rupert Murdoch. Nearly thirty four hundred plants were found in two gardens along the banks of a creek. The remote property is part of a ranch belonging to Murdoch who owns the FOX Network and My-Space-Dot-Com among other things.

Deputies say Murdoch’s employees stumbled upon the illegal gardens and called authorities.

Detectives say a man had been illegally camping on the property to grow the dope. He got away before he could be arrested.
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planting, growing, & cultivating 3,400 pots plants is not a 1 man operation. (the insurgent had to do this surreptitiously too) it's funny that a news station could be led to believe so.

A forest of pot like that can be smelled 2 miles away. the smell can travel 6 miles or more with the right wind.

go bowe
08-03-2007, 02:26 PM
You bastard. I might not know how to correctly spell it but my intent is the same. ROFL:)intent?

correcting spelling?

no, man, say it ain't so...

otoh, you can spell it any way you want...

or use any one of a dozen pseudonyms for it...

just make sure you remember the basic rule...

"puff puff pass"... :bong: PBJ PBJ PBJ

Nightwish
08-03-2007, 08:20 PM
I gotta tell you something. I'm really excited about it. Uh, for the first time, today, I woke up, I came to the store, and I - I feel confident to say to you that if you don't take this Michael McDonald DVD - that you've been playing for two years straight - off, I'm going to kill everyone in the store and put a bullet in my brain!
I don't care. Anything! I would rather - I would rather watch "Beautician And The Beast". I would rather listen to Fran Drescher for eight hours than have to listen to Michael McDonald. Nothin' against him, but if I hear "Yah Mo B There" one more time, "Yah Mo" burn this place to the ground.
ROFL

CHIEF4EVER
08-03-2007, 08:58 PM
My brother got 10 years for posession of MJ. His life is ruined because he is a felon. Granted, he is an effing bonehead but still.....

What is the worst thing a stoner will do? Eat too much? I know that crackheads will rob people and commit burglary but when is the last time one of us have heard of a pothead robbing a pizza parlor at gunpoint to support his habit?

Pothead brandishing shotgun: "Hands up! Give me the pie NOW! NOW DAMMIT! TO GO! ONLY 4 SLICES MOTHERF****ER!"