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Stewie
10-02-2007, 02:18 PM
A quick synopsis.

Plasma provides a better overall HDTV experience and is cheaper than a similar sized LCD. The Panasonic 50" plasma 1080p is the best picture ever reviewed. Viewing angle is still an issue with LCDs. 1080p vs. 720p isn't really a factor if your TV is less than 50".

I'll only show the Top 3 and Bottom 3 in each category. I'm a lazy typer.
____________________________________________________
Highest Rated LCDs 46-52"

Samsung LN-T4661F - $2500
Sony Bravia KDL-46S3000 - $1800 (CR Best Buy)
LG 47LB5D - $2600

Lowest Rated LCDs 46-52"

Vizio Gallevia GV47LV - $1700
Westinghouse TX-47F430S - $1600
HP LC4776N - $2000
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Highest Rated LCDs 40-42"

Samsung LN-T4053H - $1600
Samsung LN-T4061F - $1700
Sony Bravia KDL-40S3000 - $1500
Honorable Mention because it's a CR Best Buy:
Toshiba Regza 42HL67 - $1150

Lowest Rated LCDs 40-42"

Olevia 542i - $1100
JVC LT-42E488 - $1500
HP LC4276 - $1500
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Plasma TVs 50" and larger (Rank Best to Worst)

Panasonic TH-50PZ700U - $2900 (best HDTV ever tested)
Panasonic TH-50PX75U - $1700
Samsung HP-T5064 - $1600
Pioneer PDP-5080HD - $1900
LG 50PC5D - $1900
Vizio P50HDTV - $1500
Vizio Maximvs VM60P HDTV10A - $2500 (60")
Hitachi P50H401 - $1600
Philips 50PFP5332D - $1800
LG 60PC1D - $3600
HP PL5072N - $1800
Magnavox 50MF231D/37
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Highest Rated Plasmas 42" (Only tested 7 so listed all of them)

Panasonic TH-42PX77U - $1200
LG 42PC50 - $1300
Samsung HP-T4264 - $1200
Philips 42PFP5332D -$1200
Hitachi 42HDX99 - $1700
HP PL4272N - $1200
Hitachi - P42T501
_____________________________________________________

Hope this helps anyone looking into HDTVs.

'Hamas' Jenkins
10-02-2007, 02:22 PM
I wonder how much people will love those 1080p plasmas in three years when they've lost 30 percent of their original brightness and there's nothing they can do to fix it.

Stewie
10-02-2007, 02:24 PM
I wonder how much people will love those 1080p plasmas in three years when they've lost 30 percent of their original brightness and there's nothing they can do to fix it.

We have a plasma in the lobby where I work. It's run at least 10 hours/day and five days a week. Installed in 2003 or there abouts and still looks great.

'Hamas' Jenkins
10-02-2007, 02:30 PM
We have a plasma in the lobby where I work. It's run at least 10 hours/day and five days a week. Installed in 2003 or there abouts and still looks great.

We've had this discussion before. Put it up against a new TV and see how much the thing has dimmed and you'll shit yourself.

People always think that their TV is better than what it is because they aren't comparing it against anything else.

Sure-Oz
10-02-2007, 03:05 PM
I love my sharp aquos

Sure-Oz
10-02-2007, 03:05 PM
We've had this discussion before. Put it up against a new TV and see how much the thing has dimmed and you'll shit yourself.

People always think that their TV is better than what it is because they aren't comparing it against anything else.
I like our Aquos lcd, whats the difference between that and a plasma?

'Hamas' Jenkins
10-02-2007, 03:12 PM
I like our Aquos lcd, whats the difference between that and a plasma?

LCDs are easier to make in higher resolution and have better refresh rates. They are also better in brighter rooms.

Plasmas are generally cheaper for screen size, but their brightness and PQ degrades over time, whereas with LCDs you can replace the light source.


An LCD is two screens sandwiching a conductive gel. Plasmas have individual gas pixels.

Because of physics, gases want to move from a high pressure area to a low pressure area (think compressed air). Therefore, your gas-filled pixels are constantly trying to escape.

LCDs have problems with dead pixels as well, but it's often at the factory level, and if you notice it, you can swap out your TV in the standard 30 day return policy via most retailers.

Plasmas tend to suffer a slower pixel discharge and death, so by the time that their flaws surface, you're SOL.

But if you have a limited budget and not much space, a plasma can work for you.

chagrin
10-02-2007, 03:23 PM
no surprise, vizio is at the bottom of the barrel

Boon
10-02-2007, 03:30 PM
I have a Sony SXRD. Had it a year now. Love it.

'Hamas' Jenkins
10-02-2007, 03:33 PM
I have a Sony SXRD. Had it a year now. Love it.

That's an LCoS TV...different type.

Personally, I really detest most Sony products, but if I was going to buy a new TV, I'd buy the KDS A3000 SXRD. It's that good.

Stewie
10-02-2007, 03:50 PM
Hamas Jenkins, the king of misinformation.

Boon
10-02-2007, 04:00 PM
That's an LCoS TV...different type.

Personally, I really detest most Sony products, but if I was going to buy a new TV, I'd buy the KDS A3000 SXRD. It's that good.


Yup, it's a rear projection, but looks great.

chasedude
10-02-2007, 04:02 PM
no surprise, vizio is at the bottom of the barrel


Heh... That's Wally World's big seller ROFL

'Hamas' Jenkins
10-02-2007, 04:30 PM
Hamas Jenkins, the king of misinformation.

Care to actually dispute any of that, or are you just a plasma fanboy?

dirk digler
10-02-2007, 04:51 PM
My ancient big screen TV is starting to wear out and I may have to buy a nice new TV so I am generally interested in plasma. Here is what they say about plasma and it's life.


http://www.whatabouttvs.com/How_Long_Does_a_Plasma_TV_Last_for.html

How Long Does a Plasma TV Last for
Do These Televisions Actually Lose Brightness?

When we purchase electronic items, especially a television, we all want to know how long would it last. Therefore, not surprisingly, when we buy an expensive Plasma TV our first question would be how long does a Plasma TV Last for. How Long Does a Plasma TV Last for

Information on the lifespan of a Plasma TV most often confuses and at times frustrates the consumer. The Plasma TV is an excellent investment if you want to enjoy high quality images on the screen which are pleasing to the eyes. But the question that needs to be answered is will this big, life like image displaying Plasma TV go dark in a few years? Most of the information by merchants who sell the conventional CRT TVs will not be so pleasing about the Plasma TV. This information is nothing but motivated by self interests. What you will hear from a conventional TV seller is that a Plasma TV would last up to 3 or 4 years. There are some sellers who use another gimmick. They will tell you that a “Plasma TV lasts only about 3 or 4 years, but if you buy our 5-year warranty, we’ll replace it with a new one if it fails.” The story, even repeated by certain review writers, will tell you that the life span of a Plasma TV is 3 years. These are based on vested interests. This is nothing but a myth in short.

A Plasma TV loses brightness slowly as much as a CRT TV does. This is not visible to the human eye. This loss takes place over a very long period of time. A normal Plasma TV lasts 60,000 hours. By the time you complete 30,000 hours your Plasma TV’s brightness would have reduced by half. The technical term for this phosphor-brightness inclination is “Life to Half Brightness” or LTHB. It is not the same as “lifespan” or “half-life.” If you watch TV for 8 hours a day, 30,000 hours would mean you have watched the TV for 3,750 days or well over 10 years! By the time your Plasma TV does totally black, it will take over 20 years of viewing! Does this sound bad? Not, at all. If a TV lasts 10 years, it’s good enough.

Gone are the days when the whole family sat directly in front of the TV set. Today the viewing angle is a very important consideration. Most people want to have friends over to show off their home theatre system. To do this they want the picture visible from all parts of your living room. This means you not only need a large screen but you also need the same quality of picture from anywhere in the room. The Plasma TV delivers this with precision. The pictures viewed from any angle remains the same. All the features we have come to expect on a television screen are present in a Plasma TV. There is picture in picture, the ability to use the screen with either your home theatre or with the computer and other devices. The prices of plasma screens are dropping as more and more consumers demand them and more and more manufacturers are producing Plasma TV. There’s a stiff competition which has not only brought down the prices but also enhanced the features. The prices at present are bit higher due to the lager screens but this will drop further as some manufacturers are coming out with smaller Plasma TV screens.

Stewie
10-02-2007, 04:55 PM
Care to actually dispute any of that, or are you just a plasma fanboy?

You show me that an LCD is better by a viable source (not a blog or the like) . A brand new LCD out of the box that blurs, has horrible viewing angles, and is more expensive is for the sheeple. I thought Sharp had the answer with Aquos (high refresh rate etc.), but they are only middle of the road for LCDs. Sorry. The myth that plasmas lose their brightness in a few years is wrong. LCDs lose their brightness out of the box if you're outside of a 15 degree viewing angle. That's crap. Hell, go to any store and look at an LCD, then move right/left and watch the suckiness. LCDs can only hope they can touch a plasma.

From the CR article:

"Another point that needn't concern you is the difference in longevity between the two technologies. Despite reports you might have read about plasma's allegedly short life span. Both LCD and plasmas should last a good 10 years or more in normal use."

I'll take 10 years of an awesome plasma picture vs. out of the box crappy, blurry-in-fast-action, no-angle LCD.

'Hamas' Jenkins
10-02-2007, 05:33 PM
You show me that an LCD is better by a viable source (not a blog or the like) . A brand new LCD out of the box that blurs, has horrible viewing angles, and is more expensive is for the sheeple. I thought Sharp had the answer with Aquos (high refresh rate etc.), but they are only middle of the road for LCDs. Sorry. The myth that plasmas lose their brightness in a few years is wrong. LCDs lose their brightness out of the box if you're outside of a 15 degree viewing angle. That's crap. Hell, go to any store and look at an LCD, then move right/left and watch the suckiness. LCDs can only hope they can touch a plasma.

From the CR article:

"Another point that needn't concern you is the difference in longevity between the two technologies. Despite reports you might have read about plasma's allegedly short life span. Both LCD and plasmas should last a good 10 years or more in normal use."

I'll take 10 years of an awesome plasma picture vs. out of the box crappy, blurry-in-fast-action, no-angle LCD.


Point by Point

The Viewing angle horseshit:

From FlatTVpeople.com

Viewing Angle Up to 160° for plasma Up to 175° for LCD.

So you're wrong there. Besides, try and find an environment where people regularly watch TV at more than a 45 degree angle. It's bunk.


Durability Plasmas are very fragile making them tricky to ship and install. Unlike the commercials where plasmas are mounted on the ceiling, plasmas are best installed by a professional, and should be installed on a wall that can bear a good deal of weight.

Much more durable than plasmas. End users can easily mount an LCD TV themselves if desired. LCD TVs are far less fragile than plasmas.


Brightness:

LCD TVs can often look better in 'real-world' situations. Plasmas are made with a special glass surface that can reflect light, which dulls the brightness and contrast of the image. LCD TVs reflect very little light, allowing them to maintain levels in well-lit rooms. Both LCD and plasma TVs will meet the brightness expectations of most consumers. However, in 'real world' situations with ambient light, LCD TVs will generally look a little brighter.


Plasmas also lose 1% of their brightness for every 1,000 viewing hours. So five years down the road, compare an LCD with a replaceable backlight with a plasma and you will notice a massive difference


Say you only lose 10% of your brightness with a plasma. Turn your brightness down on your TV 10 notches, and you'll shit yourself in the difference in picture.

Plus, you are going to constantly have to deal with gas pixel death with plasmas. Pixels will get stuck and fail from time to time with LCDs but not at the rate of plasmas

Furthermore, the "blurriness" is horseshit.

Any LCD with a response time of 16ms or less is imperceptible. Current LCDs have response times of 8ms or less. That's a complete non-factor.


Also, current 120 Hz LCDs deliver a much sharper image than do current plasmas.


And the price issue:

Best Buy's lowest 1080p plasma is 1999 (and that's a 42" model)

Compare to a 1080p LCD TV at BB's site, of which there are 13 LCDs 1999 or less, including some like the Toshiba REZGA which are excellent TVs priced at 1499 for a 42" 1080p LCD


You are completely off the mark here.

BWillie
10-04-2007, 12:47 AM
no surprise, vizio is at the bottom of the barrel

They are dirt cheap. What do you expect. Still their ratings are about middle of the line in quality, and the lowest in price. Great value item, just depends what you want to spend.

Lzen
10-04-2007, 03:03 PM
They are dirt cheap. What do you expect. Still their ratings are about middle of the line in quality, and the lowest in price. Great value item, just depends what you want to spend.

Just what I was thinking. I looked at a bunch of TVs before buying. Also looked at a ton of reviews. Vizios held their own against the more expensive brands such as Sony. I'm very happy with my Vizio LCD.

Also I went with LCD over plasma because we get some sunlight in the living room. The LCD screen isn't made of glass and therefore doesn't reflect the light like the plasmas.

Dallas Chief
10-04-2007, 04:57 PM
Just what I was thinking. I looked at a bunch of TVs before buying. Also looked at a ton of reviews. Vizios held their own against the more expensive brands such as Sony. I'm very happy with my Vizio LCD.

Also I went with LCD over plasma because we get some sunlight in the living room. The LCD screen isn't made of glass and therefore doesn't reflect the light like the plasmas.
I hope you never have to get your Vizio serviced. I hear it is cheaper to just go out and buy a new one, even during the warranty period. :shake:

Dallas Chief
10-04-2007, 04:59 PM
That's an LCoS TV...different type.

Personally, I really detest most Sony products, but if I was going to buy a new TV, I'd buy the KDS A3000 SXRD. It's that good.
Why are you still hatin' man? You still haven't gotten your spiff check?

HC_Chief
10-04-2007, 05:20 PM
DLP is still the best price/performance ratio out there.

I recently purchased a Samsung 61" LED DLP... excellent picture & about 1/4 the size of my 2003 Mitsubishi WS65411.

It's not capable of a wall mount, mind you, but it's no deeper than your average 27" CRT. Picture quality is outstanding. :thumb:

FYI: NFM will price match Amazon.com

BWillie
10-04-2007, 11:01 PM
DLP is still the best price/performance ratio out there.

I recently purchased a Samsung 61" LED DLP... excellent picture & about 1/4 the size of my 2003 Mitsubishi WS65411.

It's not capable of a wall mount, mind you, but it's no deeper than your average 27" CRT. Picture quality is outstanding. :thumb:

FYI: NFM will price match Amazon.com

Yeah, if I was just going to use a TV to watch movies and tv like most people I'd go with a DLP. You can get a 70'' DLP for as much as you can get a really nice 50'' LCD. Only reason I want a Plasma or an LCD is so I can use it as a computer AND TV. If you use a DLP that much, you are going to have to change the bulbs like every year. 200-250 bucks a pop, screw that.