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View Full Version : Obviously a scam... right???


IA_Chiefs_fan
10-08-2007, 06:42 PM
So I advertised two 4 wheel drive pickups on Craigslist and keep getting responses from people referring to my "item" for sale. Obviously their angle is that they'd stop payment as soon as they receive it, right? Any way to nail the scammers?
Response 1:
hello to you over there,
saw your 4 wheel drive pickups FS on the site, what is the last price ?.and i am intereted in buying it and my payment will be made in cheque..if interested and available, get back to me with the following details..
(1)condition,age of the item
(2) your full name
(3)postal adress
(4)zip code
(5)state
(6)phone number,home and cell.
Regards james

Response 2:
Hello,
Im okay with the last asking price of the item and i
will love to be the next owner of it so now i want
you to get back to
me with all this necessary information listed below;
NAME TO BE ON THE CHECK
YOUR STATE
YOUR ZIP CODE
YOUR ADDRESS
YOUR OFFICE AND MOBILE PHONE
inorder to
make out the payment and as i have made you to know
that i will be making this payment via certified
check
... And i have a shipping agent who will be incharge
of the item pick- up,So immediately you receive and
cash the check you can contact my shipper for pick
up.
Kindly get back to me right now with the necessary
information and pls i want you to consider the item
sold right now and if any other interested buyer
contact you , You should be telling them that it has
You should betelling them that it has been sold to
me
...Thanks so much for your
understanding and i hope to deal with you in future.
Warmest Regards

Response 3:
Thanks for the mail,I have already contacted a shipper to help me pick up the
item. All you just need to do for me now is that once you receive the
payment you
will deduct your money for the itemthen send the shipping funds to the shipper
via western union money transfer. am sending you a check of ($2,320) and deduct
your money for the car ($850) and deduct the bank transfer charges
then send the
rest to the shipper because she'll be picking up other items for me
before coming to
your location for the pick up of the item...i want you to know i am someone you
can trust,as soon as you send your full details thecheck will get to
in a couple
of days,so keep other buyers off.. thanks for your understanding...if
is ok by you
pls kindly mail me the full details so that the payment can bee send
in as soon as
possible.........

1....your full name to be on the check
2..your full contact address to send the payment to
3..your zip code
4.your mobile and land number to reach you.i will
I will be expect your mail.asap
regard

Rain Man
10-08-2007, 06:48 PM
Ask them to give you a call.


And yes, it's a scam.

banyon
10-08-2007, 06:49 PM
Require Cashier's checks or money orders. If they really want the vehicles they'll do it.

IA_Chiefs_fan
10-08-2007, 06:51 PM
Require Cashier's checks or money orders. If they really want the vehicles they'll do it.
I heard cashiers checks can be more risky than a regular check.

Halfcan
10-08-2007, 06:51 PM
Give them your SSN #, Birth Date, and bank account number. This will speed the transaction along.

Bill Lundberg
10-08-2007, 06:52 PM
Scam,

I got the same exact email when trying to sell a car on autotrader one time.

banyon
10-08-2007, 06:52 PM
Require Cashier's checks or money orders. If they really want the vehicles they'll do it.

Acutally scratch that, these people are probably making forged checks that you will find out are counterfeit 30 days later when the bank wants your money back.

kcfan82
10-08-2007, 06:52 PM
Wait until it all clears, my buddy got nailed on something like that and he cashed American Express travelers checks that were stolen and used as funds to him.

He didn't know until the FBI was at his door.

IA_Chiefs_fan
10-08-2007, 06:53 PM
Ask them to give you a call.


And yes, it's a scam.
What could I do that would really screw over the scam artists? I suppose the local police department wouldn't really give a crap.

Vegas_Dave
10-08-2007, 06:53 PM
All 3 look like typical scams to me. I always am instantly suspiscous with obvious bad grammar (granted I am not the best and I probably will have a mistake in this post as well - but you know what I mean).

I would not even reply to them and ignore them. Wait for something that you feel comfortable with.

As far as nailing them... no not really. There has been no crime committed and no proof that they planned a crime. They "could" be genuinely interested. But if you are not comfortable, you have no obligation to deal with them.

DaKCMan AP
10-08-2007, 06:53 PM
Wait for the guy who wants to buy it as a gift for his friend in South Africa. Sell it to him.

banyon
10-08-2007, 06:57 PM
Here's an article I wrote about these type of scams and some of the more popular variants: This is a variant of the foreign lottery scam
Don’t get Scammed

Have you ever received a letter, phone call, or e-mail telling you that you have already or may already have won thousands of dollars in a contest you don’t really remember entering? Or, even more improbably, have you had someone tell you that they have a check that they want to give you to pay for some fees and then there will be a big payoff? If the expression “It’s too good to be true” comes to mind, then it probably is.

If you’ve ever seen movies like Paper Moon or The Sting, then you’ve seen con artists at work. But these days, as technology has become more sophisticated, so have the con artists. Instead of knocking on your door and trying to sell you a faulty product, the scammer may be working at an internet terminal in a city halfway across the world. I would like to tell you briefly about three types of scams or cons that are coming up most frequently with Pre-Paid Legal members that I have spoken to in the last coupe of months.

1. The “Foreign Lottery Scam”

In this con, the scammer will send you an e-mail or letter saying that you have already won or been confirmed for a big cash prize. They often have some very official sounding names, or may even be using the names or legitimate companies. There’s only one catch: unfortunately, there are some taxes, shipping, or other fees which must be paid before the money can be sent or wired to you. At this point, they ask you either to send them a check to pay for the fees, or they send you an authentic-looking check that they want you to deposit and then send payment back to them or a second entity.

After you deposit their check and send them the money, your bank will discover after a few weeks that the check is fraudulent. You will never hear from the scammer again, but worse, your bank will come after you to repay the funds! If you just sent them the funds directly, then the money is likely just gone.

Why can’t this be real? Well, most importantly, even if it were not a scam, it would still violate federal law. Specifically, 18 U.S.C. 1301 makes it illegal for foreign entities to bring lotteries into this country, and worse, makes it a crime for you to participate.

But there are several tell-tale signs to know that you are dealing with people who are not on the level. First, if the scam has been e-mailed to you, then usually the sender will have a public internet address and not one belonging to a company. For example, instead of getting a message from johnw@uklottery.gov.uk , it will be from johnw@uklottery.yahoo.uk. Also, if they are calling you, it will likely be the same one or two people who always answer the phone. They also may want information about your identity, such as your Social Security Number, your date of birth, or your credit card or bank account numbers.

Never give these people any of your personal information, and better yet, do not respond to their e-mail, phone call or letter.

2. The “Phishing” scam

This scam is usually sent by e-mail, or comes as a pop-up while you are browing the internet. The word “phishing” was created to mean that someone is “fishing” for your personal information. The e-mails try to deceive you into thinking that it is a legitimate e-mail from a company that you may already deal with, such as your bank, or your mutual fund, or even the Internal Revenue Service!

The e-mail or pop-up may contain copies of the real company’s logo, and may ask you to cut or paste web links into your browser that will take you to their website. The scam artists might make a link that looks like it will take you to the real companies’ site, but will actually take you to the con artist’s personal website, rigged to look like the real thing.
The scammer will then ask for your personal information, often pretending that they are just “confirming” information that you have already given to the real company before. If the scammer is able to then get your social security number, date of birth, name, and account number from you, then they will use to information to steal your identity and open other accounts for themselves.

It is important that if you are not sure that your bank or other business is really trying to contact you that you verify this information with the business by placing a call or visiting them to ask about it.

3. The Nigerian E-mail scam

This scam has become so profitable for the Nigerian con artists that it is actually a significant factor in the Nigerian Economy. U.S. and U.K. government sources estimate that there have been losses in excess of 200 Million dollars over the last ten years.

Con artists will send you an e-mail or letter claiming to be legitimate businesspeople, government officials, or surviving spouses of officials. They offer to transfer lots of money into your bank account if you will first pay a “transfer fee” or other taxes. If you reply, they may send you very official-looking government-type documents. They will then request other personal info, and your account information. Some go so far as to invite you to travel to Nigeria or a bordering country to complete the transaction. One you give them your money, personal info, or travel to the country, then you will not receive the promised larger sum of money, or if you do, it will be counterfeit currency.

According to the U.S. State Department, people who have responded to these offers have been subjected to arrest, extortion, severely bodily harm, and even death. If you receive anything remotely resembling this type of scenario, do not reply, give them any personal information, nor give them any money.

For information on even more types of common scams, visit the U.S. Government’s internet fraud websites at http://onguardonline.gov/spam.html and http://www.internetfraud.usdoj.gov . Also you can report this type of information to the U.S. Internet Crime Complaint Center at http://www.ic3.gov or by calling the U.S. Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357).

IA_Chiefs_fan
10-08-2007, 06:57 PM
All 3 look like typical scams to me. I always am instantly suspiscous with obvious bad grammar (granted I am not the best and I probably will have a mistake in this post as well - but you know what I mean).

I would not even reply to them and ignore them. Wait for something that you feel comfortable with.

As far as nailing them... no not really. There has been no crime committed and no proof that they planned a crime. They "could" be genuinely interested. But if you are not comfortable, you have no obligation to deal with them.ahh damnit... why did you have to go and be rational?

Simplex3
10-08-2007, 06:59 PM
I actually read an article about this scam a few weeks ago, but I forget how they work.

You screw with these idiots the same way you always do with scammers. You string them along, constantly feeding them fake information. Keeps them busy. If you're really brave you can even take their money. Chances are they'll be willing to send a down-payment of sorts that will actually clear the bank legally.

banyon
10-08-2007, 07:03 PM
As far as nailing them... no not really. There has been no crime committed and no proof that they planned a crime. .

I agree with the second part, but not the first. Problem is that most law enforcement is equipped to deal with this sort of crime and can't properly investigate it to find the proof they need. These people may already have criminal liability on an "attempted fraud" or "conspiracy to commit fraud" basis. But you're right we don't have the goods on them.

The other problem is that these people are usually in Canada or Africa and enforcement is practically impossible.

IA_Chiefs_fan
10-08-2007, 07:03 PM
What about this one?

Interested Party:
"Hello,
I will like to know if this advert is still available for sale."

Me:
"They are both still for sale. I've had many inquiries but I live far enough away that most can't make it to look at them until the weekend. Give me a call at 641-442-XXXX if you have any further questions."

Interested Party:
"Hello ,sorry for the late in responce,
i realy appreciate your response to my earlier mail.like i said i will like to buy this item so pls do withdraw the advert from Craigslist. I will also like you to know that i will be paying via check due to the distance as i am located in Georgia ,i will need you to provide me with the following information to facilitate the mailing of the check.
1.Your full name
2.Your mailing address be it residential or postal address
3.Your phone number.
**I will like you to know that you will not be responsible for shipping i will have my mover come over as soon as you have cashed the check**
Have a nice day. "

Me:
"Thanks for the response. Since you would be paying by check I would need to hold on to the truck until the check has cleared which I believe can take up to two weeks. Let me know if you're still interested."

Interested Party:
"yes im still interested and i can asure you that it cant take up to 2 weeks before it will clear.get back to me wit info requested for so as to send the check asap..."

Me:
Whatever the most creative response is that one of you comes up with.

banyon
10-08-2007, 07:04 PM
I actually read an article about this scam a few weeks ago, but I forget how they work.

You screw with these idiots the same way you always do with scammers. You string them along, constantly feeding them fake information. Keeps them busy. If you're really brave you can even take their money. Chances are they'll be willing to send a down-payment of sorts that will actually clear the bank legally.

They trade on consumer ignorance of our banking system. People don't realize that the bank forwards you money when the check may take a month to figure out it's a forgery. By then you've spent the money and the bank will come back after you for it, even though you are the victim.

Rain Man
10-08-2007, 07:10 PM
Me:
Whatever the most creative response is that one of you comes up with.

"I just found out that it'll be released from the evidence impoundment lot next week. However, it'll take another couple of weeks to get the smell out of the trunk. Do you want to wait, or do you want it sooner?"

Simplex3
10-08-2007, 07:16 PM
http://www.swapmeetdave.com/Scam/

There's a link to how this would go down for you.

DenverChief
10-08-2007, 07:17 PM
Require Cashier's checks or money orders. If they really want the vehicles they'll do it.

cashiers checks can be taken directly to the bank they originate from to verify funds

dtebbe
10-08-2007, 07:22 PM
I actually read an article about this scam a few weeks ago, but I forget how they work.

You screw with these idiots the same way you always do with scammers. You string them along, constantly feeding them fake information. Keeps them busy. If you're really brave you can even take their money. Chances are they'll be willing to send a down-payment of sorts that will actually clear the bank legally.

Ahhh, that's a good idea. I would request a $500 deposit via Postal Money order and the balance by payment by certified check. Then take the money order to the post office to cash it. I'm pretty sure the post office can look them up on thier system and know instantly if they are good or not.

I played one of these guys on a racing kart I was selling once. The fake check they sent (via DHL no less) was a horrible fake, I could have done a better one on an Apple II.

This scam also usually involves them sending the certified funds for more than you are asking, and you sending them funds for the difference. Then you are out of the difference plus the full original amount when the bogus check bounces.

DT

dtebbe
10-08-2007, 07:27 PM
cashiers checks can be taken directly to the bank they originate from to verify funds

Actually this is not true at all. Some of the mega banks have this capability, but smaller banks do not. Even the huge banks will frequently hold thier own cashiers check for up to 7 business days before funds are available to you.

What I've been doing when I buy or sell a vehicle is to meet the seller at the bank of thier choice and have the check cut and handed to me by the bank. It's the ONLY way I would take a check while signing the title over at the same time.

DT

dtebbe
10-08-2007, 07:29 PM
Oh, and I forgot. The best scam of all is when they "call" you via relay (the service that is supposed to be for the deaf) which is untraceable.

DT

tmax63
10-08-2007, 07:31 PM
I am currently dealing with this situation myself. Have a puppy for sale and they used a relay operator claiming they're hearing impaired. I have returned their e-mail and informed them that I am no longer selling the dog and will return any correspondence to sender. I may give it to the sherriff though just to let them know whats going on. Thanks for bringing this up though. Glad my gut was right.

Halfcan
10-08-2007, 07:51 PM
Herm has lost millions on those lottery scams.

Valiant
10-08-2007, 07:56 PM
Contact the authorities...

KCChiefsMan
10-08-2007, 07:56 PM
if you can confirm it's a scam, ask them where they live and tell them you'll personally deliver the vehicle and beat their ass

IA_Chiefs_fan
10-08-2007, 08:06 PM
"I just found out that it'll be released from the evidence impoundment lot next week. However, it'll take another couple of weeks to get the smell out of the trunk. Do you want to wait, or do you want it sooner?"
So far this is the winner.

trndobrd
10-08-2007, 08:12 PM
All three are the same scam. Here is how they work:

You put item up for sale. They send you a forged check or money order that is for more than the purchase amount, or includes an to be forwarded to a 'shipping agent'. You call the buyer and tell him the check was for more than the purchase amount. He tells you to go ahead with the sale and just to send him a check or money order for the difference. You deposit the check in your bank. Several days later the check clears. You mail a check or money order to buyer. He drags his feet on arranging pick up of the sale item. 4-6 weeks later the bank tells you that the buyers check was forged and you owe the amount that they had credited to your account. Your check for the 'difference' or 'shipping agent' has long since cleared.

Options:

1) You can accept the kind purchase offer. Explain that you are on a tight schedule because you work for the FBI and travel a lot.

2) Explain that you travel extensively and will be happy to deliver the vehicle personally. You just need a physical location.

3) Take the check. Send him a note saying "IOU $500".

4) Call your local law enforcement or the FBI

Rain Man
10-08-2007, 08:53 PM
So far this is the winner.

I win! I win! And it doesn't even matter that I'm the only entrant.

Mr. Plow
10-08-2007, 08:53 PM
Me:
Whatever the most creative response is that one of you comes up with.

"I thank you very much so for the interest in this item. I would lik nuthing more than to ship this very very nice item to you b4 chek clears, but I havn't da monies to wait. if You could send me $5000.00 cash US funds, I would so much like to send you the item right away."

IA_Chiefs_fan
10-08-2007, 09:11 PM
I win! I win! And it doesn't even matter that I'm the only entrant.1st place is 1st place. You earned it. I doubt he'll respond but I'll post it if he does.

Simplex3
10-08-2007, 09:13 PM
1st place is 1st place. You earned it. I doubt he'll respond but I'll post it if he does.
Odds are he will. As long as you're willing to correspond he'll keep firing back.

kcfan82
10-08-2007, 09:21 PM
Just attach a virus to your email response, that should shut him down for awhile.

Option 2 would be post his email, and we can have a CP pearl harbor on his inbox.

Or just tell him you're sending the Nigerian Nightmare after him.

Iowanian
10-08-2007, 09:32 PM
"dear Sir,

Please be aware that we anticipate the odor from and the blood stains will be minimal, however may become a little sharp with increasing heat and humidity.

With a little elbow grease and time, the seats will look much better. You may consider locating a seat and scent waifer on ebay prior to the car's arrival.

Police should be finished with the investigation about the time your check clears.

Thanks,

IACHIEF,

dtebbe
10-08-2007, 09:36 PM
Maybe you should tell him that you recently inherited $50,000,000US and you need an offshore account to deposit it in....

DT

dj56dt58
10-08-2007, 10:03 PM
cut the ****in brakes n give em the damn thing

gta0012
10-09-2007, 12:23 AM
Haha Just string them along with fake information. Then say you will send it and for them to send the fake check etc etc. And go along like your being scammed.

But ask for like a wire transfer or paypal transfer or something straight cash like. And say you need it for shipping. Like $150 something stupid. So they will think they got you. $150 is nothing if they think your sending them a couple grand haha.

Guru
10-09-2007, 12:28 AM
What about this one?

Interested Party:
"Hello,
I will like to know if this advert is still available for sale."

Me:
"They are both still for sale. I've had many inquiries but I live far enough away that most can't make it to look at them until the weekend. Give me a call at 641-442-XXXX if you have any further questions."

Interested Party:
"Hello ,sorry for the late in responce,
i realy appreciate your response to my earlier mail.like i said i will like to buy this item so pls do withdraw the advert from Craigslist. I will also like you to know that i will be paying via check due to the distance as i am located in Georgia ,i will need you to provide me with the following information to facilitate the mailing of the check.
1.Your full name
2.Your mailing address be it residential or postal address
3.Your phone number.
**I will like you to know that you will not be responsible for shipping i will have my mover come over as soon as you have cashed the check**
Have a nice day. "

Me:
"Thanks for the response. Since you would be paying by check I would need to hold on to the truck until the check has cleared which I believe can take up to two weeks. Let me know if you're still interested."

Interested Party:
"yes im still interested and i can asure you that it cant take up to 2 weeks before it will clear.get back to me wit info requested for so as to send the check asap..."

Me:
Whatever the most creative response is that one of you comes up with.

Luv teh grammer dey provyd yoo wit.

greg63
10-09-2007, 12:34 AM
Luv teh grammer dey provyd yoo wit.


LMAO

dtebbe
10-09-2007, 07:47 PM
I know, look up the address of the local FBI field office and give that to them as the address to mail the bogus check to.

DT