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View Full Version : New Eileen Weir article from KCChiefs.com


shaneo69
11-15-2007, 11:57 AM
WEIR: Winds of Change
Nov 15, 2007, 6:02:17 AM by Eileen Weir

Now, thatís more like it. Here we sit at 4-5 and things are finally starting to make sense. With a consensus decision by all Chiefs fans, local reporters, and the national media to call this season a rebuilding year, we are at long last getting that for which we bargained.

Stinks, doesnít it?

Bleak as the training camp and early season predictions were, the nothing-if-not resilient Chiefs squad managed to cobble together a pretty decent run. Contrary to page after page of lackluster statistics, the team has pulled off some impressive and highly unlikely wins. Just a few short weeks ago Coach Herm Edwards was the toast of the town, escaping the hostile territories of San Diego and Oakland with victories and sitting atop the division.

Perhaps the Chiefs unanticipated successes were nothing but an illusion, as some proclaimed then and surely are asserting now. Since not even the most exactingly analytical mathematicians could reconcile how the team was winning while posting negatives in such key categories as points scored versus points allowed, it was suspected that perchance the division-leading record was a product of sheer deception rather than authentic ability. Certainly, when the house of cards came crashing down, it crashed hard.

To recap: since the bye week, the Chiefs are winless, have lost their top-paid player to injury, and have benched their starting quarterback. Stepping in to spark the team is a third-round draft pick and a running back that is fresh off a two-year football hiatus and a damaged neurology. Supporting the effort are a 34-year old wide receiver, a 33-year old cornerback, and 31-year old tight end. Oh boy.

When you put it that way, it sounds absurd. It sounds impossible. It sounds like someone was vacationing on Mars when it came time to draft players and recruit some free agents. The craziest part of it all is this is what Chiefs fans wanted.

Oh, yeah, I mean you. Isnít this the scenario we all envisioned? Keep quarterback Damon Huard in the stable to counsel and advise the young Brodie Croyle, and if need be, bring Huard in for mop up duty in the event of injury or egregiously bad throws. Cut ties with running back Larry Johnson. Hang on to Ty Law in the secondary as well as Tony Gonzalez and Eddie Kennison in the receiving corps to retain the veteran leadership. Although Chiefs fans were eager to see rookies Dwayne Bowe, Tank Tyler and Turk McBride suit up, fans expected the newcomers to be cast in auxiliary roles.

As Coach Edwards has emphasized, the failure of the team, notably on offense, cannot be blamed on one player or one position. When a team completely crumbles the way the Chiefs did against the Green Bay Packers and the Denver Broncos the past two weeks, it indicates disease, not just illness. Falling in the standings as the season goes on, regressing rather than progressing, and losing games to bad teams all serve as alarms that there are problems that may not be fixable.

People suggest the team should simply commit to a transitional year where young players are thrown into the fray and tested in live competition. That proposal allows the team the remainder of the season to evaluate what it has and what it needs. Better to find out now than to discover during next yearís training camp that the Ď05, Ď06 and Ď07 draft picks donít fit the bill. The recommendation to revamp the starting line-up advises that Chiefs fans will understand. We will all be okay with losing the next seven games on the schedule, because in the end we will know how good we are.

On some level, it sounds good. Logical. But hereís reality: Peterson and Edwards will never throw in the towel on this or any other season. And weíd have their heads if they did. As sensible as the argument sounds to replace every aging veteran with their youthful understudy, it isnít going to happen. And why should it?

The teamís objective, after all, is to win. As a fan of the team, I appreciate that. It is the obligation of the franchise to try to win as many games as possible during the course of a season. Peterson, as the GM, would probably be unwilling to test a rookie who he knows to be unprepared for a starting role no matter how highly he was recruited out of college or how much is in his paycheck this week. The GM doesnít make personnel decisions during the season, but if he did, he likely wouldnít make that one.

Likewise, Coach Edwards is doubtless unmoved by the fansí outcry to insert rookies and young players into the game plan. See, unlike us, he has the opportunity to observe playersí readiness during the course of practice, conditioning and film study. His estimation of game skills is the only thing standing between the bench and the playing field. When they are ready, he has assured us, theyíll play.

Coach Edwards will also never confess that the situation is unfixable. It can be fixed, and will be fixed. Maybe not soon, but someday.

That is not to say we donít have the liberty to question and conjecture the fate of our team. We pay the ticket prices, buy the memorabilia, sacrifice our Sunday afternoons in support of our hometown pride. Itís our right to complain if we choose.

What we are observing now is a product that has been years in the making. In some respects we have become victims of our own success, relying too heavily and too long on veterans who have steadfastly provided the foundation of the franchise. Legitimate criticisms of the philosophy and practices of the front office persist for good reason. Some poor drafting in back-to-back-to-back years is suddenly catching up with us. Though there have been some terrific picks and the Chiefs have notoriously fared well in the free agent market, there were not enough home-run picks in the late 1990ís and early 2000ís to establish the underpinning of a champion.

Many commentators who know much more about evaluating talent than I, have professed the dearth of superior talent coming out of college, particularly at the quarterback position. With ever-expanding technology, advancements in nutrition and fitness techniques, and the amount of time and money being invested in coaching and support staffs, the environment of an NFL franchise continues to be built for success. Competition is fiercer than ever and your opponents are as sophisticated as you are, if not more. The schemes that were once considered groundbreaking have become commonplace. Crafting impenetrable game plans is now impossible. Adjustment has always been the key to domination in the NFL, and now more so than ever.

Forget about Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Brett Favre for a minute. Whoís next? Of the remaining 29 starting quarterbacks in the league, who is it that trips your trigger? Who knocks you out at wide receiver beyond Randy Moss and Reggie Wayne? Great tacklers? Shut down corners?

Certainly there are incredible athletes playing todayís game. Every year the quality of gamesmanship in every professional sport increases. It must. Everyone is better, faster, stronger. The players we recall from the past, the greats of the game who sustain their position in our memories, were better than everybody else. They possessed a natural acumen for the game that removed them from the pack. There are fewer of those now.

Chiefs fans, myself included, have been lulled into a zone of satisfaction that is no longer acceptable if one is to be counted among the elite teams of the league. Kansas City supporters have been content to emerge from training camp with a handful of draft picks penciled into the 3-deep chart. We have been comfortable keeping popular and productive players for the entirety of their career rather than trading them in their prime for younger and perhaps less-proven performers. No more.

The good news is the team is leaning in the proper direction. Under the influence of Coach Edwards drafts have been significantly better. Rewarding players for past contributions to the record book remains an area of concern, but perhaps a change of heart will eventually take place. The team has suffered a series of debilitating blows with the successive loss of critical players on the offensive line. But it will get better. Maybe not soon, but someday. Isnít that what we want?

http://www.kcchiefs.com/news/2007/11/15/weir_winds_of_change/

Donger
11-15-2007, 12:02 PM
The GM doesnít make personnel decisions during the season

Is she referring to Carl Peterson?

HemiEd
11-15-2007, 12:16 PM
I didn't know she was a Chief's fan, or knew the first thing about them. I wonder if she is Rufus Dawe's little sister?

Coogs
11-15-2007, 12:22 PM
But it will get better. Maybe not soon, but someday. Isnít that what we want?

I am assuming this was sarcasm on her part, but it is what I want. For the first time this season, I actually can't wait to see the game Sunday.

ChiefsCountry
11-15-2007, 12:34 PM
She is an idiot I would rather read Blob Gretz or Rufus over her anyday.

Calcountry
11-15-2007, 12:47 PM
Likewise, Coach Edwards is doubtless unmoved by the fansí outcry to insert rookies and young players into the game plan. See, unlike us, he has the opportunity to observe playersí readiness during the course of practice, conditioning and film study. His estimation of game skills is the only thing standing between the bench and the playing field. When they are ready, he has assured us, theyíll play.



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She gives Herm way too much credit here.

kc rush
11-15-2007, 12:54 PM
I told myself don't click on the thread, don't read it, but I did it anyway. I think I need a shock collar or something that goes off anytime I begin to read something put out by the Chiefs spin doctors. It only makes me mad or feel like my IQ is dropping 10 points.

Don't taze me bro, I'll try not to read these anymore.

FAX
11-15-2007, 01:03 PM
This is what happens when you allow housewives (whose husbands consider a good sex life to be one in which you invite feathered farm animals to bed) write for a sports team.

There's a lot of frustrated un-published novelist in this girl.

FAX

HemiEd
11-15-2007, 01:47 PM
There's a lot of frustrated un-published novelist in this girl.
FAX

I am guessing her chances of getting breast cancer, is higher than 60%.

penguinz
11-15-2007, 02:24 PM
bad article

Demonpenz
11-15-2007, 02:30 PM
good read