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Count Zarth
11-15-2007, 08:51 PM
Parts I and II at the links below.

http://kan.scout.com/a.z?s=115&p=2&c=701843

http://kan.scout.com/2/702277.html


Last year I had the pleasure of meeting Chiefs Chairman of the Board Clark Hunt for the first time. It was a bit daunting, to be honest with you, because we’re roughly the same age, but I found him incredibly gracious, kind and sincere. Before the start of the 2007 regular season, we sat down to discuss a variety of things.

Clark talked candidly about growing up in the organization and the legacy that his father, the late Lamar Hunt, built for this city and the entire Chiefs nation. He talked about the enormous responsibility of carrying on that tradition. It’s clear he’s not his father, but nonetheless there are striking similarities in their personalities.

WPI: What was your very first memory of the Kansas City Chiefs as a child?

Clark Hunt: “Probably one of my first recollections, and unfortunately it’s not a happy one, was the Christmas Day game. It’s literally the first game I remember, and probably about the only game I remember from that stadium, and of course that was the last game we played in that stadium. I remember sitting in the press box, and the game dragging on and on and on, and at some point I fell asleep on the counter. But before I did that, I also remember Stenerud missing the field goal. I’m not sure, as a small child, if I had a lot of context on that, but I knew it wasn’t good. I woke up and it was over and it was a bad result.”

WPI: At an early age did you have any idea what this franchise was about? You knew your father, Lamar, was the owner. But growing up did you understand the enormity of his passion for his football team?

Hunt: “As a child I’m not sure I fully appreciated my father’s involvement with the league. I do remember, vividly, the weekend when he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. They took me up there that weekend and included me in most of the festivities. I was something on the order of magnitude of seven years old. I’m sure I don’t remember or didn’t understand the significance of it. I’m sure the same thing would be true with the team. I was very much involved in sports myself at that point, but not playing football. But getting to be around these big athletes, that was neat, just like it would be for any kid.”

WPI: In your early teens, you had an opportunity to be a ball boy at training camp. What was your perception of these athletes as a 13 and 14-year old boy?

Hunt: “They were, to a large degree, fun-loving guys who were extremely talented. They loved what they were doing, and all that made a big impression on me. Of course, the line blurs from when I was say 13 or 14, to when I became a ball boy for three years, and was really around them on a daily basis. That was a wonderful experience and I was just thinking this week, being here for training camp, really brought back so many memories.”

“The players called me ‘Little Hunt’ or ‘the little man,’ and things like that, so they were certainly aware of it and when given a chance, they were happy to poke fun at me. I didn’t mind. Probably the most intimidating experience from being a ball boy was wake-up duty in the morning. I had to go door to door, knocking on the doors, waking players up at six. And of course these are very large grown men who were extremely tired at that point in camp, and I remember one time I knocked on a door and it was not latched. The door swung open and I just saw these eyes pop open at me from the bed. I scurried on down the hall to the next room.”

“It was truly a great experience. I was playing football at that point. I was a kicker/punter/quarterback/defensive back, and did a lot of things at a very small school, so getting to be around the guys who were literally the best in the world at that was a super experience for me. I learned a lot about how a pro football team operates.”

WPI: What was it like being the son of someone so famous and successful? Did you ever think you would play pro football?

Hunt: “I’m an extremely competitive person, so I think regardless of my father’s involvement in the sports industry I was destined to play sports growing up. I played a lot of different sports, and over time it sort of gravitated toward football and soccer. The fact that he was Lamar Hunt and had done all of this in the sports business wasn’t really a factor in my head. Now, I was certainly aware – when we went to games a lot of times the fans on the other team would run into him and be aware of how he was, so that was going on off the field. What was happening on the field was completely independent.”

WPI: When you went to college, did you know what you wanted to do? You knew you could get into the family business but it seems like maybe that wasn’t the primary choice?

Hunt: “Like a lot of high school graduates going into college, you don’t know what you want to do, and I really had no clue. I went to a school, SMU, that insisted on you having a very broad curriculum the first year and a half. Over time I gravitated toward the business school, where I ended up being a finance major. It was a little bit different path than my father had taken – he was a geology major, which really related back to his family’s business. But at the end of the day, that’s not really what he did, either. Just shows you that college kids don’t necessarily always get it right. The fact that I went the finance route was probably a pretty good match with my interests and talents and so forth. I definitely was not looking down the line thinking I was going to be involved with these sports businesses my father had started.”

WPI: How supportive was your father in your desire to do something different than beginning your business career outside of the Chiefs organization?

Hunt: “He was really fantastic in that regard. He never pushed me - and the same was true with my siblings – to do what he wanted me to do. He let us be our own individuals and pursue things that we enjoyed. My older brother ended up being a professional musician, and to my knowledge my father had no musical ability. He was great in that regard, and whatever we were involved with he was always about helping us do well at it. I couldn’t have asked for a better role model in that regard.”

“Probably somewhere in the back of his mind he hoped one day I’d return and get involved with what he was doing, but he never said it.”

WPI: Was getting involved with Major League Soccer the first real taste of working with your dad in that kind of environment?

Hunt: “Yeah, it sure was. At this point I’d been back in Dallas about five years, and he grabbed me and had me attend some meetings with him about this new league that was getting together back in 1995. I was happy to do it and I had played soccer in college, had contacts with the sport. There was also a financial aspect in it that we were being presented a new business plan. He wanted me to take it and dissect it and tell me what I thought about it.”

WPI: Do you think this was his way of trying to pull you into the family business?

Hunt: “It may have been, indirectly, although I’m not sure he was really thinking that many steps down the road. I think he was thinking that the World Cup, here in 1994, had been so successful, and he had been a believer in the sport at that point for 30 or so years. He felt the time was right to get back in the business, and certainly was interested in involving me with him.”

WPI: Soon afterward he started taking you to NFL meetings and things like that. Could you see yourself sliding into the role as head of the Chiefs?

Hunt: “The first time that you’re in the room with all the owners, it’s definitely one that’ll open your eyes. It’s somewhat intimidating and I was there with my father, who was so respected. It was interesting to see how much respect he received from the other owners, whether they’d been involved in the league for 40 years or four years. That was really special. It was a completely new experience and I had the contrast of major league soccer, which was a startup enterprise, and the NFL, which was fairly well established. Getting to see it from both ends was interesting and helpful.”

WPI: Through the years you’ve been associated with some of the NFL's greatest leaders. Talk about what you learned from guys like Pete Rozelle, Paul Tagliabue and now with Roger Goodell?

Clark Hunt: “When I got involved was actually the transition from Pete to Paul. That actually may have the first series of meetings, which was somewhat interesting because it was not at all clear that we were going to end up with Paul as the commissioner. There was a split and ultimately it worked out great. But I certainly was aware that Paul was a very different individual than Pete had been. Pete was the consummate marketer, and was exactly the right person for the league when he was at the helm.”

“I think in the same regard, Paul was exactly the right person for the league when he took over. At that point the league was going through some legal struggles with the player’s association and he came in helped the league get past that. Now we have Roger, who is probably a blend of those two individuals, plus someone who brings a very sharp business mind to the commissioner’s office. Again, it’s probably exactly the right person for the job at this time.”

WPI: What was the conversation like when your dad told you it was your time to take over the Kansas City Chiefs?

Hunt: “I can’t really say that there was any one conversation, but it was more of a gradual process, with him giving me more and more responsibility. Certainly as his health started to go downhill more and more that process accelerated. There were meetings that he was not able to attend. Issues where we might have jointly tackled them in the past, he just came to me and said ‘will you take care of this?’ So it was something that took place over time. He was never someone to sit down and say ‘here’s the grand plan, and this is where we’re headed, it’s going to all fall in your lap.’ There was never a conversation like that. But it certainly evolved that way over time and I was happy to do it for him.”

WPI: How difficult was it for you personally not to have your father around this past offseason?

Hunt: “Obviously it was such a huge change. Even though his health was in decline, if you had asked any of us last fall we’ve have said he was going to be with us for several more years. We just believed that because he’d been fighting it for so many years and fighting it successfully. It was definitely a shock to us and a tremendous loss. This year with each milestone that’s passed, whether it’s been the draft, or mini camp, or training camp, it’s occurred to me that wow, this is the first one of those that he’s ever missed.”

“He was with the Chiefs/Texans from day one, and that’s really stuck in my mind. Clearly the big change for me is in a lot of ways, being the face of the organization. No matter how much of the hard grunt work I was doing the last several years, he was always going to be the face of the organization, so really that’s been the biggest change for me.”

WPI: Your dad was very patient and had tremendous loyalty to people, but being younger and a different generation, do you want to win faster?

Hunt: “A misconception about my father is that he was not competitive. I think nothing could have been further from the truth, but it was overshadowed by his tremendous humility. The way he treated people and the way he was so humble, people thought he didn’t have a killer instinct. And he really did – his nickname as a child was ‘games,’ and that was because he liked to compete and play, and he was that way his whole life. He spent his entire 50-year business career doing nothing but sports. He actually was very competitive, but I don’t think it showed. I’ve been told by my friends that I might be a little bit competitive, and it’s certainly true. I definitely want to win, and I want to win now, not five years from now.”

“But I’ve also been around the business long enough to know that we’re in a very, very competitive business, where there are 31 other teams who are working very hard with great coaches and great staffs, so it doesn’t come overnight. What’s important to me is that we’re taking the steps now that over a three to five-year period builds a winning team. It’s very easy to get off track, we saw that in KC in the late 70s and 80s, and you see it in other cities where a few mistakes or the cumulative effect of a few mistakes over years can really put you in the ditch and make it hard to get out. I am extremely focused on winning. I do have some of my father’s patience, but probably not the large dose.”

WPI: You are very fortunate to have a person like President Carl Peterson, who has spent 18 years with the organization. How much does that help you knowing you can trust someone else to get things done?

Hunt: “Maybe this was some of my father’s foresight in this, and maybe he never came out and said it, but by virtue of being involved over the last 10 to 15 years, I’ve built a very good relationship with Carl. I was thinking about just today, how awkward it could have been for Carl to work with my father for 17 years and then all of a sudden have a new, 42-year-old boss. It hasn’t been like that at all, it’s been fantastic, and that goes back to the working relationship we’ve had going back the last several years.”

“My father gave me more and more responsibility, and part of that was getting Carl signed up on his last contract, which started to establish that relationship between he and I which was appropriate. I think the Chiefs organization is very blessed to have someone of his capability, both in business and the football side. It is a huge asset to me, being new to my role, to have someone as capable as he is, running the team.”

WPI: When you have a player like Larry Johnson, how do you as the owner balance paying a player like that with fielding a winning football team? Did you or your father at any point ever tell Carl Peterson not to sign a player because of the financial commitment it might take?

Hunt: “I’m not aware that my father ever told Carl ‘no’ to any financial commitment to bring any player to Kansas City, and certainly in my short tenure I’ve never done so either. I have the benefit of looking at some of the other organizations, who have owners who want to win now, and have decided that the free agent market is the way to do that, and have been abject failures at it. Conversely, I have the good example of organizations in New England, and Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, just to pick three, who have methodically gone about building their football team. That’s not to say they aren’t active in the free agent market, because they are, but they’re very strategic and thoughtful about what they do.”

“What’s going on with the other side, is that those organizations are doing a better job of building their team through the draft. I really believe that, I know my father believed that – he was very funny about draft choices and actually had it in Carl’s contract that he needed to accumulate more draft choices than the stated seven every year. We have a head coach who feels exactly the same way. It’s a very long-winded answer, but there are many faces to it and I think if you let your emotions rule your judgment it’s really easy to screw up a football team.”

WPI: How would you like to look back on your legacy in the next 15 or 20 years?

Hunt: “I haven’t really thought about what I want per se to be my legacy, but it has dawned on me that I will never be able to fill my father’s shoes – the guy who created the American Football League and helped make the NFL what it is today. At least in sports I don’t think I have a shot at recreating what he did, and he did that in many sports, he did it in tennis and soccer. I’m probably not going to leave that kind of legacy but there are three things as it relates to the Chiefs that I would hope the organization will be recognized for under my leadership.”

“First of all, most importantly, is having a very competitive football team on the field. Secondly, is having the team and our players being a positive influence on the community in Kansas City. And thirdly, I want to continue the tradition of Arrowhead really being the best fan environment, and the best place to watch a football game, in the country.”

SoCalBronco
11-15-2007, 09:02 PM
You should have done the interview instead of dumbass Athan.

KC Tattoo
11-15-2007, 09:04 PM
So Clarks NOT going to fire Carl...


:sulk:

Tribal Warfare
11-15-2007, 09:09 PM
So Clarks NOT going to fire Carl...


:sulk:


It's BS, The shit I saw at the Bengal game in '05 does not dictate that quote properly.



I am extremely focused on winning. I do have some of my father’s patience, but probably not the large dose.”



but this one does :rockon:

smittysbar
11-15-2007, 09:11 PM
Did they give him a BJ too. This is some of the worst ?'s I think any person could come up with.
Very bad interview IMO.

smittysbar
11-15-2007, 09:14 PM
WPI: You are very fortunate to have person like President Carl Peterson, who has spent 18 years with the organization. How much does that help you knowing you can trust someone else to get things done?




This is the dumbest question they could have asked. You will get nothing in response to the question. What a BJ Job done by WPI

Fruit Ninja
11-15-2007, 09:28 PM
Yeah, so Fortunate that we have what 1 play off win since he's been GM. That right there is just awesome. Well, if your the Raiders, Broncos or Chargers.

unothadeal
11-15-2007, 09:30 PM
Weak.

Tribal Warfare
11-15-2007, 09:32 PM
Well, if your the Raiders, Broncos or Chargers.


At the same time, the stated teams have reached the SB under King Carl's reign of 19 years except KC.

Smed1065
11-15-2007, 09:32 PM
So winning a SB is not in the top 3 objectives to his legacy?
I am very patient but to not be in the top 3 of his legacy plans does not sit well after 18 years with me.

-----------------------------------------------------------
“First of all, most importantly, is having a very competitive football team on the field.
Secondly, is having the team and our players being a positive influence on the community in Kansas City.
And thirdly, I want to continue the tradition of Arrowhead really being the best fan environment, and the best place to watch a football game, in the country.”

----------------------------------------------------------

Raises a red flag big time!

cdcox
11-15-2007, 09:40 PM
I thought it was a good interview.

If you come out with your guns blazing for Carl Peterson you are going to be shown the door very quickly. A man like Clark Hunt would not put up with being put in such an uncomfortable situation.

The question that asked "how lucky are you to have someone as great as Carl Peterson" went too far though. You can be differential and respectful to a man of great power, without looking like an eager to please poodle.

BigRedChief
11-16-2007, 05:24 AM
I thought it was a good interview.

If you come out with your guns blazing for Carl Peterson you are going to be shown the door very quickly. A man like Clark Hunt would not put up with being put in such an uncomfortable situation.

The question that asked "how lucky are you to have someone as great as Carl Peterson" went too far though. You can be differential and respectful to a man of great power, without looking like an eager to please poodle.Ask a hard question and you can forget ever getting another one. I get that.

But, you did go too far in the sucking up. It was not neccesary to praise King Carl as all knowing, all seeing GM/CEO/El Presidente before you ask Clark a question.

BigRedChief
11-16-2007, 05:26 AM
So winning a SB is not in the top 3 objectives to his legacy?
I am very patient but to not be in the top 3 of his legacy plans does not sit well after 18 years with me.

-----------------------------------------------------------
“First of all, most importantly, is having a very competitive football team on the field.
Secondly, is having the team and our players being a positive influence on the community in Kansas City.
And thirdly, I want to continue the tradition of Arrowhead really being the best fan environment, and the best place to watch a football game, in the country.”

----------------------------------------------------------

Raises a red flag big time!
Yep, not a good thing.

stevieray
11-16-2007, 06:39 AM
Yep, not a good thing.

he has stated that he wants the trophy that bears his dad's name...

Chiefnj2
11-16-2007, 07:27 AM
"What’s important to me is that we’re taking the steps now that over a three to five-year period builds a winning team. "


That's all you need to know about Carl and Herm's job security.

scott free
11-16-2007, 07:32 AM
I thought it was a good interview.

If you come out with your guns blazing for Carl Peterson you are going to be shown the door very quickly. A man like Clark Hunt would not put up with being put in such an uncomfortable situation.

The question that asked "how lucky are you to have someone as great as Carl Peterson" went too far though. You can be differential and respectful to a man of great power, without looking like an eager to please poodle.

QFT.

stevieray
11-16-2007, 07:33 AM
"What’s important to me is that we’re taking the steps now that over a three to five-year period builds a winning team. "


That's all you need to know about Carl and Herm's job security.

coool! a built in excuse!

Chiefnj2
11-16-2007, 07:40 AM
coool! a built in excuse!

One can never have too many 5 year plans.

stevieray
11-16-2007, 07:48 AM
One can never have too many 5 year plans.

that used to be true. this is it...

BigChiefFan
11-16-2007, 08:14 AM
Why the **** does the guy asking questions give Carl props? Sounds like ass-kissing 101.

Skip Towne
11-16-2007, 08:20 AM
Why the **** does the guy asking questions give Carl props? Sounds like ass-kissing 101.
Because Nick Athan is a fluffer.

King_Chief_Fan
11-16-2007, 08:20 AM
What a waste of *&^$ing time. Kissing ass at it's finest. We may have been better off letting this team head to LA

Otter
11-16-2007, 08:24 AM
Must have been tough to do that interview on his knees with Clark's cock in his mouth.

Good lord, show some spine.

ChiefsFan4Life
11-16-2007, 08:32 AM
WPI: You are very fortunate to have a person like President Carl Peterson, who has spent 18 years with the organization. How much does that help you knowing you can trust someone else to get things done?

What the ****? Dumbest ****ing "question" ever. IDIOTS

Otter
11-16-2007, 09:29 AM
WPI: I hope this doesn’t sound weird or anything but I took a photo of you on the field in Arrowhead and had it blown up to life size and hung above my bed. One time the WPI guys had a dress as your favorite Chief sleepover and everyone was dressed as a player but I came dressed as you. Everyone was like ‘you just put on your Dad’s sport coat, you don’t even have a jersey’ but I didn’t care. I was like “I’m Clark Hunt beeotch!”

Are you still there? Oh, OK I couldn’t hear you breathing, thought I lost signal. Is Clark actually in the room with you? Ask him if he liked my idea to give away thunder sticks at the entrances.

Anyway, if an NFL team were allowed to have one dinosaur on its roster what kind would you have and how do you think this would effect the NFL offside’s and roughing the passer rules?

RustShack
11-16-2007, 09:37 AM
WPI sucks

Nzoner
11-16-2007, 09:51 AM
Is this the shit that people pay for when subscribing to WPI?

If so good job to WPI you're right up there with King Carl,just keep taking the fools for their money.

Dave Lane
11-16-2007, 10:40 AM
Total fluff piece....

beach tribe
11-16-2007, 11:42 AM
Whoever interviewed him is a total PUSSY.

MTG#10
11-16-2007, 02:06 PM
I hope Nick Athan dies in a horrible car crash on his way home tonight, and his body is so mutilated it has to be a closed casket at his funeral, which nobody will attend.

KCChiefsFan88
11-16-2007, 03:02 PM
This "interview" (using the term lightly, since it was basically a propaganda, ass-kissing, puff-piece that belonged on kcchiefs.com) is Exhibit A for why no one respects Wargarbage Illustrated and why that medium is viewed as nothing more than a mouthpiece for the Chiefs.

This "interview" was a giant pile of garbage and the person who conducted this interview should be humiliated for essentially bending over and taking it from Clark Hunt.

Being dickless and gutless are obviously two of the qualifications for working at Wargarbage Illustrated.

CupidStunt
11-16-2007, 03:06 PM
LMAO

StcChief
11-16-2007, 03:14 PM
new name crowned... WGI it is....

JohninGpt
11-16-2007, 03:19 PM
Total fluff piece....
Yeah, I was really hoping the interviewer would say "Clark, why the hell is Carl still on your payroll?"

wazu
11-24-2007, 12:19 PM
WPI: You are very fortunate to have a person like President Carl Peterson, who has spent 18 years with the organization. How much does that help you knowing you can trust someone else to get things done?

ROFL

Rain Man
11-24-2007, 12:59 PM
That Carl Peterson question made me think of the French collaborators during World War II. Nick, when we get Carl Peterson out of there, we're going to shave your head and parade you through Paris.

Rain Man
11-24-2007, 01:47 PM
Okay, this was a 16-question interview. What did we learn here? Maybe that Clark's first memory of the Chiefs conditioned him to pain?

In a 16-question interview, you should get more information than that. If I could ask him 16 questions, here's what they would be?

1. So seriously, what dirt does Carl Peterson have on the Hunt family? It's got something to do with that whole silver market thing, right?

2. I'm going to ask you to put on your Nostradamus hat now. Do you think that Brodie Croyle will ever attempt a pass of more than 7 yards in his NFL career? And if so, when do you anticipate making the coaching change?

3. There's a legend among Chiefs fans that Carl Peterson is the spawn of Satan, and that he exists only to ensure that we never find happiness. Have you ever questioned why he smells like sulphur and eats live crickets at team lunches?

4. Imagine that you have two choices. In Choice A, you can make $10 million a year on the Chiefs, and they will never win a playoff game. In Choice B, you can make $8 million a year, and they will win a Super Bowl once a decade. Which choice would you select, and if it's B, when do you plan to fire Carl and Herm?

5. You're really, really rich. What's the coolest thing you own? A submarine? Some sort of cool secret tunnel? Something that confirms Hinduism as the only true religion?

6. Who do you think has played a bigger role in the Chiefs organization, Carl Peterson or Jack Steadman? And do you hold it against them?

7. Imagine that the Chiefs got to the Super Bowl next year. Now imagine that we lost 2-0 because Herman Edwards had the ball on 4th down at the other team's 1 yard line with 10 seconds left in the game, and he chose to punt. What would you say to the team in the locker room after the game?

8. Does it frustrate you to watch Herman Edwards' offense, too?

9. Hypothetical here. You've seen Star Wars, right? Imagine that you're the Emperor, and Darth Vader works for you. Darth has a lot of seniority in the organization, but honestly, he gets his butt kicked time and time again by the Rebels, despite having far more experience in his job and a lot of money at his disposal. What do you tell Darth at his annual performance review?

10. We all know that rich guys are chick magnets, and you're really, really rich. How many nations are represented among the women that you've...er....successfully Hunted? And if you've planted the flag in Myanmar, was it with one of those women who wear all of the rings to make their necks look really long?

11. During the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln promoted General Grant to lead the Union army over a more timid general, and was known to make the statement of "I can't spare this man - he fights." Do you think that there are any parallels between your situation now and Lincoln's situation before he promoted Grant?

12. If Chiefs came to you with indisputable proof that Carl Peterson was the spawn of Satan - and I'm talking indisputable here, photos and stuff - would you fire him?

13. I see that you got your start in soccer. Have you explained to Herm that you need to score more points to win in football than in soccer?

14. What do you think would be the reaction of Chiefs fans if you fired Carl Peterson, and how would it compare to the reactions of Germany when the Berlin Wall went down? Would it be a bigger celebration, or a smaller celebration?

15. Back to the women thing. You're really, really rich, so just stop me when the answer is no. Twins? Triplets? Quadruplets? Quint....

16. In the name of all that is holy, would you PLEASE fire Herm and Carl? You would be beloved by millions if you did. PLEASE? Hey, why are those guards coming in? PLEEEEEEEASE! Hey, let go? PLEEEEEEEEASE!

Dylan
11-24-2007, 02:21 PM
I'm going to ask you to put on your Nostradamus hat now.

I still think about that thread, and go hysterical... ROFL

Dylan
11-24-2007, 02:48 PM
"My father gave me more and more responsibility, and part of that was getting Carl signed up on his last contract, which started to establish that relationship between he and I which was appropriate. I think the Chiefs organization is very blessed to have someone of his capability, both in business and the football side. It is a huge asset to me, being new to my role, to have someone as capable as he is, running the team.”
WPI: How would you like to look back on your legacy in the next 15 or 20 years?

Hunt: “I haven’t really thought about what I want per se to be my legacy, but it has dawned on me that I will never be able to fill my father’s shoes" ...

" "First of all, most importantly, is having a very competitive football team on the field. Secondly, is having the team and our players being a positive influence on the community in Kansas City. And thirdly, I want to continue the tradition of Arrowhead really being the best fan environment, and the best place to watch a football game, in the country."


What could be more important than winning the Super Bowl? --

The community tracing their hand-outs -- or thirdly claims to make scrubbing the bathrooms fun?

I'm just trying to understand...

The interview with Hunt, is one of the main reasons I feel sorry for sports fans, myself included. http://65.18.214.134/images/smilies/candle.gif

Mojo Rising
11-25-2007, 01:22 AM
What could be more important than winning the Super Bowl? --

The community tracing their hand-outs -- or thirdly claims to make scrubbing the bathrooms fun?

I'm just trying to understand...

The interview with Hunt, is one of the main reasons I feel sorry for sports fans, myself included. http://65.18.214.134/images/smilies/candle.gif

It is common for people to state that Carl is only interested in filling seats and not winning a Championship. Who sets that goal? The Hunts are as responsible as the King for the recent mediocrity.

Tribal Warfare
11-25-2007, 03:10 AM
3. There's a legend among Chiefs fans that Carl Peterson is the spawn of Satan, and that he exists only to ensure that we never find happiness.



Spawn? he's Lucifer himself