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mlyonsd
11-18-2007, 08:15 AM
Ok, now that I have your attention....

I'm looking to strip and refinish a little old jewelry night stand as an Xmas present for my wife. It was hers when she was a kid. blah blah blah

I'm looking for suggestions on what techniques and specifically what products work best for taking paint and stain off. I'm also interested in what tools people have used for this kind of project.

Thanks in advance.

stevieray
11-18-2007, 08:18 AM
if it is gold or silver, take it to a jeweler to be cleaned...they can make it look brand new...between an isotner, steam, cut and rouge...it will SHINE....

Skip Towne
11-18-2007, 08:21 AM
I was tricked into opening this thread. A pox on you.

NUMBER7
11-18-2007, 08:22 AM
You are a very bad man. Seriously, I have used Homer Formby's kits before and they do a great job.

Fairplay
11-18-2007, 08:23 AM
I curse you.

mlyonsd
11-18-2007, 08:25 AM
if it is gold or silver, take it to a jeweler to be cleaned...they can make it look brand new...between an isotner, steam, cut and rouge...it will SHINE....

It's a wooden night stand. Believe me I'd be smart enough to let a jeweler handle the kind of stuff you're talking about.

stevieray
11-18-2007, 08:30 AM
It's a wooden night stand. Believe me I'd be smart enough to let a jeweler handle the kind of stuff you're talking about.

doh! sorry... :banghead:

there are plenty of good strippers for wood(no pun intended) out there...use steel wool instead of sandpaper..I'd suggest using Deft laquer for your final clear coat...

Coach
11-18-2007, 08:32 AM
Just make sure you are protected in case they approach you for attention.

Simplex3
11-18-2007, 08:35 AM
Stain AND paint? Like stacked on eachother? From when your wife was a little girl?

You could be talking about lead-based paint. We took at least 7 coats of paint and varnish off of my great grandmother's bent-arm rocking chair when we rebuilt/refinished that. Paints and varnishes back then weren't meant to be healthy or environmentally friendly, they were meant to be hard and last. Basically we found that there were two steps to getting that stuff off:

1. Chemical peeler. Lots of it. Twice.

2. Sanding and lathing the crap out of everything.

The chemical peelers can be a little scary. Any time you introduce a liquid onto a wood you're taking a little risk, but with those hardened finishes you probably can't get them off any other way. You also don't want to sand lead paint off, you'll just be standing in a cloud of lead.

If you're planning on doing this at home when she's around you'd better come up with a good excuse for the smell before you start, too.

Good luck! If it comes out it can be beautiful. My great grandmother's rocking chair looks better today than it did back in the 1850s when it was build.

Groves
11-18-2007, 08:51 AM
Most guys in your shoes are either "into" the steps it will take to do this job, or they're "not really into it". If you're not comfortable with these processes, just take it to a refinisher that will dip the whole thing in a vat of chemicals. Refinishing small items like this can be a PITA, though.

Are you looking to end up with the natural wood showing?

Extra Point
11-18-2007, 09:13 AM
This stuff is the best http://www.bixmfg.com/bix_stripper.htm :

MIAdragon
11-18-2007, 09:19 AM
what ever you do make sure you are OUTSIDE that stuff is nasty

KcMizzou
11-18-2007, 09:25 AM
Damnit!

The old bait and switch.

Baconeater
11-18-2007, 09:36 AM
Most guys in your shoes are either "into" the steps it will take to do this job, or they're "not really into it". If you're not comfortable with these processes, just take it to a refinisher that will dip the whole thing in a vat of chemicals. Refinishing small items like this can be a PITA, though.

Are you looking to end up with the natural wood showing?
I highly recommend this.