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bsp4444
12-26-2007, 09:30 AM
I just looked out and noticed my heating/AC fan outside is encased in ice. What's the remedy for that?

HonestChieffan
12-26-2007, 09:31 AM
warm weather....

thats a smartass answer....you should have a heating element on the outdoor unit...sounds like yours is not working.

KCHawg
12-26-2007, 09:31 AM
Thaw it out

Saulbadguy
12-26-2007, 09:34 AM
That son of a bitch would freeze up in the middle of summer on the equator!

Demonpenz
12-26-2007, 09:38 AM
antifreeze

bsp4444
12-26-2007, 09:38 AM
warm weather....

thats a smartass answer....you should have a heating element on the outdoor unit...sounds like yours is not working.

Thanks. That sounds like something I can't fix. Guess I'll have to wait for the service team to look it over, but they won't be getting to me today.

HonestChieffan
12-26-2007, 09:40 AM
its a defrost cycle in the unit...not a do it yourself job.

HonestChieffan
12-26-2007, 09:43 AM
There is on a heat pump......

Donger
12-26-2007, 09:45 AM
Unless you are running your air conditioning, it's irrelevant. The unit outside has nothing to do with your furnace.

Dartgod
12-26-2007, 09:47 AM
There is on a heat pump......
I see.

Please disregard my previous post. I am and idiot.

bsp4444
12-26-2007, 09:47 AM
It is a heat pump, so the outside unit runs all year.

HonestChieffan
12-26-2007, 09:48 AM
Idiot claim honored. Its Ok, all mistakes and errors are forgiven effective Jan 1.

HonestChieffan
12-26-2007, 09:50 AM
I guess you realize if you lived in Olathe, you wouldn't have any of these heating issues.

Donger
12-26-2007, 09:52 AM
It is a heat pump, so the outside unit runs all year.

Oh. Well, in that case, you're going to freeze soon.

cardken
12-26-2007, 10:37 AM
If you have a Heat Pump, you have a low charge, you'll notice your indoor air will be luke warm at best, but switch thermostat over to Emergency Heat. This will activate heating elements inside of your furnice, will provide temporary heat until you can get service out to charge unit. Also check your Air Filter, if clogged will cause lines to outside unit from Air Handler(Furnice) to become incased in ice.Re member a heat pump only heats efficently up to 34 degrees. After that you should switch over to Emergency Heat, it always amazed me that they install those unitd in the mid west. :banghead:

KC Kings
12-26-2007, 01:22 PM
If you have a Heat Pump, you have a low charge, you'll notice your indoor air will be luke warm at best, but switch thermostat over to Emergency Heat. This will activate heating elements inside of your furnice, will provide temporary heat until you can get service out to charge unit. Also check your Air Filter, if clogged will cause lines to outside unit from Air Handler(Furnice) to become incased in ice.Re member a heat pump only heats efficently up to 34 degrees. After that you should switch over to Emergency Heat, it always amazed me that they install those unitd in the mid west. :banghead:
Heats efficiently up to 34 degrees, or 34 degrees over the outside temperature?

We have a 2,400 square foot house, a heat pump, and very rarely does the emergency kick in. If it is in the teens outside or if it is in the 30s and our garage door has been opened a while it will kick in, but other than that our house stays at 68 with no problem.

Stewie
12-26-2007, 01:58 PM
Heats efficiently up to 34 degrees, or 34 degrees over the outside temperature?

We have a 2,400 square foot house, a heat pump, and very rarely does the emergency kick in. If it is in the teens outside or if it is in the 30s and our garage door has been opened a while it will kick in, but other than that our house stays at 68 with no problem.

It depends on your brand of heat pump and how old it is. Some newer heat pumps can keep your house warm when the outside temperature is around 20 degrees. I toyed with the idea of a heat pump last year but decided to go with a 94%+ efficient gas furnace. If you're on KCPL and have a heat pump you'll also get a discount on the cost of electricity from mid-September until sometime in the spring.

cardken
12-26-2007, 03:21 PM
Heats efficiently up to 34 degrees, or 34 degrees over the outside temperature?

We have a 2,400 square foot house, a heat pump, and very rarely does the emergency kick in. If it is in the teens outside or if it is in the 30s and our garage door has been opened a while it will kick in, but other than that our house stays at 68 with no problem.
34 degrees outside. like the other poster stated, depends on the age of your model. You must have fantastic insulation.

HonestChieffan
12-26-2007, 03:28 PM
I love people who bag on heat pumps. Had one in Indy, and one in KC house and have two currently.

cardken
12-26-2007, 07:09 PM
I love people who bag on heat pumps. Had one in Indy, and one in KC house and have two currently.
I have no probem with Heat pumps, but they were designed for a less agressive winter climate. They are perfect for those of us in Las Vegas. :hmmm:

cardken
12-26-2007, 07:14 PM
Heat pump
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A heat pump is a machine or device that moves heat from one location (the 'source') to another location (the 'sink' or 'heat sink'), using work. Most heat pump technology moves heat from a low temperature heat source to a higher temperature heat sink.[1] Common examples are food refrigerators and freezers and air conditioners and reversible-cycle heat pumps for providing thermal comfort.

Heat pumps can be thought of as an heat engine which is operating in reverse. One common type of heat pump works by exploiting the physical properties of an evaporating and condensing fluid known as a refrigerant. In heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) applications, a heat pump normally refers to a vapor-compression refrigeration device that includes a reversing valve and optimized heat exchangers so that the direction of heat flow may be reversed. Most commonly, heat pumps draw heat from the air or from the ground. Air-source heat pumps do not work well when temperatures fall below around −5C (23F). Okay, 23 degrees I stand corrected. :hmmm:

DaFace
12-26-2007, 07:50 PM
My parents have an "emergency heater" installed along with their heat pump because they don't work worth crap once the temperature gets down too low.

Hog Farmer
12-27-2007, 08:30 AM
Sounds like someone has put sugar in your freon. Theres only one way to check it out.

bsp4444
12-27-2007, 08:39 AM
Heat pump
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A heat pump is a machine or device that moves heat from one location (the 'source') to another location (the 'sink' or 'heat sink'), using work. Most heat pump technology moves heat from a low temperature heat source to a higher temperature heat sink.[1] Common examples are food refrigerators and freezers and air conditioners and reversible-cycle heat pumps for providing thermal comfort.

Heat pumps can be thought of as an heat engine which is operating in reverse. One common type of heat pump works by exploiting the physical properties of an evaporating and condensing fluid known as a refrigerant. In heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) applications, a heat pump normally refers to a vapor-compression refrigeration device that includes a reversing valve and optimized heat exchangers so that the direction of heat flow may be reversed. Most commonly, heat pumps draw heat from the air or from the ground. Air-source heat pumps do not work well when temperatures fall below around −5C (23F). Okay, 23 degrees I stand corrected. :hmmm:

It's heat pump with a propane furnace backup. It runs off of the cheaper electricity until the temperature falls below a certain point (23 deg., as pointed out) then the propane furnace kicks on.