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View Full Version : What career should I take?


Jenson71
12-26-2007, 02:33 PM
Poll to come. Whichever, wins, is the one I will be.

Maybe.

Ultra Peanut
12-26-2007, 02:50 PM
Agent 0071

Jenson. Jenson Jenson.

Douche Baggins
12-26-2007, 02:51 PM
How about something that doesn't require you to be an arrogant prick? I think you'd make a fine green grocer.

BucEyedPea
12-26-2007, 04:05 PM
Pope.
You'd make a terrific Pope.

HonestChieffan
12-26-2007, 04:26 PM
All those require some degree of talent.

Buehler445
12-26-2007, 04:40 PM
FBI Agent, provided you have some physical ability.

banyon
12-26-2007, 04:59 PM
I think they could all be rewarding.

But,


STAY THE F*** AWAY FROM FAMILY LAW!!!

That sh*t wears on those people a lot and the lawyers start acting as petty and vindictive as their clients. It's like they say in Criminal Law you see bad people at their best. In Family law you see decent people at their worst.

General civil work (other than pure collections) is good work if you can get it. I seriously considered grad degrees in Poli Sci and History and eventually settled on philosophy and do not regret it, but I think both areas would be great. But unless you go to grad school in an elite program, most of my friends who went to KU have a hell of a time finding a job, usually wind up teaching some mindless stuff at community colleges.

Certainly I hope you're joking about basing it on the outcome of a poll which will surely result n "FBI Agent" since that's cool and there's lots of movies about it and non-attorneys often have disdain for attorneys (and the general disdain for academia based on RW news & radio).

DenverChief
12-26-2007, 05:20 PM
I think they could all be rewarding.

But,


STAY THE F*** AWAY FROM FAMILY LAW!!!

That sh*t wears on those people a lot and the lawyers start acting as petty and vindictive as their clients. It's like they say in Criminal Law you see bad people at their best. In Family law you see decent people at their worst.

General civil work (other than pure collections) is good work if you can get it. I seriously considered grad degrees in Poli Sci and History and eventually settled on philosophy and do not regret it, but I think both areas would be great. But unless you go to grad school in an elite program, most of my friends who went to KU have a hell of a time finding a job, usually wind up teaching some mindless stuff at community colleges.

Certainly I hope you're joking about basing it on the outcome of a poll which will surely result n "FBI Agent" since that's cool and there's lots of movies about it and non-attorneys often have disdain for attorneys (and the general disdain for academia based on RW news & radio).


So you are saying your fellow KU law grads are having a hard time finding work?

banyon
12-26-2007, 05:32 PM
So you are saying your fellow KU law grads are having a had time finding work?

I didn't say that in my post (I was referring to my graduate school colleagues), but I would agree that law grads are having a tough time too. (Not as tough as people with a functionally useless grad degree in philosophy :)).

My class was worse than any class of the last 10-15 years at % of people with a law job within 6 months of graduation IIRC. I was part of that. The main problem is that law schools have become a money making enterprise. They accept way more people than any corresponding need in the vocation. I don't know if its still true (it probably is), but when I was in, they said that there are more people in law school right now than there are practicing lawyers.

Most people who go to law school, or at least a lot of them (50-65%) don't go there because they want to be attorneys and know what the job entails. They go there hoping it is the answer to their problems in life and will put an extra digit on their salary. There are also girls who go there to find husbands. Anyway basically supply exceeds demand by a ridiculous degree.

I'll say this. It was WAY easier getting my 2nd legal job than my first. Employers who didn't even bother to send me form rejection letters the first time around wanted two interviews and to discuss compensation. That year and a half of experience seems more important to the legal world than in other fields, but maybe that is just my personal bias.

DenverChief
12-26-2007, 05:43 PM
I didn't say that in my post (I was referring to my graduate school colleagues), but I would agree that law grads are having a tough time too. (Not as tough as people with a functionally useless grad degree in philosophy :)).

My class was worse than any class of the last 10-15 years at % of people with a law job within 6 months of graduation IIRC. I was part of that. The main problem is that law schools have become a money making enterprise. They accept way more people than any corresponding need in the vocation. I don't know if its still true (it probably is), but when I was in, they said that there are more people in law school right now than there are practicing lawyers.

Most people who go to law school, or at least a lot of them (50-65%) don't go there because they want to be attorneys and know what the job entails. They go there hoping it is the answer to their problems in life and will put an extra digit on their salary. There are also girls who go there to find husbands. Anyway basically supply exceeds demand by a ridiculous degree.

I'll say this. It was WAY easier getting my 2nd legal job than my first. Employers who didn't even bother to send me form rejection letters the first time around wanted two interviews and to discuss compensation. That year and a half of experience seems more important to the legal world than in other fields, but maybe that is just my personal bias.


Interesting...I am working on my Masters in Criminology right now hopefully going to go to Law School and specialize in criminal law.... Hoping to jump from street level law enforcement to courtroom law enforcement... I'm also hoping my experience as a peace officer will help with getting a job :shrug:

Cochise
12-26-2007, 05:55 PM
I wouldn't worry about it like it's a lifetime choice. Most people change careers several times during their working lives.

Ultra Peanut
12-26-2007, 05:55 PM
I think they could all be rewarding.

But,


STAY THE F*** AWAY FROM FAMILY LAW!!!

That sh*t wears on those people a lot and the lawyers start acting as petty and vindictive as their clients. It's like they say in Criminal Law you see bad people at their best. In Family law you see decent people at their worst.

General civil work (other than pure collections) is good work if you can get it. I seriously considered grad degrees in Poli Sci and History and eventually settled on philosophy and do not regret it, but I think both areas would be great. But unless you go to grad school in an elite program, most of my friends who went to KU have a hell of a time finding a job, usually wind up teaching some mindless stuff at community colleges.

Certainly I hope you're joking about basing it on the outcome of a poll which will surely result n "FBI Agent" since that's cool and there's lots of movies about it and non-attorneys often have disdain for attorneys (and the general disdain for academia based on RW news & radio).Oh my God.

sportsman1
12-26-2007, 05:59 PM
Thats why I think im going to double major in Business and Sociology. It offers several possibilities and enables the chance for Law School. Ive heard conflicting reports about the job market for lawyers though.

a1na2
12-26-2007, 06:01 PM
So you are saying your fellow KU law grads are having a hard time finding work?

Look at how long it took him to find work.

banyon
12-26-2007, 06:02 PM
I wouldn't worry about it like it's a lifetime choice. Most people change careers several times during their working lives.

Yeah, but if you pick up several tens of thousands of $ in law school debt, you may want to stick with it for a while.

jAZ
12-26-2007, 06:04 PM
As if I didn't already know before I clicked submit... FBI Special Agent is the runaway winnar!

Ultra Peanut
12-26-2007, 06:04 PM
Yeah, but if you pick up several tens of thousands of $ in law school debt, you may want to stick with it for a while.What are you, poor or something?

banyon
12-26-2007, 06:06 PM
Interesting...I am working on my Masters in Criminology right now hopefully going to go to Law School and specialize in criminal law.... Hoping to jump from street level law enforcement to courtroom law enforcement... I'm also hoping my experience as a peace officer will help with getting a job :shrug:

My guess is it would help you on the Prosecution or Public Defense side of the game.

I've got a colleague who is a criminal and he seems to know lots of tricks for his defendant clients. ;)

a1na2
12-26-2007, 06:06 PM
Are those all of the choices you have?

Mechanical Engineer

Electrical Engineer

Civil Engineer

Check out the range of salaries for those disciplines, it really isn't too bad.

I've seen ME's from $30K and up depending on location, CE's are pretty much the same with the higher scales on either coast.

EE's, my field, I've seen salary ranges between $40K to $125K in OKlahoma. I know the national average for my experience level is nearly $70K.

Some lawyers in the Lawrence area are at $62.4K

Location means everything when it comes to availability of professional positions and money.

I understand pimping is quite lucritive as well.:)

banyon
12-26-2007, 06:08 PM
What are you, poor or something?

I just wanted to take all that cash from the other tax payers so i could later justify my big government authoritarian ideology.

Ultra Peanut
12-26-2007, 06:10 PM
Are those all of the choices you have?

Mechanical Engineer

Electrical Engineer

Civil Engineer

Check out the range of salaries for those disciplines, it really isn't too bad.

I've seen ME's from $30K and up depending on location, CE's are pretty much the same with the higher scales on either coast.

EE's, my field, I've seen salary ranges between $40K to $125K in OKlahoma. I know the national average for my experience level is nearly $70K.

Some lawyers in the Lawrence area are at $62.4K

Location means everything when it comes to availability of professional positions and money.

I understand pimping is quite lucritive as well.:)go away

banyon
12-26-2007, 06:33 PM
Tom Gash's only concerns are that he thinks he makes $8k a year more than someone who's only been out of school a couple of years. Who'd figure him to be so shallow? Oh, everyone, never mind.

a1na2
12-26-2007, 07:20 PM
Tom Gash's only concerns are that he thinks he makes $8k a year more than someone who's only been out of school a couple of years. Who'd figure him to be so shallow? Oh, everyone, never mind.

think again bozo.

You've been out of school for two years and just now starting your career?

I have 25 years experience and am making well above the national average for my field.

Face it, your fantasy life will never live up to my real life.

Start chasing ambulances now while you have the chance.

banyon
12-26-2007, 07:27 PM
think again bozo.

You've been out of school for two years and just now starting your career?

I have 25 years experience and am making well above the national average for my field.

Face it, your fantasy life will never live up to my real life.

Start chasing ambulances now while you have the chance.

No moron. I started two years ago. I guess reading comprehension is not a prerequisite for your field.

Cochise
12-26-2007, 07:28 PM
Yeah, but if you pick up several tens of thousands of $ in law school debt, you may want to stick with it for a while.

Eh. It's just money. Money isn't a very good thing to go around hating your life over.

banyon
12-26-2007, 07:30 PM
Eh. It's just money. Money isn't a very good thing to go around hating your life over.

Couldn't agree more. But I still intend to repay my loan.

a1na2
12-27-2007, 01:17 AM
No moron. I started two years ago. I guess reading comprehension is not a prerequisite for your field.

Revert to calling names when you don't have a truthful answer? Yep, that't the lawyer I'd want ..... NOT!

After a struggle and a slew of stupid temp jobs, I got a real-life adult attorney job right in Lawrence, KS.



After a struggle and a slew of stupid temp jobs .....

Which part of that statement causes me to think you started two years ago? One would think that it would be a good thing to have more of a memory regarding what you post.

Passed the bar yet?

a1na2
12-27-2007, 01:20 AM
Couldn't agree more. But I still intend to repay my loan.

And how many years and dollars did you have to go in debt to get the job? Nice thing to do, starting your life off in debt. Hopefully for you the firm you went to work for pays off the debt for your education after you work for them for a few years. If not you might try the Army, I understand they pay off student loans after a period of successful service.

Mr. Flopnuts
12-27-2007, 01:58 AM
Revert to calling names when you don't have a truthful answer? Yep, that't the lawyer I'd want ..... NOT!





You're such a hypocritical ****.....

Saggysack
12-27-2007, 03:47 AM
None of those. All of those careers require work. I hear pan-handling has been paying out lately. I'm sure you can find a store and it's parking lot to rent somewhere.