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View Full Version : Food and Drink Three days of the duck.


cdcox
12-26-2007, 11:23 PM
I bought two ducks for Christmas dinner (my wife, me, and daughter).

Actually I only made the breasts for Christmas. First time I'd cooked duck breasts. They came out okay, but I'll do way better next time. They came out about medium, when medium rare was my goal. The skin was a little less crispy than I wanted, due to selecting the wrong recipe. And they weren't as warm as I would have liked at serving time, due to trying to do to many things that finished at the last second. But it was a good learning experience and I'll knock them out of the park next time.

Tonight we had the legs and thighs. I did a braise but kept the skin crispy. They were phenomenal, maybe better. Used this recipe:

http://www.randomhouse.com/broadway/bittman/recipes/france/duck.php

The rest (carcass, wings, neck, and giblets) went into a stock. If it were me, this would go into a gumbo. But the Mrs. doesn't like gumbo. Any ideas that would show off a great stock?

RJ
12-26-2007, 11:30 PM
Man, a duck stock gumbo sounds great. I say make another pitch to the wife. If it still doesn't fly you could make a soup that tastes like gumbo but is cleverly disguised with some pasta or beans. I'll bet a white bean soup would be good with duck broth.

cdcox
12-26-2007, 11:41 PM
Man, a duck stock gumbo sounds great. I say make another pitch to the wife. If it still doesn't fly you could make a soup that tastes like gumbo but is cleverly disguised with some pasta or beans. I'll bet a white bean soup would be good with duck broth.

:hmmm: She's not a big fan of okra. So if I leave the okra out...

I'm thinking about laying down a base of the onion, celery, green pepper trinity, adding the stock, then throwing in some shrimp and andouille sausage, and spicing it up with some tobascco and cayenne pepper.

I could also make the rice optional...

She'd see through my ruse in the end, but she'd probably like the finished product

Ari ümlaüt
12-26-2007, 11:43 PM
that shit sounds delicious.

RJ
12-26-2007, 11:48 PM
:hmmm: She's not a big fan of okra. So if I leave the okra out...

I'm thinking about laying down a base of the onion, celery, green pepper trinity, adding the stock, then throwing in some shrimp and andouille sausage, and spicing it up with some tobascco and cayenne pepper.

I could also make the rice optional...

She'd see through my ruse in the end, but she'd probably like the finished product



That's what I was thinking, that there was probably a specific part of gumbo she doesn't like.

Maybe you could do what you just described, then add some cream or half and half, let it thicken a bit and then serve over some pasta, maybe penne or egg noodles or fettucine. Tell her it's Cajun Bolognese.

RJ
12-26-2007, 11:54 PM
Oh, and throw in some parmesan. Chicks dig cheese.

2bikemike
12-26-2007, 11:57 PM
I have never prepared duck myself I am a bit intimidated by it. I have had it prepared for me a few times. Twice it wasn't very good kinda greasy. And the rest of the times it was pretty good.

Fish
12-26-2007, 11:59 PM
Did you guys hear the McRib is back?

cdcox
12-27-2007, 12:51 AM
Oh, and throw in some parmesan. Chicks dig cheese.

That whole deal you described with the cream and cheese and pasta sounds pretty damn good.

cdcox
12-27-2007, 01:08 AM
I have never prepared duck myself I am a bit intimidated by it. I have had it prepared for me a few times. Twice it wasn't very good kinda greasy. And the rest of the times it was pretty good.

The whole grease thing has to be managed properly. Duck meat is very lean and muscular. But it is surrounded by a 1/16" layer of fat and skin. You want to keep the skin (which is great when cooked correctly) while getting rid of a good portion of the fat. I never eat chick or turkey skin, and always keep all of the duck skin that is attached to meat. (I trim and throw away all of the loose skin not attached to meat).

Tonight's dish was perfect. The skin was crisp and delicious and most of the fat had rendered away from the meat. Where did it go? Some of it was trimmed away before going in the skillet, some got poured away, but the rest of it was soaked up by the carrots, celery and leeks. The meat was very tender. We had a nice pinot (I'm not drinking any of that F'n Merlot) that also helped cut the fat. A bite of the meat, with the veggies cooked in the fat, and a swig of pinot was just about as good as it gets.

All the fat is skimmed off the stock, so the fat will be no issue there.

ClevelandBronco
12-27-2007, 01:16 AM
How is it that Chiefs fans know more about food than any others? Maybe it's just the freewheeling nature of the board itself, but I've never run across any football fans who know as much about food as some of the folks here. I've bookmarked several food discussions on the Planet.

If the guys that run your favorite team ever learn jack shit about football, this could be the best site ever.

seclark
12-27-2007, 06:52 AM
How is it that Chiefs fans know more about food than any others? Maybe it's just the freewheeling nature of the board itself, but I've never run across any football fans who know as much about food as some of the folks here. I've bookmarked several food discussions on the Planet.

If the guys that run your favorite team ever learn jack shit about football, this could be the best site ever.

if the guys that run our favorite team ever learn jack shit about football, we'd never talk about preparing food, etc.
sec

DBO82
12-27-2007, 08:12 AM
if the guys that run our favorite team ever learn jack shit about football, we'd never talk about preparing food, etc.
sec


So its Carls fault our wives are fat....

RJ
12-27-2007, 10:32 PM
So what'd you do with the duck broth?

'Hamas' Jenkins
12-27-2007, 10:40 PM
Deck the hawrs with boughrs of hawry

fa ra ra ra ra/ ra ra ra ra

cdcox
12-28-2007, 01:00 AM
So what'd you do with the duck broth?

Still in the fridge. I may end up freezing it and using it in January or so. I'll update when I make something with it.

cdcox
08-17-2008, 06:59 PM
So what'd you do with the duck broth?

I finally used half of the duck stock today.

I broke down and made my mushroom risotto (what the Mrs wanted me to do with it), which I typically do 3 or 4 times year with chicken stock. The other change I made was I bought dried morel mushrooms ($$). Served it with our favorite Pinot. Turned our phenominal.

I'm still thinking about gumbo or something similar for the other half of the duck stock.

I'm definiely doing another coulple of ducks this coming Christmas season. The stock is out of this world.

Fire Me Boy!
08-17-2008, 07:25 PM
I'm a little surprised it was still good!

I made some crab spaghetti tonight.

One major bonus of living right here on the ocean is cheap seafood.

One major drawback is IF I can get ahold of a decent steak, it's ****ing expensive. Although, every now and then I run across a cryopak of flat iron steaks for $3.99 a pound.

Fire Me Boy!
08-17-2008, 07:25 PM
I think I'm gonna try my hand at duck in the near future.

Fire Me Boy!
08-17-2008, 07:26 PM
I have no idea what I'll do... probably just wing it. Hopefully, I can get the wife to foot the bill.

ROFL I crack myself up.

Fire Me Boy!
08-17-2008, 07:27 PM
Be warned - my puns can be pretty fowl sometimes. If I get overboard, I really hope someone will keep me abreast of the situation.

Fire Me Boy!
08-17-2008, 07:28 PM
OK everyone. Now it's your tern.

Fire Me Boy!
08-17-2008, 07:28 PM
ROFL

Oh, shit. I have to stop now.

chasedude
08-17-2008, 07:31 PM
This thread is turning fowl.

Bowser
08-17-2008, 07:33 PM
...

Skip Towne
08-17-2008, 07:44 PM
I have no idea what I'll do... probably just wing it. Hopefully, I can get the wife to foot the bill.

ROFL I crack myself up.

You're easily entertained.

Bugeater
08-17-2008, 08:03 PM
I'm a little surprised it was still good!

I made some crab spaghetti tonight.

One major bonus of living right here on the ocean is cheap seafood.

One major drawback is IF I can get ahold of a decent steak, it's ****ing expensive. Although, every now and then I run across a cryopak of flat iron steaks for $3.99 a pound.
Is it really cheaper there? When I was in Seattle it sure as hell wasn't any cheaper than it is here. I was kinda surprised by that.

Fire Me Boy!
08-17-2008, 08:24 PM
Is it really cheaper there? When I was in Seattle it sure as hell wasn't any cheaper than it is here. I was kinda surprised by that.

Fresh is about the same price as frozen in KC. The big thing around here is shrimp. I can get good fresh shrimp a LOT cheaper than frozen in KC.

cdcox
08-17-2008, 08:30 PM
I'm a little surprised it was still good!



It wasn't.

It was phenominal. :D

blueballs
08-17-2008, 09:15 PM
Do you wear pear glitter lotion
while basting inn your approns

RJ
08-17-2008, 09:56 PM
I finally used half of the duck stock today.

I broke down and made my mushroom risotto (what the Mrs wanted me to do with it), which I typically do 3 or 4 times year with chicken stock. The other change I made was I bought dried morel mushrooms ($$). Served it with our favorite Pinot. Turned our phenominal.

I'm still thinking about gumbo or something similar for the other half of the duck stock.

I'm definiely doing another coulple of ducks this coming Christmas season. The stock is out of this world.



I'm just happy to know the duck broth didn't go to waste.

Morel mushroom risotto with a pinot......slumming it tonight, huh? Seriously, sounds mighty good.

I'm thinking gumbo with duck broth is a damn fine idea.

cdcox
08-17-2008, 10:12 PM
Morel mushroom risotto with a pinot......slumming it tonight, huh? Seriously, sounds mighty good.



Yeah, I probably spent $60 on dinner tonight, which just sounds ridiculous to me. But it was HELLA lot better than the $50 dinner we had out the other night at the local brew pub. I had a very average meatball hoagie, my wife had a ruben with fatty corned beef, and my daughter had a chefs salad. Throw in beverages (two brews and an iced tea) and a tip and it was $50. Eating out disappoints more often than not. I'd rather spend the money on some good ingredients and make something really good. The food's better, plus I get to putz around in the kitchen for a couple hours, which I enjoy when I have the time to do it.

Simply Red
08-17-2008, 10:21 PM
I bought two ducks for Christmas dinner (my wife, me, and daughter).

Actually I only made the breasts for Christmas. First time I'd cooked duck breasts. They came out okay, but I'll do way better next time. They came out about medium, when medium rare was my goal. The skin was a little less crispy than I wanted, due to selecting the wrong recipe. And they weren't as warm as I would have liked at serving time, due to trying to do to many things that finished at the last second. But it was a good learning experience and I'll knock them out of the park next time.

Tonight we had the legs and thighs. I did a braise but kept the skin crispy. They were phenomenal, maybe better. Used this recipe:

http://www.randomhouse.com/broadway/bittman/recipes/france/duck.php

The rest (carcass, wings, neck, and giblets) went into a stock. If it were me, this would go into a gumbo. But the Mrs. doesn't like gumbo. Any ideas that would show off a great stock?


alright, let me know if you have any questions.

cdcox
08-17-2008, 10:28 PM
alright, let me know if you have any questions.

Why do they call it "gumbo"? Seems like a funny word.

cdcox
12-06-2008, 05:42 PM
Almost a year later, I'm finally using the rest of the duck stock in a pot of shrimp and sausage gumbo. Tasting out of the pot, it's really good. As soon as the rice is done, I'll be eating.

Here's the brief recipie:

1 cup oil and 1 cup flour cooked into a nice tan roux.
Trinity of green pepper, celery, and onion sauted in oil 15 min
Add roux to trinity with 2 cloves garlic.
Added 2 cups turkey stock (left over from last night's dinner) and 8 cups duck stock stirr till blended.
Add 1/4 cup worcestershire sauce, 6 oz tomoato paste, 1 can tomoatoes, 2/3 cup italian parsley, and the following to taste: salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, old bay seasoning, cummin, thyme and Tobasco.
Simmer 30 min
Added 12 oz Andouille sausage and 1 lb shrimp. Boiled the shrimp shells in 1 cup water and added to the gumbo.
Simmer 30 min.
Added 1 T white wine vinegar.

Served over white rice.

JuicesFlowing
12-06-2008, 06:08 PM
That sounds awesome cdcox. I have never eaten duck, what would it compare to?

cdcox
12-06-2008, 06:21 PM
That sounds awesome cdcox. I have never eaten duck, what would it compare to?

All dark meat. Better than turkey dark meat. But what sets duck apart are the skin and fat. Chicken fat and turkey fat are nasty, but duck fat is very good. The skin is very crispy too, if cooked properly. When eating the meat, fat and skin, duck tends to be very rich. A glass of wine does a good job of cutting though the fat while complimenting the flavor of the duck.

You skim the fat off the duck stock, so it's not fatty -- just very rich and flavorful.

Fire Me Boy!
12-19-2009, 11:18 AM
Bump. I'm gearing up for duck on Christmas.

cd - how'd you make your duck stock?

I'm thinking about roasting the duck on a vertical roaster, which should help crisp ALL the skin.

I also just purchased a Thermapen (http://www.thermoworks.com/products/thermapen/splashproof_thermapen.html) - I've been wanting one for YEARS. No more waiting for the damn thermometer to register the temp.

cdcox
12-19-2009, 01:34 PM
cd - how'd you make your duck stock?



I don;t remember exactly. I would have had two raw duck carcasses with the breasts and thigh/leg removed. I would have also had the raw giblets and bones from the parts we had already eaten. I would have also used onions, carrots, celery, fresh flat-leaf parsley, garlic, bay leaf etc. Two ways I could have gone from here:

1) Just throw everything in the stock pot and make stock as normal.

2) Toss the aromatic veggies with canoloa oil. Put them in a roasting pan together with the duck parts. Roast at 425F for about 1 hour stirring every 15 minutes. Transfer everything in the roasting pan to the stock pot. Deglaze the roasting pan on the stove with a cup of water and add to stock pot. Add water to cover, and make stock as normal.

I't was a very rich stock, so I'm thinking I probably used method 2. But that isn't really applicable to a roasted duck.

Now if you roast the duck you are going to have lots of good stuff in the roasting pan. If you don't fold that into a sauce, you want to capture it for the stock by deglazing the roasting pan. Then I'd put the uneaten portion of the duck (unless there is a whole breast or thigh leftover) in the stock pot and make like you would a chicken or turkey stock.

Fire Me Boy!
12-19-2009, 01:40 PM
I don;t remember exactly. I would have had two raw duck carcasses with the breasts and thigh/leg removed. I would have also had the raw giblets and bones from the parts we had already eaten. I would have also used onions, carrots, celery, fresh flat-leaf parsley, garlic, bay leaf etc. Two ways I could have gone from here:

1) Just throw everything in the stock pot and make stock as normal.

2) Toss the aromatic veggies with canoloa oil. Put them in a roasting pan together with the duck parts. Roast at 425F for about 1 hour stirring every 15 minutes. Transfer everything in the roasting pan to the stock pot. Deglaze the roasting pan on the stove with a cup of water and add to stock pot. Add water to cover, and make stock as normal.

I't was a very rich stock, so I'm thinking I probably used method 2. But that isn't really applicable to a roasted duck.

Now if you roast the duck you are going to have lots of good stuff in the roasting pan. If you don't fold that into a sauce, you want to capture it for the stock by deglazing the roasting pan. Then I'd put the uneaten portion of the duck (unless there is a whole breast or thigh leftover) in the stock pot and make like you would a chicken or turkey stock.

Probably will use the drippings for a sauce of some sort, just not sure what yet. But definitely planning to make stock afterward. I usually use a pressure cooker, though. Saves time, and I don't find there's any difference in flavor. Only thing is my stock doesn't end up being clear. Which I'm not making soup with it, so who cares?

cdcox
12-19-2009, 01:42 PM
Probably will use the drippings for a sauce of some sort, just not sure what yet. But definitely planning to make stock afterward. I usually use a pressure cooker, though. Saves time, and I don't find there's any difference in flavor. Only thing is my stock doesn't end up being clear. Which I'm not making soup with it, so who cares?

Yeah, I don't even use cheese cloth on mine. I normally don't care too much about how my food looks.

I kind of like having a pot of stock on the stove all day. Makes the whole house smell good.

Fire Me Boy!
12-19-2009, 01:55 PM
Yeah, I don't even use cheese cloth on mine. I normally don't care too much about how my food looks.

I kind of like having a pot of stock on the stove all day. Makes the whole house smell good.

It does smell good. I just don't like having to deal with cooking something that long.

I don't do cheesecloth either on mine. A fine mesh strainer is good enough for me. If you REALLY wanna get it clear, run it through a coffee filter.

The last batch of beef stock I made ended up like jello after it cooled. SOOOO much collagen in there, I was thrilled. It'll be very rich, though. I've got a couple quarts of beef and a couple of turkey stock in the freezer right now. Will be using the turkey stock for stuffing for the Christmas dinner.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-19-2009, 03:07 PM
In college I was too poor to buy ground beef and had to live on ducks, quail, rabbit, trout and pheasant. That sounds weird, but it's true. I wasn't a great cook or anything but I know a few things that I'll pass along.

I usually cook the duck breasts separately - as noted, rare is great. I usually served them w/some kind of cranberry relish (boil a cup of cranberries in O.J. til they burst) to 'cut the fat'

The legs go into cassoulet, a french bean dish w/sausage & white beans:
cassoulet (http://homecooking.about.com/od/soups/r/blss157.htm)

You can roast a few carcases and pick enough meat off to make a supper, then make duck broth w/remaining bones. Duck gumbo rocks, or add the broth to a sausage and chicken gumbo. Be certain not to waste the duck fat. Use it to fry potatoes. The best cooking fat for fried potatoes I've ever found. Srsly. (http://the-cooking-of-joy.blogspot.com/2009/03/duck-fat-potatoes.html)

BigOlChiefsfan
12-20-2009, 11:07 AM
How to make duck confit with the duck legs. Confit is an old method of cooking and preserving meat in it's own fat - predates canning. We used to do this w/some fat beef as well:

duck confit (http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Duck-Confit-102313)

Once this has been cooked as above, it'll keep in the fridge for like a month under the duckfat. Make some cassoulet w/the confit - as in the previous link. If you're not squeamish, you can buy live ducks @ farmers markets for not much money - or find them at Asian markets. I'd buy 2 or 3, it's no more mess and you've got the fixin's for some serious good eats.