PDA

View Full Version : Coyote got one of my goats....


Calcountry
01-01-2008, 05:28 PM
The question of the day, will anti-freeze kill these fuggers?

'Hamas' Jenkins
01-01-2008, 05:30 PM
If it bleeds, antifreeze will kill it.

stumppy
01-01-2008, 05:35 PM
Go with a rabbit call and varmit rifle. It's more fun.

Calcountry
01-01-2008, 05:36 PM
If it bleeds, antifreeze will kill it.I am seriously thinking about leaving the little bit of carcass they left, with a bowl of the stuff nearby to help them wash down their snack with. Do you think they will be attracted to it at all?

Skip Towne
01-01-2008, 05:38 PM
Get a donkey and/or Great Pyrenees dogs.

Reaper16
01-01-2008, 05:44 PM
I read the title as "Croyle got one of my goats." That was confusing.

Simply Red
01-01-2008, 05:45 PM
I am seriously thinking about leaving the little bit of carcass they left, with a bowl of the stuff nearby to help them wash down their snack with. Do you think they will be attracted to it at all?
yes.

Demonpenz
01-01-2008, 05:46 PM
I read the title as "Croyle got one of my goats." That was confusing.

Well thats what you get for getting 1.5 yards close to him

2bikemike
01-01-2008, 05:48 PM
I am seriously thinking about leaving the little bit of carcass they left, with a bowl of the stuff nearby to help them wash down their snack with. Do you think they will be attracted to it at all?

Only problem is if something like your dog gets into it. I would go with the target practice method.

DenverDanChiefsFan
01-01-2008, 05:51 PM
The question of the day, will anti-freeze kill these fuggers?sorry for your loss of a loved one
:) j/k

2bikemike
01-01-2008, 05:55 PM
sorry for your loss of a loved one
:) j/k

Nice one!

BigMeatballDave
01-01-2008, 06:03 PM
Ever taste antifreeze? Very sweet.

Calcountry
01-01-2008, 06:16 PM
Only problem is if something like your dog gets into it. I would go with the target practice method.This is why I am ambivalent about doing this. There is a stupid yellow chow down the road whose owners are incapable of keeping on their property. My luck, that fuggin thing finds the anti freeze, goes home, pukes its guts out, they take it to the animal control, and they go CSI on me.

Since I am in the animal business, it would be a PR disaster. However, I am in the county, and my livestock are at risk to further attacks.

Calcountry
01-01-2008, 06:17 PM
sorry for your loss of a loved one
:) j/kMy daughter cried when she found the remains of "cuz".

CrazyPhuD
01-01-2008, 06:19 PM
Motion sensor triggered claymore's are a much better solution than anti freeze. Set them up and forget about them. If you wake up one moring and find a fine red mist on your lawn you know you got the coyote or a nosy neighbor. Just make sure you face them away from the house! :)

Bill Parcells
01-01-2008, 08:14 PM
Those ****ers were introduced over here to keep the deer population under control, and now they're out of control and attacking kids.

Shoot the ****ing thing Bunny.

BTW..Happy new year from your old friend Bill Parcells.

Delano
01-01-2008, 08:24 PM
Those ****ers were introduced over here to keep the deer population under control, and now they're out of control and attacking kids.


I believe Coyotes are native to North America.

You can try setting up a sound system that plays Mountain Lion noises. I've read that works in some situations. If the Mountain Lion soundtrack does not work, record the sound of antifreeze glug-glugging out of a bottle and into a dish.

NewChief
01-01-2008, 08:26 PM
Get a donkey and/or Great Pyrenees dogs.

Pyrenees is the answer. Just be sure you read up about them before you get one. If they don't properly understand their boundaries, they can easily become a Dis-a-pyrenees as my brother found out. He had two, and they would wander within about a 10 mile area. He had two intact male litter mates, though. They're great dogs, but there are some things to research about the breed before you get them.

Brock
01-01-2008, 08:33 PM
Those ****ers were introduced over here to keep the deer population under control, and now they're out of control and attacking kids.

They're native.

Buehler445
01-01-2008, 08:40 PM
Go with a rabbit call and varmit rifle. It's more fun.

This is the correct answer.

Although I've heard of a donkey working really well with horses. I can't imagine goats would be that different.

But I suggest you blast it. It will make you feel better.

Skip Towne
01-01-2008, 08:57 PM
Pyrenees is the answer. Just be sure you read up about them before you get one. If they don't properly understand their boundaries, they can easily become a Dis-a-pyrenees as my brother found out. He had two, and they would wander within about a 10 mile area. He had two intact male litter mates, though. They're great dogs, but there are some things to research about the breed before you get them.
In the '90's, I had a herd of 300 Angora goats on my 150 acres. All nannies. We sheared them for the mohair twice per year. In 5 years I never lost a goat to a coyote. I kept 2 Pyrenees and a donkey and they stayed with their herd constantly. I've never heard of them leaving the property. One Pyrenee can whip 3 coyotes. And coyotes travel in packs and are sneaky. When they see a dog they will send out one coyote to bring it in then 4 or 5 of them will jump the dog. Several times I would see "old Duke" all scratched up and limping. I'd get on the 4 wheeler and go find 2-3 dead coyotes. Coyotes are deathly afraid of Donkeys. Donkeys are mean. And I'm sure calling in coyotes and shooting them is fun but it is ineffective. You would have to do it every day and you still wouldn't be rid of them. In SE Kansas there is one coyote per square mile. Most people would be surprised at what a coyote looks like. They are small, 50 pounds or so and skinny and scraggly looking. Dogs and donkeys are the only way I know of to control them.

JohninGpt
01-01-2008, 09:05 PM
Leave a box labled "ACME" outside with dynamite, rockets, and rollerskates. The coyote will take care of the rest. I saw it on TV.

Moon§hiner
01-01-2008, 09:06 PM
I worked for a farmer 20 or so years ago and we had 500 head of lambs on a pasture and were losing a couple per night to coyotes. Parked a grain truck in the pasture and it worked for a couple days, then more deaths. Finally went out every day and moved the truck a few yards and never lost another one the rest of the winter...We'd go out on 3 wheelers and dirt bikes with sawed off shot guns....got 25 that winter...nothing tougher than skinning a coyote and saving his eyelashes.

Skip Towne
01-01-2008, 09:07 PM
Leave a box labled "ACME" outside with dynamite, rockets, and rollerskates. The coyote will take care of the rest. I saw it on TV.
:LOL: I remember that. Beep beep.

Phobia
01-01-2008, 09:09 PM
So, did the coyote stretch her out or did she have a coyoat?

Skip Towne
01-01-2008, 09:15 PM
I worked for a farmer 20 or so years ago and we had 500 head of lambs on a pasture and were losing a couple per night to coyotes. Parked a grain truck in the pasture and it worked for a couple days, then more deaths. Finally went out every day and moved the truck a few yards and never lost another one the rest of the winter...We'd go out on 3 wheelers and dirt bikes with sawed off shot guns....got 25 that winter...nothing tougher than skinning a coyote and saving his eyelashes.
Coyotes are smart, and hungry. I'm not surprised they caught on to the grain truck. Or the "Mountain Lion " sounds. They just send down one coyote to check it out. If it is dangerous they gang it. If not then there you are. I've had guys say leave a radio playing. Doesn't work.

smittysbar
01-01-2008, 09:19 PM
Get a donkey and/or Great Pyrenees dogs.

We have a Great Pyrenees. He will not leave the herd of cattle for nothing, it is truly amazing how these dogs work.

Bill Parcells
01-01-2008, 09:25 PM
They're native.
Not on the East coast

Bill Parcells
01-01-2008, 09:27 PM
I believe Coyotes are native to North America.

You can try setting up a sound system that plays Mountain Lion noises. I've read that works in some situations. If the Mountain Lion soundtrack does not work, record the sound of antifreeze glug-glugging out of a bottle and into a dish.
I meant to say that they were introduced into New Jersey to control the huge deer population here that has nowhere to go.

CrazyPhuD
01-01-2008, 09:47 PM
Well on a more serious note here's a couple articles on trapping. Depends upon home much space you have an local regs, but odds are good if you kill one of the pack on your property the rest will stay away for a while. Most animals tend to avoid areas where their kind has been killed.

http://mdc.mo.gov/landown/wild/nuisance/coyotes/traps.htm

http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/library/wldlf2/C660.pdf

jAZ
01-01-2008, 09:54 PM
Am I the only one who entered this thread wondering why Croyle was buying your goat?

cdcox
01-01-2008, 09:59 PM
Please tell my your goat is Paul Hackett.

Skip Towne
01-01-2008, 10:15 PM
We have a Great Pyrenees. He will not leave the herd of cattle for nothing, it is truly amazing how these dogs work.
It is inbred in them. They were bred to be sheep dogs. No training needed. Put a Pyrenees in with your herd and he/she will adopt them as their own. They are also very gentle with people and wonderful friends to have.

smittysbar
01-01-2008, 10:36 PM
It is inbred in them. They were bred to be sheep dogs. No training needed. Put a Pyrenees in with your herd and he/she will adopt them as their own. They are also very gentle with people and wonderful friends to have.

Yes your right. No training necessary. And great with the family. But you have to go see him cause he ain't leaving his post lol

Skip Towne
01-01-2008, 11:27 PM
Yes your right. No training necessary. And great with the family. But you have to go see him cause he ain't leaving his post lol
Yeah mostly. But Duke became a part of the family. He would come up to the house when he saw us drive in. (only about 100 yards from the barn) We loved that dog but he was getting old so we bought him two Pyrenee pups to train. Those pups got to 80 lbs in a year. I really miss those times.

Ugly Duck
01-02-2008, 12:06 AM
In this neck of the woods we use Great Pyrenees or llamas. Them llamas is huge & don't take no shit from coyotes messin with their flock.

Using llamas as sheep guards in North America began in the early 1980s and some sheep producers have used llamas successfully for that entire time. The use of guard llamas has greatly increased since a magazine article in 1990, when national attention was drawn to the potential use of llamas for guarding sheep.

Llamas have proven to be very effective against canines, especially dogs and coyotes. Over half of the llamas guarding sheep are 100% effective, completely eliminating losses. Many of these producers previously suffered losses of over a hundred lambs per year. Some have not suffered a loss to predators in two to ten years after purchasing guard llamas. An additional 40-45% of the guard llamas were highly effective in dramatically reducing predator losses. Only 5-10% of the guards were ineffective.

http://whyllama.com/Guard%20Llama.htm

smittysbar
01-02-2008, 12:16 AM
In this neck of the woods we use Great Pyrenees or llamas. Them llamas is huge & don't take no shit from coyotes messin with their flock.

Using llamas as sheep guards in North America began in the early 1980s and some sheep producers have used llamas successfully for that entire time. The use of guard llamas has greatly increased since a magazine article in 1990, when national attention was drawn to the potential use of llamas for guarding sheep.

Llamas have proven to be very effective against canines, especially dogs and coyotes. Over half of the llamas guarding sheep are 100% effective, completely eliminating losses. Many of these producers previously suffered losses of over a hundred lambs per year. Some have not suffered a loss to predators in two to ten years after purchasing guard llamas. An additional 40-45% of the guard llamas were highly effective in dramatically reducing predator losses. Only 5-10% of the guards were ineffective.

http://whyllama.com/Guard%20Llama.htm

Thats Interesting