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View Full Version : MSNBC calling Iowa caucus win for Huck


memyselfI
01-03-2008, 08:01 PM
No surprise, IMO.

WoodDraw
01-03-2008, 08:01 PM
CNN called it too

Ultra Peanut
01-03-2008, 08:02 PM
Way to go, Mitt!!!!!!!

dirk digler
01-03-2008, 08:02 PM
LMAO

Poor patteeu :deevee:

Cochise
01-03-2008, 08:08 PM
Like I was saying earlier, I think he's going to win by a much wider margin than people expect.

But let's not go Zogby here... I'll wait for things to shape up more before I look over the results.

Coach
01-03-2008, 08:10 PM
It's a 3 way race for the Dems in Iowa thus far.

Sully
01-03-2008, 08:12 PM
Kotter called it...


...I think...

Ultra Peanut
01-03-2008, 08:17 PM
Huckamania is runnin' wild, brother!!!!!!

Cochise
01-03-2008, 08:20 PM
Huckamania is runnin' wild, brother!!!!!!

take your vitamins, and say your prayers... or something...

Ultra Peanut
01-03-2008, 08:23 PM
Huckabee: WHATCHA GONNA DOOOO, MITT, WHEN HUCKAMANIA GOES DOWN ON YOUUUUUU

McCain: TEAR DOWN THE COCKPIT DOOR, MIKE. HUCKABEE.

memyselfI
01-03-2008, 08:24 PM
Kotter called it...


...I think...

I did too.

'Hamas' Jenkins
01-03-2008, 08:27 PM
Wow, McCain shit his pants in Iowa. His performance is embarrassing.

Sully
01-03-2008, 08:36 PM
I did too.
That's not nearly as funny as my joke.

:p

Ultra Peanut
01-03-2008, 08:38 PM
Wow, McCain shit his pants in Iowa. His performance is embarrassing.McCain wasn't going to win Iowa. New Hampshire is his Alamo.

'Hamas' Jenkins
01-03-2008, 08:39 PM
McCain wasn't going to win Iowa. New Hampshire is his Alamo.

He should have gotten around 20%, though

Jenson71
01-03-2008, 09:04 PM
I'm surprised by Huckabee winning by this much.

Jenson71
01-03-2008, 09:05 PM
He should have gotten around 20%, though

Yeah, I don't think he's going to be happy coming behind Thompson.

tk13
01-03-2008, 09:48 PM
Having Chuck Norris staring in the background behind Huckabee might make this the most intimidating political speech ever.

jAZ
01-03-2008, 09:50 PM
He should have gotten around 20%, though
The media doesn't care about McCain expectations. He's gonna get endless slobber as long as he's running. It's why he can beat anyone if he makes the general.

Iowanian
01-03-2008, 09:59 PM
Having Chuck Norris staring in the background behind Huckabee might make this the most intimidating political speech ever.


Can you imagine if Chuck Norris had been standing behind Ronald Reagan during his "tear down this wall" speech.....and thendid a roundhouse kick to a wall of the cardboard brick-blocks that ruled daycares across the land at that time?

http://www.geekologie.com/2007/07/13/action-jeans.jpg

Cochise
01-03-2008, 10:10 PM
...and for the 9,000,000th time in recent history, evangelicals are underestimated.

patteeu
01-04-2008, 07:05 AM
Kotter called it...


...I think...

LMAO

patteeu
01-04-2008, 07:11 AM
Poor patteeu :deevee:

Ah, that's nice of you to think of me, but don't shed any tears. There are several Republicans I'll be comfortable supporting in the general election if Mitt Romney doesn't come back from this. Huckabee's not one of them, but I still don't expect him to be standing in the end so I'm not worried yet.

Baby Lee
01-04-2008, 07:36 AM
What the heck, applies here too. . . . Noonan on Huck
Everyone said Mike Huckabee was a big dope to leave Iowa Wednesday to fly to L.A. to be on Jay Leno, but did you see him on that thing? He got off a perfect line on why he's doing well against Romney: "People are looking for a presidential candidate who reminds them more of the guy they work with rather than the guy that laid them off." The studio audience loved him. And you know, in Iowa they watch "The Tonight Show" too.

Mr. Huckabee likes to head-fake people into thinking he's Gomer Pyle, but he's more like the barefoot boy of the green room. He's more James Carville than Jim Nabors.

What we have learned about Mr. Huckabee the past few months is that he's an ace entertainer with a warm, witty and compelling persona. He won with no money and little formal organization, with an evangelical network, with a folksy manner, and with the best guileless pose in modern politics. From the mail I have received the past month after criticizing him in this space, I would say his great power, the thing really pushing his supporters, is that they believe that what ails America and threatens its continued existence is not economic collapse or jihad, it is our culture.

They have been bruised and offended by the rigid, almost militant secularism and multiculturalism of the public schools; they reject those schools' squalor, in all senses of the word. They believe in God and family and America. They are populist: They don't admire billionaire CEOs, they admire husbands with two jobs who hold the family together for the sake of the kids; they don't need to see the triumph of supply-side thinking, they want to see that suffering woman down the street get the help she needs.

They believe that Mr. Huckabee, the minister who speaks their language, shares, down to the bone, their anxieties, concerns and beliefs. They fear that the other Republican candidates are caught up in a million smaller issues--taxing, spending, the global economy, Sunnis and Shia--and missing the central issue: again, our culture. They are populists who vote Republican, and as I have read their letters, I have felt nothing but respect.

But there are two problems. One is that while the presidency, as an office, can actually make real changes in the areas of economic and foreign policy, the federal government has a limited ability to change the culture of America. That is something conservatives used to know. Second, I'm sorry to say it is my sense that Mr. Huckabee is not so much leading a movement as riding a wave. One senses he brilliantly discerned and pursued an underserved part of the voting demographic, and went for it. Clever fellow. To me, the tipoff was "Don't Mormons believe that Jesus and the devil are brothers?"

Baby Lee
01-04-2008, 12:23 PM
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB119941386549366831.html

It's unlikely that Mr. Huckabee, as president, would be able to shepherd a federal marriage amendment through the House, the Senate and the state legislatures, but signing into law a cap-and-trade system ostensibly aimed at limiting global warming (something he has called a "moral issue") would be much easier. If he wanted to push protectionist "fair trade" policies and a greater federal government role in health care, a Democratic Congress would be more than willing to let him live out his faith on the taxpayers' dime.