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View Full Version : Food and Drink NFT: Apricot Chicken, especially for Fire Me Boy!


Simply Red
01-06-2008, 09:55 AM
3-4 skin on, bone-in chicken breasts
1/2 cup of soy sauce
1-small jar of Smuckers Apricot preserves
1-medium sized white or yellow onion diced small
1/2 cup of cooking sherry

Combine all ingredients excluding the chicken and whisk together.

top chicken, dust chicken with fresh cracked pepper.

Bake 325 for 1 hr. and 45 minutes or so.

IMPORTANT- leave skin on chicken! Important for flavor. Also, save juice to top rice.

****serve with bacon seasoned green beans and white rice.

Enjoy!

blueballs
01-06-2008, 10:03 AM
Don't fruit the chick

Pablo
01-06-2008, 10:06 AM
Don't fruit the chickHe's right. Real men baste their chicken in motor oil.

blueballs
01-06-2008, 10:08 AM
10W-30 the nipples

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 10:38 AM
Sounds good.

Simply Red
01-06-2008, 10:40 AM
Sounds good.
It is, make it all the time. Welcome back friend! :)

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 10:46 AM
It is, make it all the time. Welcome back friend! :)
Thanks!


My wife bought me a pressure cooker for Christmas... I been using the hell out of it.

Rice pilaf (with whole grain rice) in 25 minutes, and the stuff kicks ass!

Would go well with this...

1 tbsp. butter/oil
1 onion, chopped
2 c. whole grain brown rice (or wild rice)
3.5 c. chicken stock (I've been using my own, since I make it with the pressure cooker)
1 bay leaf
salt/pepper
1 c. peas/carrots, chopped/frozen
1/2 c. parmesan

Cook the onion in the oil until it begins to soften and add the rice and cook for about a minute. Add everything else but the peas/carrots and cheese and drizzle with oil.

After it's cooked (if you're using a pressure cooker, it's only about 20 minutes after it comes to high pressure), take off the heat and add the peas/carrots mix and the cheese, cover and let sit for about 10 minutes.

Pretty damn tasty!

Simply Red
01-06-2008, 10:58 AM
Thanks!


My wife bought me a pressure cooker for Christmas... I been using the hell out of it.

Rice pilaf (with whole grain rice) in 25 minutes, and the stuff kicks ass!

Would go well with this...

1 tbsp. butter/oil
1 onion, chopped
2 c. whole grain brown rice (or wild rice)
3.5 c. chicken stock (I've been using my own, since I make it with the pressure cooker)
1 bay leaf
salt/pepper
1 c. peas/carrots, chopped/frozen
1/2 c. parmesan

Cook the onion in the oil until it begins to soften and add the rice and cook for about a minute. Add everything else but the peas/carrots and cheese and drizzle with oil.

After it's cooked (if you're using a pressure cooker, it's only about 20 minutes after it comes to high pressure), take off the heat and add the peas/carrots mix and the cheese, cover and let sit for about 10 minutes.

Pretty damn tasty!
nice *whispers with envy*

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 11:03 AM
nice *whispers with envy*
I'm going to make some this afternoon with my homemade turkey stock.

Simply Red
01-06-2008, 11:06 AM
I'm going to make some this afternoon with my homemade turkey stock.
Yeah real stock makes a HUGE difference in most any ensemble.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 11:09 AM
Yeah real stock makes a HUGE difference in most any ensemble.
This is the first batch of stock I've made. Definitely going to start making my own more often.

xbarretx
01-06-2008, 11:13 AM
heres another good recipe

APPLE SPICED BRISKET

1 tbsp. flour
3 to 4 lb. beef brisket (first cut) flat half, boneless
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 c. apple juice
1/4 c. honey
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
1 tsp. ground ginger
1 tsp. ground nutmeg
2 tbsp. flour
1/4 c. raisins
1 apple, sliced

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Shake 1 tablespoon flour in a large size (14x20 inch) Reynolds Oven Cooking Bag and place in 13x9x2 inch baking pan. Prick brisket with fork on both sides; sprinkle with salt. Place brisket, fat side up, in bag.
Combine apple juice, honey and spices; pour over brisket. Close bag with nylon tie; make 6 half inch slits in top. Bake 2 to 2 1/2 hours or until tender.

In medium saucepan, dissolve 2 tablespoons flour in small amount of cooking liquid from bag. Stir in remaining cooking liquid, raisins and apple slices. Bring to a boil. Boil and stir 1-2 minutes to form light gravy. Thinly slice brisket diagonally across grain. Serve with apple raisin gravy. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

im going to try the chicken, thanks for the recipe :)

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 11:19 AM
heres another good recipe

APPLE SPICED BRISKET

1 tbsp. flour
3 to 4 lb. beef brisket (first cut) flat half, boneless
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 c. apple juice
1/4 c. honey
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
1 tsp. ground ginger
1 tsp. ground nutmeg
2 tbsp. flour
1/4 c. raisins
1 apple, sliced

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Shake 1 tablespoon flour in a large size (14x20 inch) Reynolds Oven Cooking Bag and place in 13x9x2 inch baking pan. Prick brisket with fork on both sides; sprinkle with salt. Place brisket, fat side up, in bag.
Combine apple juice, honey and spices; pour over brisket. Close bag with nylon tie; make 6 half inch slits in top. Bake 2 to 2 1/2 hours or until tender.

In medium saucepan, dissolve 2 tablespoons flour in small amount of cooking liquid from bag. Stir in remaining cooking liquid, raisins and apple slices. Bring to a boil. Boil and stir 1-2 minutes to form light gravy. Thinly slice brisket diagonally across grain. Serve with apple raisin gravy. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

im going to try the chicken, thanks for the recipe :)


Unless you're making bread, your oven doesn't need to be on.

:harumph:

cdcox
01-06-2008, 11:20 AM
This is the first batch of stock I've made. Definitely going to start making my own more often.

I keep about a half gallon of stock in my freezer at all times. Right now it is duck stock. I usually use Swanson chicken broth, and save the homemade stock for when I want to go all out.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 11:22 AM
I keep about a half gallon of stock in my freezer at all times. Right now it is duck stock. I usually use Swanson chicken broth, and save the homemade stock for when I want to go all out.
Do you go the long way or do you use a pressure cooker on the stock?

I made one batch of the turkey stock and froze about half of it... will probably start cutting up my own chickens and saving the bones. Normally I just buy the already cut up chicken to save me some time... of course, I have a $200 Japanese cleaver that never gets any use.

cdcox
01-06-2008, 11:28 AM
Do you go the long way or do you use a pressure cooker on the stock?

I made one batch of the turkey stock and froze about half of it... will probably start cutting up my own chickens and saving the bones. Normally I just buy the already cut up chicken to save me some time... of course, I have a $200 Japanese cleaver that never gets any use.

Long way. My pressure cooker is only like 4 quart capacity.

If you have the time, brown the stock veggies and bones in a 400 degree oven before adding them to the stock pot. It makes a brown stock that has extra richness.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 11:29 AM
Long way. My pressure cooker is only like 4 quart capacity.

If you have the time, brown the stock veggies and bones in a 400 degree oven before adding them to the stock pot. It makes a brown stock that has extra richness.
I'll try that.

On my wish list for Christmas I had specifically asked for a 6-quart. That's what I got.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 12:08 PM
I'll try that.

On my wish list for Christmas I had specifically asked for a 6-quart. That's what I got.
Also been playing with these:

http://img404.imageshack.us/img404/513/img1470cg9.th.jpg (http://img404.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img1470cg9.jpg)

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 12:11 PM
The five on the left are Japanese hand-made (left-handed, too, for the single-beveled). The two on the right are also Japanese -- a Nakiri and Gyoto, both by Tojiro.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 12:19 PM
If you look on the full-size image, you can see the hammer marks on the three left knives. They are beautifully balanced and feel wonderful in the hand.

cdcox
01-06-2008, 12:26 PM
I love knives, but have a hard time justifying buying more.

I have a 5.5" Wusthof Santoku knife and a Henckels paring knife and that is all I ever use. If I were to add a knife, it would be some kind of meat carving knife, but the Santoku even works for that.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 12:31 PM
I love knives, but have a hard time justifying buying more.

I have a 5.5" Wusthof Santoku knife and a Henckels paring knife and that is all I ever use. If I were to add a knife, it would be some kind of meat carving knife, but the Santoku even works for that.
Check out www.japanesechefsknife.com or www.watanabeblade.com/english/.

Seriously, if you like your Wusthoff or Henckels, you'll LOVE the Japanese knives.

The German knives (or any Western style) is set on a 22.5 degree angle on each side and use a steel with about 55-58 on the Rockwell hardness scale. Japanese knives go a shallower angle (10 degrees on each side). To keep them from dulling faster, they use a harder steel (usually 62-64).

The lesser angle on the knife, obviously, makes it so the Japanese knives can get sharper than any Western style knife.

If you're looking for a boning knife, look for a honesuki. If you really like the Western knives, look for a Calphalon Katana Series honesuki. The Katana Series is making a lot of Japanese blades with the western edge.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 12:32 PM
I'm a knife addict.

And I'm telling you cd, if you buy ONE truly Japanese-made blade, you'll never go back.

I was happy with all the knives I had until my brother bought me a Tojiro for Christmas a few years ago. I've slowly been replacing all my knives since then and have not bought a Western-style blade since.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 12:38 PM
I love knives, but have a hard time justifying buying more.

I have a 5.5" Wusthof Santoku knife and a Henckels paring knife and that is all I ever use. If I were to add a knife, it would be some kind of meat carving knife, but the Santoku even works for that.
A 5.5" Santoku seems small for me. Not making a joke or anything, do you have fairly small hands?

If you have larger hands, you might like a larger 8-inch Gyoto better -- it's a traditional chef's knife. Typically, people with smaller hands prefer Santokus, while people with larger hands prefer the chef's knife.

But even if you like the Santoku, I think 5-5 is pretty small... 7-inch would be closer to my style.

cdcox
01-06-2008, 12:40 PM
Potato soup in the pressure cooker:

Chop some onion and celery and dice Russet potatos. Keep everything in proportion depending on the size of your cooker. Cover with chicken broth and pressure cook for 5 minutes once it comes to full pressure.

Pour half of the potatoes and broth into a food processor and puree. Add the puree back to the broth. Add enough milk to get the consitency you're looking for boil uncovered for a couple of minutes.

Now you can finish this soup in different ways:

1. For my wife and daughter, I add some sheadded cheddar cheese.

A couple of lower fat options:

2. A little smoked ham

3. Turkey Italian sausage (cooked) and a little parmesean cheese.

I preferred the ham.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 12:43 PM
Potato soup in the pressure cooker:

Chop some onion and celery and dice Russet potatos. Keep everything in proportion depending on the size of your cooker. Cover with chicken broth and pressure cook for 5 minutes once it comes to full pressure.

Pour half of the potatoes and broth into a food processor and puree. Add the puree back to the broth. Add enough milk to get the consitency you're looking for boil uncovered for a couple of minutes.

Now you can finish this soup in different ways:

1. For my wife and daughter, I add some sheadded cheddar cheese.

A couple of lower fat options:

2. A little smoked ham

3. Turkey Italian sausage (cooked) and a little parmesean cheese.

I preferred the ham.
The ham in that sounds very good! I'm not a fan of Italian sausage -- can't stand caraway.

cdcox
01-06-2008, 12:53 PM
I've never used a Japanese knife before. But you've got me curious, so I'll have to put one on my Christmas list next year.

I also have a Henckels 8" Chef. I hardly ever use it because 1) it needs sharpening and 2) I much prefer the Santoku. The thing about the Santoku is that with the flat cutting edge, it works "bigger" than an equivalent length knife with an arced edge (such as a Chef).

My hands are on the small size. Also, I get a little careless from time to time (one trip to the emergency room a few years ago and a near miss last week) and I seem to do better with a shorter blade.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 12:59 PM
I've never used a Japanese knife before. But you've got me curious, so I'll have to put one on my Christmas list next year.

I also have a Henckels 8" Chef. I hardly ever use it because 1) it needs sharpening and 2) I much prefer the Santoku. The thing about the Santoku is that with the flat cutting edge, it works "bigger" than an equivalent length knife with an arced edge (such as a Chef).

My hands are on the small size. Also, I get a little careless from time to time (one trip to the emergency room a few years ago and a near miss last week) and I seem to do better with a shorter blade.
ROFL

I've been there!

My gyoto (far right in the pic) is an 8-inch... I love that thing. The santoku (far left in the pic) is about 6.5 inches.

The long, slender blade (1 from left) is a single-bevel for thin-slicing meat/fish, followed by the small fish knife, the Japanese paring knife and two nakiri's. The nakiri is a vegetable knife, and nothing beats that thing for chopping an onion.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 01:01 PM
I've never used a Japanese knife before. But you've got me curious, so I'll have to put one on my Christmas list next year.

I also have a Henckels 8" Chef. I hardly ever use it because 1) it needs sharpening and 2) I much prefer the Santoku. The thing about the Santoku is that with the flat cutting edge, it works "bigger" than an equivalent length knife with an arced edge (such as a Chef).

My hands are on the small size. Also, I get a little careless from time to time (one trip to the emergency room a few years ago and a near miss last week) and I seem to do better with a shorter blade.
I actually prefer the chef's knife to the santoku because of the arced edge. The first time I used one of my new knifes I sliced the tip off my finger... took about 30 seconds to even START bleeding. Then... it didn't stop for about 25 minutes.

xbarretx
01-06-2008, 01:45 PM
Unless you're making bread, your oven doesn't need to be on.

:harumph:

its not BBQ, its either oven or crcok pot :thumb: this recipe i make in the crock pot silly goose ;)

Simply Red
01-06-2008, 01:56 PM
about to fire some of the apricot chicken now. Regarding potato soup; I made a good one New Years day, Baked off some red new pots. Chilled and sliced added to the creamy cheese soup. Finished with chives. Ohh and I like to use ham-base when establishing the soup's base.

RJ
01-06-2008, 01:58 PM
I've never used a Japanese knife before. But you've got me curious, so I'll have to put one on my Christmas list next year.

I also have a Henckels 8" Chef. I hardly ever use it because 1) it needs sharpening and 2) I much prefer the Santoku. The thing about the Santoku is that with the flat cutting edge, it works "bigger" than an equivalent length knife with an arced edge (such as a Chef).

My hands are on the small size. Also, I get a little careless from time to time (one trip to the emergency room a few years ago and a near miss last week) and I seem to do better with a shorter blade.



I have a great set of Henckels, well worth the investment. I mostly use the 8" chef and a small 4" utility knife. My wife uses the paring knife for everything, it is a great tool. I thought I would use the 5" and 7" santoku more than I do, I guess I'm just used to the shape of the chefs knife.

Count me among the knife junkies here. I don't need any more but I always find myself looking at them.

Fire Me Boy!
01-06-2008, 02:27 PM
I have a great set of Henckels, well worth the investment. I mostly use the 8" chef and a small 4" utility knife. My wife uses the paring knife for everything, it is a great tool. I thought I would use the 5" and 7" santoku more than I do, I guess I'm just used to the shape of the chefs knife.

Count me among the knife junkies here. I don't need any more but I always find myself looking at them.
Japanese knives are like black men... you'll never go back.

Fire Me Boy!
01-07-2008, 06:29 PM
Good Eats tonight Alton goes over knives.

I'm such a geek.

Demonpenz
01-07-2008, 06:30 PM
how is this not safe for work?

Fire Me Boy!
01-07-2008, 06:32 PM
how is this not safe for work?
Non Football Topic.

Not NSFW.

StcChief
01-07-2008, 06:33 PM
Real men... don't fruit the Chicken

Simply Red
01-07-2008, 06:47 PM
Real men... don't fruit the Chicken
THTOP IT!

cdcox
01-12-2008, 04:19 PM
3-4 skin on, bone-in chicken breasts
1/2 cup of soy sauce
1-small jar of Smuckers Apricot preserves
1-medium sized white or yellow onion diced small
1/2 cup of cooking sherry

Combine all ingredients excluding the chicken and whisk together.

top chicken, dust chicken with fresh cracked pepper.

Bake 325 for 1 hr. and 45 minutes or so.

IMPORTANT- leave skin on chicken! Important for flavor. Also, save juice to top rice.

****serve with bacon seasoned green beans and white rice.

Enjoy!

Just put it in the oven.

cdcox
01-12-2008, 05:49 PM
Thanks!


My wife bought me a pressure cooker for Christmas... I been using the hell out of it.

Rice pilaf (with whole grain rice) in 25 minutes, and the stuff kicks ass!

Would go well with this...

1 tbsp. butter/oil
1 onion, chopped
2 c. whole grain brown rice (or wild rice)
3.5 c. chicken stock (I've been using my own, since I make it with the pressure cooker)
1 bay leaf
salt/pepper
1 c. peas/carrots, chopped/frozen
1/2 c. parmesan

Cook the onion in the oil until it begins to soften and add the rice and cook for about a minute. Add everything else but the peas/carrots and cheese and drizzle with oil.

After it's cooked (if you're using a pressure cooker, it's only about 20 minutes after it comes to high pressure), take off the heat and add the peas/carrots mix and the cheese, cover and let sit for about 10 minutes.

Pretty damn tasty!

In the pressure cooker now.

MTG#10
01-12-2008, 05:52 PM
Theres a lot of estrogen in this thread.

Simply Red
01-12-2008, 09:08 PM
Just put it in the oven.
Great!

Let me know how you like(d) it.

cdcox
01-12-2008, 09:34 PM
Great!

Let me know how you like(d) it.

Both the chicken and the rice came out great! I was a little skeptical about cooking the chicken that long, but it was moist and tender. Family liked it too.

The rice probably cooked too long since it stuck to the bottom of the pan. Nevertheless, the taste was perfect.

Fire Me Boy!
01-13-2008, 07:31 AM
Both the chicken and the rice came out great! I was a little skeptical about cooking the chicken that long, but it was moist and tender. Family liked it too.

The rice probably cooked too long since it stuck to the bottom of the pan. Nevertheless, the taste was perfect.
If it stuck, definitely cooked too long. Did you turn the heat down once it came to pressure? On rice, I have to turn my oven down to medium low.

Simply Red
01-13-2008, 08:40 AM
Both the chicken and the rice came out great! I was a little skeptical about cooking the chicken that long, but it was moist and tender. Family liked it too.

The rice probably cooked too long since it stuck to the bottom of the pan. Nevertheless, the taste was perfect.
Good deal.

BucEyedPea
01-13-2008, 09:02 AM
Theres a lot of estrogen in this thread.

Count me in! :D

Great recipes boys!

MTG#10
01-13-2008, 09:15 AM
Count me in! :D

Great recipes boys!

Im just messin around, some of those do look quite tasty. Unfortunately, I married a woman who couldnt cook anything to save her life so Im stuck with that responsibility.

When we first started dating she said she was going to make me spaghetti. I went into the kitchen to grab a beer and she was pouring vegetable oil in the pan "so the hamburger wouldnt stick". :doh!:

Coach
01-13-2008, 10:20 AM
Here's one.

Cheesy Chicken and Rice Casserole

1 Can (10 3/4 oz) Campbell's Cream of Chicken Soup
1 1/3 Cups of water
3/4 cup [i]uncooked[i/] white rice, or whole grain rice.
Sometimes a 1 cup of rice is better.
2 cups fresh or frozen vegetables, if needed
1/2 tsp. onion powder
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
1/2 cup reduced fat shredded Cheddar Cheese

1. Stir the soup, water, rice, vegetables, and onion powder in a 12"x8" shallow baking dish

2. Top with chicken. Season chicken as desired. Cover with aluminium foil.

3. Bake at 375 degrees for at least 45 mins IF using a white rice. An hour and 20 mins for whole grain rice.

4. When done, scatter cheese on top of the chicken, put foil back on and let it set for 5 mins.

Enjoy.

cdcox
01-13-2008, 10:59 AM
If it stuck, definitely cooked too long. Did you turn the heat down once it came to pressure? On rice, I have to turn my oven down to medium low.

Once it came to pressure, I had it a litte above medium. Next time I'll turn it down until is is barely keeping pressure up.

Fire Me Boy!
01-13-2008, 12:38 PM
Once it came to pressure, I had it a litte above medium. Next time I'll turn it down until is is barely keeping pressure up.
Glad you liked it, though! It's one of my favorite rice dishes to make now.

RJ
01-15-2008, 06:38 PM
SR, not that it matters cause it's already in the oven, but would you happen to know what size jar is a "small" jar of the preserves?

Simply Red
01-15-2008, 08:10 PM
SR, not that it matters cause it's already in the oven, but would you happen to know what size jar is a "small" jar of the preserves?
The smallest available. Maybe, 9,10 ounces. Don't recall; but, they (Smuckers) only offer two sizes to my knowledge. Hope it turns out good bud!

Simply Red
01-15-2008, 08:14 PM
SR, not that it matters cause it's already in the oven, but would you happen to know what size jar is a "small" jar of the preserves?
RJ,

Please give some feedback on the results. It's a great recipe w/ some practice. One trick I failed to mention is; Cook in a standard glass/metal baking dish for 45 minutes or so. I then transfer to a much smaller dish so the chicken will actually be marinating in the sauce/broth as it bakes.

|Zach|
01-15-2008, 08:53 PM
Sounds great.

RJ
01-15-2008, 09:53 PM
RJ,

Please give some feedback on the results. It's a great recipe w/ some practice. One trick I failed to mention is; Cook in a standard glass/metal baking dish for 45 minutes or so. I then transfer to a much smaller dish so the chicken will actually be marinating in the sauce/broth as it bakes.


Tasty stuff, SR, the wife liked it too. I'll make it again, though next time I'll use more apricot and less soy than what I did tonight. I don't usually like sweet but I will sweeten this dish up a bit. That's not a criticism, just a preference. I used Texmati rice and the nutty flavor blended really well with the sauce. The leftovers will be gone at lunch tomorrow. Thanks for posting, I appreciate it.

Simply Red
01-15-2008, 10:11 PM
Tasty stuff, SR, the wife liked it too. I'll make it again, though next time I'll use more apricot and less soy than what I did tonight. I don't usually like sweet but I will sweeten this dish up a bit. That's not a criticism, just a preference. I used Texmati rice and the nutty flavor blended really well with the sauce. The leftovers will be gone at lunch tomorrow. Thanks for posting, I appreciate it.
Very cool. Glad to hear. Follow my last left tip in the thread it'll increase the flavor in the chicken, alone. Thanks for givin` it a rip. Very cool, bud.

Simply Red
01-15-2008, 10:12 PM
Sounds great.
Give it a swing Zach. Very good stuff.

greg63
01-15-2008, 10:47 PM
3-4 skin on, bone-in chicken breasts
1/2 cup of soy sauce
1-small jar of Smuckers Apricot preserves
1-medium sized white or yellow onion diced small
1/2 cup of cooking sherry

Combine all ingredients excluding the chicken and whisk together.

top chicken, dust chicken with fresh cracked pepper.

Bake 325 for 1 hr. and 45 minutes or so.

IMPORTANT- leave skin on chicken! Important for flavor. Also, save juice to top rice.

****serve with bacon seasoned green beans and white rice.

Enjoy!

Sounds very good, and simple to put together. I saved it to a word document. :D

Bill Parcells
01-15-2008, 10:48 PM
Sounds very good, and simple to put together. I saved it to a word document. :D
Hey, look everybody. it's the thread killer!

How ya been?

greg63
01-15-2008, 10:59 PM
Hey, look everybody. it's the thread killer!

How ya been?

Heh! I do what I can.

Chiefmanwillcatch
01-15-2008, 11:19 PM
thats sounds good.

Simply Red
01-16-2008, 10:31 AM
thats sounds good.
give it a whirl. Love the username by the way. Much better than a gay eighties pop-band.

Simply Red
01-18-2008, 02:22 PM
Don't vary at all. Follow precisely. This is a money recipe... Trust me:

5# brisket
1.5 cans of beer
1/2 teaspoon of celery seed
1 tablespoon of garlic powder
1 teaspoon of liquid smoke
1 tablespoon of kosher salt



Proceedure:

Put brisket in baking dish
pour beer over brisk.
pour liq. smk over brisk.
dust roast with all remaining dry ingredients


Cover tightly with foil. Bake on 335 one hour per pound.
add 30 minutes at 300.
pull out and let rest for 20 minutes.
slice.
pour remaining juices in mixing bowl and whisk in favorite BBQ sauce(sauce will be fairly loose) poor over sliced meat return to oven
250 ten minutes or so.

Drizzle results lightly with pure bbq sauce.

Fire Me Boy!
01-18-2008, 03:01 PM
But.... it's got the oven AND liquid smoke.

Fire Me Boy!
01-18-2008, 03:02 PM
Speaking of liquid smoke... anyone ever made their own? I saw it Good Eats.

Simply Red
01-18-2008, 03:34 PM
Okay fine. Liquid smoke may not sound good. JUST TRY THIS ONE TIME EXACTLY HOW I LISTED IT. Just once. Then let me know what you think. Every ingredient is vital, so is the qty. mentioned and the procedure. Then get back with me.

Fire Me Boy!
01-18-2008, 03:46 PM
Okay fine. Liquid smoke may not sound good. JUST TRY THIS ONE TIME EXACTLY HOW I LISTED IT. Just once. Then let me know what you think. Every ingredient is vital, so is the qty. mentioned and the procedure. Then get back with me.
I may give it a shot this weekend. We'll see. I've been wanting brisket, but when it's this cold I can't get the smoker up hot enough without going through a ton of charcoal.

RJ
01-18-2008, 04:14 PM
Liquid smoke is great stuff when used properly (read: sparingly). Try mixing about a teaspoon with a half stick of melted butter and baste it on oven baked ribs or chicken. Works real well when you can't/won't fire up the grill.

Simply Red
01-18-2008, 04:17 PM
Liquid smoke is great stuff when used properly (read: sparingly). Try mixing about a teaspoon with a half stick of melted butter and baste it on oven baked ribs or chicken. Works real well when you can't/won't fire up the grill.
This is your next project, the above recipe. Serve w/ scalloped potatoes.

Simply Red
01-19-2008, 12:12 PM
I may give it a shot this weekend. We'll see. I've been wanting brisket, but when it's this cold I can't get the smoker up hot enough without going through a ton of charcoal.
:clap:

Fire Me Boy!
07-09-2008, 03:15 PM
OK SR. I think I'm gonna make this stuff on Saturday. Kinda want to do it tonight, but there won't be time once I get off work.

cdcox
07-09-2008, 03:24 PM
OK SR. I think I'm gonna make this stuff on Saturday. Kinda want to do it tonight, but there won't be time once I get off work.

Don't forget to leave the skin on.

And make sure the apricot preserves are Smuckers.

Stewie
07-09-2008, 03:31 PM
How do you "dust" with fresh cracked pepper?

Simply Red
07-09-2008, 03:35 PM
Like I said, start it for the first half an hour in a larger baking dish. Then transfer into much smaller one (where the bird will swim)
Turn back the heat, and let it go...

Serve w/ green beans and white rice. Pour a Cakebread Chardonnay and get SASSY!!

Simply Red
07-09-2008, 03:36 PM
Don't forget to leave the skin on.

And make sure the apricot preserves are Smuckers.

:cuss:

Logical
07-09-2008, 03:38 PM
3-4 skin on, bone-in chicken breasts
1/2 cup of soy sauce
1-small jar of Smuckers Apricot preserves
1-medium sized white or yellow onion diced small
1/2 cup of cooking sherry

Combine all ingredients excluding the chicken and whisk together.

top chicken, dust chicken with fresh cracked pepper.

Bake 325 for 1 hr. and 45 minutes or so.

IMPORTANT- leave skin on chicken! Important for flavor. Also, save juice to top rice.

****serve with bacon seasoned green beans and white rice.

Enjoy!This sounds good, thanks Red

Simply Red
07-09-2008, 03:44 PM
This sounds good, thanks Red

Try her out. It's very scrumptous actually.

Simply Red
07-09-2008, 03:45 PM
How do you "dust" with fresh cracked pepper?

sprinkle, grind on top of. Whichever terminology you prefer but; PUT THAT SHIT ON TOP!

Friendo
07-09-2008, 04:16 PM
try wrapping those (fresh) green beans with a strip of bacon-secure w/toothpick and bake in the oven.

Simply Red
07-10-2008, 11:58 AM
try wrapping those (fresh) green beans with a strip of bacon-secure w/toothpick and bake in the oven.

sounds good too.

aturnis
01-21-2009, 05:34 PM
Your bone in breasts must be MUCH smaller than those sold here in Iowa at the Fareway meat dept. I am making the Apricot Chicken, but the idea that these could possibly be place in a smaller dish than the standard baking dish is obsurd...these things are huge. I think their all over 1.5# each.

Also, I'm making the bacon wrapped green beans Friendo suggested. Here's the recipe I'm using:

Green Bean Bundles

3 cans whole green beans
1 1/2 cup brown sugar
2 tsp. garlic powder
1 stick butter or margarine
15 to 18 slices of bacon, slightly cooked

Melt butter, sugar and garlic powder to make a paste. Gather 13 to 15 green beans for each bundle. Wrap each bundle with a slice of bacon and secure with toothpick. Top with 1 tablespoon of paste. Place bundles in 9 x 13 pan and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

Though I will probably cook them for 45min. at 325 beings that is what my oven will already be set at.

Sounds good, I'll let you all know how everything turns out. Thanks.

Extra Point
01-21-2009, 06:45 PM
Have been doing a lot of apricot preserve glazes for smoked whole turkeys and ribs the last few months. Good stuff.

Simply Red
06-28-2010, 12:44 PM
this needed some more lovin' ...

RJ
06-28-2010, 12:49 PM
Ain't it funny how time slips away?

Simply Red
06-28-2010, 12:54 PM
Ain't it funny how time slips away?

yeah, no doubt, @ least it'll be tender though. ;) -- seriously, yes, yes it is. This seems like 6-mos. ago. :headshake:

Fire Me Boy!
06-28-2010, 01:27 PM
:facepalm:

crispystl420
06-28-2010, 05:31 PM
I actually prefer the chef's knife to the santoku because of the arced edge. The first time I used one of my new knifes I sliced the tip off my finger... took about 30 seconds to even START bleeding. Then... it didn't stop for about 25 minutes.

Yeah, I prefer a chef's knife because I prefer to rock it rather than chop it.

Gadzooks
06-28-2010, 08:32 PM
:facepalm:

Good night sweet prince. you will be missed.