PDA

View Full Version : Americans Fire Missiles Into Somalia


Bill Parcells
03-03-2008, 06:56 PM
NAIROBI, Kenya — American naval forces fired missiles into southern Somalia on Monday, aiming at what the Defense Department called terrorist targets.

Residents reached by telephone said the only casualties were three wounded civilians, three dead cows, one dead donkey and a partly destroyed house.

Bryan Whitman, a Pentagon spokesman in Washington, said the target was a “known Al Qaeda terrorist,” and another American military official said the attack was carried out with at least two Tomahawk cruise missiles fired from a submarine. The official said the missiles were believed to have hit their targets, but did not elaborate on the targets.

Witnesses on the ground, though, described the attack differently.

“I did not know from where they were launched, but what I know is that they hit a house in this town,” said Mohammed Amin Abdullahi Osman, a resident of Dhobley, a small town in southern Somalia near the Kenyan border.

Mr. Mohammed said two missiles crashed into the house around 3:30 a.m.

It was not the first time that American forces fired missiles into Somalia in pursuit of what the Pentagon has called terrorist operatives in the country. They did so at least three times last year.

Dhobley lies in the growing swath of southern Somalia that seems to be falling under the control of the country’s Islamist movement once again. The Islamists rose to power in 2006 and brought a degree of law and order to Somalia for the first time since the central government collapsed in 1991.

But they were driven out of Somalia in late 2006 and early 2007 by a joint Ethiopian-American offensive. The Americans and Ethiopians suspected Somalia’s Islamists of harboring Qaeda terrorists, including men connected to the bombings of the American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998. Thousands of Ethiopian troops poured across the border, backed up by American airstrikes and American intelligence. The Islamist movement then went underground.

But in the past several months, the Islamists seem to be making a comeback, taking over towns in southern Somalia, including Dhobley, and inflicting a steady stream of casualties on Ethiopian forces with suicide bombs and hit-and-run attacks. Efforts by foreign diplomats and the United Nations to broker a truce have failed, and concerns are rising that Somalia could be headed toward another war-induced famine like the one it suffered in the early 1990s.

Jeffrey Gettleman reported from Nairobi, and Eric Schmitt from Washington. Mohammed Ibrahim contributed reporting from Mogadishu, Somalia.

link (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/04/world/africa/04somalia.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin)

a1na2
03-03-2008, 08:34 PM
link (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/04/world/africa/04somalia.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin)

If someone shot a missile up your cows butt you might have a different opinion than those that fired the missile.

How many people in prison are guilty? We on the outside feel that a very large percentage of them are. Those on the inside feel that they were hosed and are innocent.

My perception of the attack is that there was probably some reasonably good intelligence that a substantial target was present and was in desperate need of getting greased. IF there were innocent people killed that's a bad thing, but if those innocent people were hanging out with a terrorist it might have been a good conclusion that they were also terrorists.

I have no real clue as to who may have been in the house; I doubt that anyone but those that were doing the recon on the target were sure.

elvomito
03-03-2008, 09:50 PM
How many people in prison are guilty? We on the outside feel that a very large percentage of them are. Those on the inside feel that they were hosed and are innocent.
but if those innocent people were hanging out with a terrorist it might have been a good conclusion that they were also terrorists.

that made me think of something... are military personnel more honorable than the feds back home? what i'm talkin about is how the dea etc is scum, and will latch on to anyone they want and attempt to convict at all cost... surely the military command is honorable in their choice of target, right? i'd hate to think of them as similar to the dea but with bigger toys

a1na2
03-03-2008, 10:01 PM
that made me think of something... are military personnel more honorable than the feds back home? what i'm talkin about is how the dea etc is scum, and will latch on to anyone they want and attempt to convict at all cost... surely the military command is honorable in their choice of target, right? i'd hate to think of them as similar to the dea but with bigger toys

I don't know what the link up between the Navy and those that needed the shots fired.

If you were to listen to many people on this board the military is nothing but a bunch of Slave owners (see posts by TJ). He would refuse to enter the military because of a defective government. I don't know where he would run, but that seems to be his goal in life, not to defend the freedoms of America.

The military, IMO, is an honorable group. As with any group there are those that bend the rules. I have no doubt that there are many honorable people that work for government agencies, I also feel that there is a higher percentage of unhonorable in some of those lesser regulated government agancies. Sometimes there is no way to oversee some of the covert activities when their basic premise is of secrecy. The only secrets we have in the military are those that concern our capabilities and the known capabilities of our enemies.

patteeu
03-04-2008, 06:30 AM
It's good to hear that we continue to be vigilant in this global war. As we make places like Iraq and Afghanistan less hospitable to our enemies, we'll have to keep them from setting up shop in other remote areas. I suspect that that's a big part of why we've increased aid to Africa so much during the Bush administration. It's not purely altruistic, and that's a good thing, IMO.

Iowanian
03-04-2008, 08:20 AM
Rest in Pieces.