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"Bob" Dobbs
03-09-2008, 01:22 AM
I'm not sure what the whole reasoning behind DST is, nor do I give a ****, but I'm stuck having to remote into 17 different PC's just to make damn sure they actually spring forward. 90% of them jumped just fine, BTW, but a few didn't, and I don't know why. There. I'm done bitching now.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 08:52 AM
DST=Daylight Saving Time. Energy conservation. Welcome to 5th grade...

milkman
03-09-2008, 08:57 AM
DST=Daylight Saving Time. Energy conservation. Welcome to 5th grade...

You know what I'd like to know?

WTF isn't saving energy important year round?

What is the ****ing point?

Just leave the clock at DST year round.

**** time changes.

HonestChieffan
03-09-2008, 08:59 AM
Save energy so you can waste it when we change back.

kstater
03-09-2008, 09:00 AM
You know what I'd like to know?

WTF isn't saving energy important year round?

What is the ****ing point?

Just leave the clock at DST year round.

**** time changes.

Something to do with the whole Earth orbiting thing. Somehow the amount of daylight we receive changes throughout the year.

milkman
03-09-2008, 09:05 AM
Something to do with the whole Earth orbiting thing. Somehow the amount of daylight we receive changes throughout the year.

Yeah, so because of the earth orbiting thing, the sun would go down at at 4:30 standard time or 4:30 DST, so it doesn't matter?

I didn't think so.

Leave the ****ing clock at DST.

Guru
03-09-2008, 09:36 AM
Yeah, so because of the earth orbiting thing, the sun would go down at at 4:30 standard time or 4:30 DST, so it doesn't matter?

I didn't think so.

Leave the ****ing clock at DST.
Amen to that. I can't stand the time changes.

chief52
03-09-2008, 09:39 AM
I guess the only way to beat DLS time is to move to Arizona. They are the only state smart enough to leave the clock alone all year. They never change.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 09:46 AM
You know what I'd like to know?

WTF isn't saving energy important year round?

What is the ****ing point?

Just leave the clock at DST year round.

**** time changes.I agree, it really shouldn't matter. I don't see why they can't just leave it at DST. I don't care either way. The only clock I have to change is my alarm clock.

milkman
03-09-2008, 09:58 AM
I agree, it really shouldn't matter. I don't see why they can't just leave it at DST. I don't care either way. The only clock I have to change is my alarm clock.

I don't even care about having to change the clocks.

That first week after the change ****s up my whole sleep cycle.

Bearcat
03-09-2008, 10:00 AM
I flew back from London the day after they fell back in October, and then we fell back the next week. It's nerdishly cool to have lived an hour longer than the vast majority on the world for that one week. :)

chief52
03-09-2008, 10:04 AM
Did not realize it, but the US actually did go to DLS time full time for 2 years.

1973 - An oil embargo by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries led Congress to enact a test period of year-round daylight-saving time in 1974 and 1975. The test period was controversial; it ended after complaints that the dark winter mornings endangered children traveling to school. The U.S. returned to summer daylight-saving time in 1975.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/studentnews/03/06/one.sheet.daylight.saving/

ArrowheadHawk
03-09-2008, 10:05 AM
I flew back from London the day after they fell back in October, and then we fell back the next week. It's nerdishly cool to have lived an hour longer than the vast majority on the world for that one week. :):doh!:

DaFace
03-09-2008, 10:10 AM
I'm not sure what the whole reasoning behind DST is, nor do I give a ****, but I'm stuck having to remote into 17 different PC's just to make damn sure they actually spring forward. 90% of them jumped just fine, BTW, but a few didn't, and I don't know why. There. I'm done bitching now.

If they are Windows-based computers, they probably don't have the DST patch applied from last year. They'll probably change times in a couple weeks on you, so be on the lookout for that.

DaFace
03-09-2008, 10:17 AM
DST=Daylight Saving Time. Energy conservation. Welcome to 5th grade...

Or does it?

http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB120406767043794825-UOLcfJA8x9Gw9ozbCz77MiLmtaE_20080327.html?mod=tff_main_tff_top

Daylight Saving Wastes Energy, Study Says
By JUSTIN LAHART
February 27, 2008; Page D1

For decades, conventional wisdom has held that daylight-saving time, which begins March 9, reduces energy use. But a unique situation in Indiana provides evidence challenging that view: Springing forward may actually waste energy.

Up until two years ago, only 15 of Indiana's 92 counties set their clocks an hour ahead in the spring and an hour back in the fall. The rest stayed on standard time all year, in part because farmers resisted the prospect of having to work an extra hour in the morning dark. But many residents came to hate falling in and out of sync with businesses and residents in neighboring states and prevailed upon the Indiana Legislature to put the entire state on daylight-saving time beginning in the spring of 2006.

Indiana's change of heart gave University of California-Santa Barbara economics professor Matthew Kotchen and Ph.D. student Laura Grant a unique way to see how the time shift affects energy use. Using more than seven million monthly meter readings from Duke Energy Corp., covering nearly all the households in southern Indiana for three years, they were able to compare energy consumption before and after counties began observing daylight-saving time. Readings from counties that had already adopted daylight-saving time provided a control group that helped them to adjust for changes in weather from one year to the next.

Their finding: Having the entire state switch to daylight-saving time each year, rather than stay on standard time, costs Indiana households an additional $8.6 million in electricity bills. They conclude that the reduced cost of lighting in afternoons during daylight-saving time is more than offset by the higher air-conditioning costs on hot afternoons and increased heating costs on cool mornings.

"I've never had a paper with such a clear and unambiguous finding as this," says Mr. Kotchen, who presented the paper at a National Bureau of Economic Research conference this month.

A 2007 study by economists Hendrik Wolff and Ryan Kellogg of the temporary extension of daylight-saving in two Australian territories for the 2000 Summer Olympics also suggested the clock change increases energy use.

That isn't what Benjamin Franklin would have expected. In 1784, he observed what an "immense sum! that the city of Paris might save every year, by the economy of using sunshine instead of candles." (Mr. Franklin didn't propose setting clocks forward, instead he satirically suggested levying a tax on window shutters, ringing church bells at sunrise and, if that didn't work, firing cannons down the street in order to rouse Parisians out of their beds earlier.)

During the first and second world wars, the U.S. temporarily enacted daylight-saving time as an energy-saving measure. Over time, most states began changing their clocks, and in response to the 1973 oil shock, the country extended daylight-saving time in 1974 and 1975. Analyzing that time shift, a 1975 report by the U.S. Department of Transportation concluded that the change reduced electricity demand by 1% in March and April. But in a 1976 report to Congress evaluating that analysis, the National Bureau of Standards concluded that there were no significant energy savings.

Still, the Transportation Department study stuck. Speaking before the House of Representatives in 2002, Indiana Rep. Julia Carson said that under daylight-saving time, Indiana families would save "over $7 million annually in electricity rates alone."

In 2005, Reps. Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts and Fred Upton of Michigan drafted legislation that would extend daylight-saving time nationwide. Congress approved the amendment, which called for clocks to be sprung forward three weeks earlier in the spring and one week later in the fall. The change went into effect last year.

The energy-savings numbers often cited by lawmakers and others come from research conducted in the 1970s. Yet a key difference between now and the '70s -- or, for that matter, Ben Franklin's time -- is the prevalence of air conditioning.

"In an inland state like Indiana, it gets hot in the summer," says Steve Gustafsen, a lawyer in New Albany, Ind., who filed a suit in 2000 in an effort to get his county to abandon daylight-saving time. "Daylight saving means running the air conditioner more."

That was borne out by the study by Mr. Kotchen and Ms. Grant. Their research showed that while an extra hour of daylight in the evenings may mean less electricity is spent on lights, it also means that houses are warmer in the summer when people come home from work. Conversely, during daylight-saving time's cooler months, people may crank up the thermostats more in the morning.

Still, the case on daylight-saving time isn't closed.

"My read on this study is that it's one data point that gives us something to think about," says Richard Stevie, an economist with Duke Energy, of Mr. Kotchen and Ms. Grant's research. "I think that additional research really needs to be done." And UCLA economist Matthew Kahn points out that even if the evidence on Indiana is airtight, the effect of daylight-saving time on other states might be different -- a point that Mr. Markey makes as well.

"One study of the situation in Indiana cannot accurately asses the impact of [daylight-saving time] changes across the nation, especially when it does not include more northern, colder regions," the congressman notes.

There may also be social benefits to daylight-saving time that weren't covered in the research. When the extension of daylight-saving time was proposed by Mr. Markey, he cited studies that noted "less crime, fewer traffic fatalities, more recreation time and increased economic activity" with the extra sunlight in the evening.

In Indiana, the debate goes on. "The simpler the issue, the more people have opinions about it," says Indiana State Rep. Scott Reske, who voted against the switch to daylight-saving time. In the aftermath of the time shift, "a lot of people who hated it now love it, and a lot of people who loved it now hate it," he says. A separate debate over whether the state should be on Central or Eastern Time rages on.

milkman
03-09-2008, 10:18 AM
Did not realize it, but the US actually did go to DLS time full time for 2 years.

1973 - An oil embargo by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries led Congress to enact a test period of year-round daylight-saving time in 1974 and 1975. The test period was controversial; it ended after complaints that the dark winter mornings endangered children traveling to school. The U.S. returned to summer daylight-saving time in 1975.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/studentnews/03/06/one.sheet.daylight.saving/

We are sometimes a stupid ****ing society.

I was in school in those days, and I never felt endangered traveling to school in the darke.

And I walked uphill 10 miles in the snow both ways, to and from school.

philfree
03-09-2008, 10:19 AM
DST means more time for golf:clap:

PhilFree:arrow:

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 10:20 AM
I don't even care about having to change the clocks.

That first week after the change ****s up my whole sleep cycle.I never notice it.

Fish
03-09-2008, 10:33 AM
DST means more time for golf:clap:

PhilFree:arrow:


:toast:

That's really all I care about......

Chief Roundup
03-09-2008, 10:38 AM
DST=Daylight Saving Time. Energy conservation. Welcome to 5th grade...

If our goverment wanted to save energy. It would raise the SEER rating required for HVAC equipment in commercial buildings. But instead they are talking about raising the residential minimum again. And continuing to leave the commercial where it has been for the last couple of decades.

Frazod
03-09-2008, 10:49 AM
I don't even care about having to change the clocks.

That first week after the change ****s up my whole sleep cycle.

Fall doesn't bother me, but spring sucks ass. Now I'll feel like I'm getting up an hour early for the better part of a week. And it's not like I'm much of a morning person to begin with. :grr:

I agree, they should just pick one and stick with it.

OnTheWarpath58
03-09-2008, 10:53 AM
DST means more time for golf:clap:

PhilFree:arrow:

Damn right.

Teeing off at 2:30 today...plenty of time to get a round in.

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 10:53 AM
I don't even care about having to change the clocks.

That first week after the change ****s up my whole sleep cycle.

Great, I suppose that means you're going to be even grumpier than normal. :shake:

milkman
03-09-2008, 10:56 AM
Great, I suppose that means you're going to be even grumpier than normal. :shake:

WTH are you talking about?

I'm a freakin' ray of sunshine around here!

:evil:

beach tribe
03-09-2008, 10:58 AM
I have to go bartend an hour earlier today 3pm(it's alredy 1 here)

I feel like a fukin corpse.

MTG#10
03-09-2008, 11:26 AM
If we didnt have DST, after awhile (long while) Christmas would be in the summer, baseball would be in the winter, etc.

milkman
03-09-2008, 11:28 AM
If we didnt have DST, after awhile (long while) Christmas would be in the summer, baseball would be in the winter, etc.


I think you might be thinking of leap year.

DaFace
03-09-2008, 11:35 AM
If we didnt have DST, after awhile (long while) Christmas would be in the summer, baseball would be in the winter, etc.

¿Que? :spock:

beach tribe
03-09-2008, 11:40 AM
How does running you air conditoner longer save energy?

beach tribe
03-09-2008, 11:40 AM
If we didnt have DST, after awhile (long while) Christmas would be in the summer, baseball would be in the winter, etc.

W T F ?

chief52
03-09-2008, 11:41 AM
I think you might be thinking of leap year.

I think you are right... ROFL

beach tribe
03-09-2008, 11:42 AM
BWAAAAAHAAAAAAAAA

Guru
03-09-2008, 12:01 PM
How does running you air conditoner longer save energy?
exactly

headsnap
03-09-2008, 12:03 PM
If we didnt have DST, after awhile (long while) Christmas would be in the summer, baseball would be in the winter, etc.

ROFL

KcMizzou
03-09-2008, 12:05 PM
I want my hour of weekend back.

KcMizzou
03-09-2008, 12:05 PM
If we didnt have DST, after awhile (long while) Christmas would be in the summer, baseball would be in the winter, etc.Ms. South Carolina?

jjchieffan
03-09-2008, 12:13 PM
I really like DST. I grew up on a farm, and the extra hour of daylight helped. Now as a cable installer, it benefits me as well. Many times, I am still working at 6. Working outside in the dark just slows me down, so the extra hour of light helps me get done faster.

MTG#10
03-09-2008, 12:19 PM
Leap year? Yeah I thought that was what the thread was about. Sometimes I read one thing but something else registers. I blame it on the acid during my teenage years.

Ms. South Carolina?

Everywhere like such as the Iraq.

penguinz
03-09-2008, 12:47 PM
How does running you air conditoner longer save energy?
How does the time change make your A/C run longer?

Chief Roundup
03-09-2008, 01:23 PM
How does running you air conditoner longer save energy?

Air Conditioners are more energy efficent than Heating units!
The minimum A/C SEER rating is 13. The best Heating SEER rating is 9.

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 01:44 PM
How does the time change make your A/C run longer?
Heh, I'm eagerly awaiting the answer to that one. In fact, I'd like someone to expand on that and explain how the hell the time change has any effect on energy consumption whatsoever. There's still the same number of hours in the day, and the temperature outside is the same no matter wtf our clocks say.

Bowser
03-09-2008, 01:49 PM
I want my hour of sleep back.

Exactly.

Bowser
03-09-2008, 01:50 PM
Heh, I'm eagerly awaiting the answer to that one. In fact, I'd like someone to expand on that and explain how the hell the time change has any effect on energy consumption whatsoever. There's still the same number of hours in the day, and the temperature outside is the same no matter wtf our clocks say.

There are some questions that need not be asked. Watch out for the black helicopters and stretch limos rolling past your house.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 01:53 PM
How does the time change make your A/C run longer?It stays daylight longer in the evening, which is warmer than the morning.

Bowser
03-09-2008, 01:58 PM
It stays daylight longer in the evening, which is warmer than the morning.

Huh, interesting. I thought the fact that it's June through September did that.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 01:58 PM
Heh, I'm eagerly awaiting the answer to that one. In fact, I'd like someone to expand on that and explain how the hell the time change has any effect on energy consumption whatsoever. There's still the same number of hours in the day, and the temperature outside is the same no matter wtf our clocks say.Lights at home go on later in the evening during DST. Sure, its the same amount of daylight, but most people aren't up at the crack of dawn cooking, cleaning, watching TV, etc.

penguinz
03-09-2008, 02:00 PM
It stays daylight longer in the evening, which is warmer than the morning.There is the same amount of daylight no matter what time it says on your clock. So how does this effect A/C?

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 02:08 PM
There is the same amount of daylight no matter what time it says on your clock. So how does this effect A/C?It takes longer to cool off. During DST, you have an extra hour. It takes longer to heat up during the day, than cool down in the evening. Your AC will run more during the evening hours than in the morning. You may not have as many lights on, but you AC may run longer. I know, its crazy. I don't see why we don't stay on DST all year.

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 02:30 PM
It stays daylight longer in the evening, which is warmer than the morning.

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/customavatars/avatar115_29.gif

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 02:42 PM
Actually, there is one argument that could be made in favor of it. Since people are technically leaving work an hour earlier in the day in the summer, it would allow businesses to run their A/C one less hour during the hottest part of the day. But that would be assuming they turn the A/C down when everyone goes home, which I doubt most of them do.

Mecca
03-09-2008, 02:50 PM
I like the states that said **** it and don't do it.

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 02:52 PM
But then again, since you are getting home an hour earlier in the day, you're probably cranking up the A/C at home an hour earlier as well, and it's probably more efficient to cool a large number of people in one place than cool them on an individual basis at home. And that's assuming people turn their A/C down at home during the day, which most probably don't.

Damn, this is making my brain hurt.

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 02:53 PM
I like the states that said **** it and don't do it.

Arizona doesn't do it, and look how ****ing hot it is there.

Guru
03-09-2008, 02:53 PM
But then again, since you are getting home an hour earlier in the day, you're probably cranking up the A/C at home an hour earlier as well, and it's probably more efficient to cool a large number of people in one place than cool them on an individual basis at home. And that's assuming people turn their A/C down at home during the day, which most probably don't.

Damn, this is making my brain hurt.
Considering you hardly ever use it now.

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 02:55 PM
Considering you hardly ever use it now.
Meh. Thinking is overrated.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 02:57 PM
Arizona doesn't do it, and look how ****ing hot it is there.They switch time zones, don't they?

Mecca
03-09-2008, 02:58 PM
Arizona and Indiana don't do the daylight savings time shit.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 03:01 PM
Arizona and Indiana don't do the daylight savings time shit.Indiana does now.

Bowser
03-09-2008, 03:32 PM
Indiana does now.

Part of it does, just not the whole state. Don't ask, because I don't know.

chief52
03-09-2008, 03:38 PM
Part of it does, just not the whole state. Don't ask, because I don't know.

The entire state of Indiana now observes DLS. It changed in 2006. The only 2 states that do not observe DLS are Arizona and Hawaii.

Bowser
03-09-2008, 03:39 PM
The entire state of Indiana now observes DLS. It changed in 2006. The only 2 states that do not observe DLS are Arizona and Hawaii.

I stand corrected. Have some neg rep.



I don't understand when the back and forth is. Just let it stay lighter later.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 03:42 PM
Part of it does, just not the whole state. Don't ask, because I don't know.As of April 2, 2006, the entire state of Indiana joined 47 other states in observing Daylight Saving Time. But it wasn't quite as simple and straightforward as all that—telling time in Indiana remains something of a bewildering experience: eighteen counties now observed Central Daylight Time and the remaining 74 counties of Indiana observe Eastern Daylight Time. http://www.infoplease.com/spot/daylight1.html

Bowser
03-09-2008, 03:43 PM
As of April 2, 2006, the entire state of Indiana joined 47 other states in observing Daylight Saving Time. But it wasn't quite as simple and straightforward as all that—telling time in Indiana remains something of a bewildering experience: eighteen counties now observed Central Daylight Time and the remaining 74 counties of Indiana observe Eastern Daylight Time. http://www.infoplease.com/spot/daylight1.html

I stand corrected. Have some neg rep.


I don't understand what the back and forth is. Just let it stay lighter la...



Whoa. Deja vu, all over again.

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 03:45 PM
Part of it does, just not the whole state. Don't ask, because I don't know.

As of April 2, 2006, the entire state of Indiana joined 47 other states in observing Daylight Saving Time.

Bowser
03-09-2008, 03:49 PM
As of April 2, 2006, the entire state of Indiana joined 47 other states in observing Daylight Saving Time.

I stand corrected. Have some ne.....




OH WHAT THE ****???

Silock
03-09-2008, 04:03 PM
Actually, there is one argument that could be made in favor of it. Since people are technically leaving work an hour earlier in the day in the summer, it would allow businesses to run their A/C one less hour during the hottest part of the day. But that would be assuming they turn the A/C down when everyone goes home, which I doubt most of them do.

It's more efficient to keep the place cooler to begin with than to try and cool it down once people get there.

penguinz
03-09-2008, 04:17 PM
It takes longer to cool off. During DST, you have an extra hour. It takes longer to heat up during the day, than cool down in the evening. Your AC will run more during the evening hours than in the morning. You may not have as many lights on, but you AC may run longer. I know, its crazy. I don't see why we don't stay on DST all year.WTF? It does not take longer to heat up. 12 hours of daylight is 12 hours of daylight. The time of day has nothing to do with it.

penguinz
03-09-2008, 04:20 PM
It's more efficient to keep the place cooler to begin with than to try and cool it down once people get there.Exactly. If you do have your temp auto adjust anything more than about 3 degrees is actually less energy efficient.

Bearcat
03-09-2008, 04:32 PM
City Center Square would be hot and humid as hell every Monday morning in the summer... I don't know if they turned the air all the way off or when they turned it back on, but it wasn't just a few degrees and it wouldn't cool down until 3 or 4 Monday; and I don't see how running the air nonstop for 8+ hours to cool a 30 story building would be more efficient than keeping it cool over the weekend.

chiefqueen
03-09-2008, 04:48 PM
If not for DST, it would be getting light at 4:30 AM in the summer.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 05:01 PM
WTF? It does not take longer to heat up. 12 hours of daylight is 12 hours of daylight. The time of day has nothing to do with it.You're still not getting it. Is it warmer at 8pm or 8am during the summer. This would depend on the area of the country in which you live. In my area, its not completely dark in June until 9:30.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 05:04 PM
It's more efficient to keep the place cooler to begin with than to try and cool it down once people get there.This is true. I had a roommate once that told me we should turn the AC off during the day because we werent there and it would be a waste. This is true, but I asked him, do you really want to come home to a 90 degree apartment? This way, it would run continuously to cool it down 20 degrees.

Bugeater
03-09-2008, 05:28 PM
You're still not getting it. Is it warmer at 8pm or 8am during the summer. This would depend on the area of the country in which you live. In my area, its not completely dark in June until 9:30.
No, you still don't get it, it doesn't matter wtf your clock says, it's still hot for the same number of hours during the day. Your A/C is going to run the same amount either way.
This is true. I had a roommate once that told me we should turn the AC off during the day because we werent there and it would be a waste. This is true, but I asked him, do you really want to come home to a 90 degree apartment? This way, it would run continuously to cool it down 20 degrees.
Shutting it off is just idiotic, I can see adjusting it a few degrees overnight but that's it. Hell it takes everything my air conditioner has just to maintain 77 degrees during the day in the summertime, if I shut it off during the day it would take a week to cool my house back down.

BigMeatballDave
03-09-2008, 05:46 PM
No, you still don't get it, it doesn't matter wtf your clock says, it's still hot for the same number of hours during the day.

Again, this depends on where you live. If the high in my area is gonna be 90, it will only be about 70 at 8am. At 8pm it will still be in the low 80's. I'm saying it will be warmer in the evening than it will be in the morning. FTR, I don't think DST really makes a difference in saving energy, and your AC thermostat should remain at a constant, 24/7.

MichaelH
03-09-2008, 05:53 PM
I hate it right now. It's 7:50 ET and the light is still shining in my children's windows. The are usually in bed asleep by 8 or so. Not gonna happen tonight. Plus my beer drinking had to end an hour early. :cuss:

penguinz
03-09-2008, 07:51 PM
I hate it right now. It's 7:50 ET and the light is still shining in my children's windows. The are usually in bed asleep by 8 or so. Not gonna happen tonight. Plus my beer drinking had to end an hour early. :cuss:Get some blackout shades for their rooms. ;)

Zebedee DuBois
03-09-2008, 08:50 PM
Let's just move a half hour next time, and then never change again. Split the difference.

Time designations are arbitrary. You may say it is 4:30 p.m., but you may as well say it's turkey sandwich with mayonnaise.

Chief Roundup
03-09-2008, 09:44 PM
It is more efficent for your unit to not be in operation while you are not there.
If you have a programmable Thermostat you can pick the times for when your unit will call for certain temperatures.
Say if you leave for work and 7:30 and return home at 5:30 you can set your thermostat to change from a temperature setting of 72 to 65 from 7:30 until 4:30 or 5:00 and then return the setting to 72 so that the house will be warm when you get back home. Not to mention at night when you go to bed and get up in the morning the same way.
Now if your house is not insulated good enough or if your heating or cooling units are not properly sized you may have trouble.

penguinz
03-10-2008, 03:19 AM
It is more efficent for your unit to not be in operation while you are not there.
If you have a programmable Thermostat you can pick the times for when your unit will call for certain temperatures.
Say if you leave for work and 7:30 and return home at 5:30 you can set your thermostat to change from a temperature setting of 72 to 65 from 7:30 until 4:30 or 5:00 and then return the setting to 72 so that the house will be warm when you get back home. Not to mention at night when you go to bed and get up in the morning the same way.
Now if your house is not insulated good enough or if your heating or cooling units are not properly sized you may have trouble.Not true. That is too much a temperature swing. Your unit will have to work much harder and use more energy to raise the temp that much than it would if you left it constant.

Chief Roundup
03-10-2008, 06:44 AM
Not true. That is too much a temperature swing. Your unit will have to work much harder and use more energy to raise the temp that much than it would if you left it constant.

I am correct! Heat and A/C is what I do for a living.
Like I said if your house is insulated correctly and your Heat and A/C units are sized correctly that is the most economical way to run your system.
If your house is not insulated correctly then absolutely not.
The normal cycle time for units is 12 to 15 minutes. If your unit is having to run more than 30 minutes at a time then you have issues that is causing your system to be over worked.

For those in the KC area try calling Boan Heat and A/C or Precision Heating and Cooling. They will tell you the same thing.

chief52
03-10-2008, 06:56 AM
I am correct! Heat and A/C is what I do for a living.
Like I said if your house is insulated correctly and your Heat and A/C units are sized correctly that is the most economical way to run your system.
If your house is not insulated correctly then absolutely not.
The normal cycle time for units is 12 to 15 minutes. If your unit is having to run more than 30 minutes at a time then you have issues that is causing your system to be over worked.


While I do not do heat and A/C, I am a lineman for the power company. Chief Roundup is exactly right. It is more efficient for your unit to not be in operation while you are not there.

cadmonkey
03-10-2008, 07:39 AM
I was partying saturday night, and around 4am someone says "Hey we need to move the clocks ahead". Wow, it just got to be 5am REAL QUICK!

penguinz
03-10-2008, 07:42 AM
I am correct! Heat and A/C is what I do for a living.
Like I said if your house is insulated correctly and your Heat and A/C units are sized correctly that is the most economical way to run your system.
If your house is not insulated correctly then absolutely not.
The normal cycle time for units is 12 to 15 minutes. If your unit is having to run more than 30 minutes at a time then you have issues that is causing your system to be over worked.

For those in the KC area try calling Boan Heat and A/C or Precision Heating and Cooling. They will tell you the same thing.Whatever. :rolleyes:

Lzen
03-10-2008, 09:04 AM
I like DST. I like being able to have daylight to do things outside in the evening in the springtime. It does suck having to get my body used to getting up an hour earlier than before. It takes about a week or two for me to get used to that.

Brock
03-10-2008, 09:18 AM
Whatever. :rolleyes:

An amazing rebuttal. You've convinced us.

ChiefButthurt
03-10-2008, 10:14 AM
I don't even care about having to change the clocks.

That first week after the change ****s up my whole sleep cycle.

Research has determined that it only effects OLD people. :D

penguinz
03-10-2008, 10:51 AM
An amazing rebuttal. You've convinced us.Shouldn't you be sucking Matt Ryan's dick?

Brock
03-10-2008, 11:04 AM
Shouldn't you be sucking Matt Ryan's dick?

What an awful thing to say. Shocking!

BigMeatballDave
03-10-2008, 02:26 PM
It is more efficent for your unit to not be in operation while you are not there.
Really? Seems to me if the AC is off all day you would have to run it continuously until it cooled off. Of course, if your home is well insulated, it wouldn't get too hot.