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View Full Version : Difficulties of Being a College Scout.


CoMoChief
03-09-2008, 08:17 PM
Good read IMO.
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/draft08/columns/story?columnist=reese_floyd&id=3274920


The scouting combine is complete, college pro days are in full swing and the draft is approaching. This is a nerve-racking time for everyone involved in the decision-making process. It's also the culmination of a long, hectic process, and college scouts are at its core. Here are five issues that make the job of a college scout difficult:

1. The schedule: Scouting is not a leisurely stroll across a college campus to watch a sunny afternoon practice. Right after the draft ends, scouts must start preparing for the next one. A scout determines where potential prospects are located, then puts together a detailed schedule of visits. Smaller schools, with few if any noteworthy players, will be seen early. This allows the bulk of the college season to be spent visiting the best prospects. Most major prospects will be seen a minimum of three times -- two school visits and pro day. After the season, juniors declare for the draft, and then their evaluations begin. After that come the all-star games, the combine, pro days, lengthy meetings and finally, the draft at the end of April.

During the college season, scouts will begin visits on Monday, and their best chance to see a player practice will be between Tuesday and Thursday. A scout shows up on campus between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. and spends about six hours visiting with coaches and watching film until practice. He then watches practice for about two hours in the afternoon. Afterward, he jumps into the car and drives to the next campus, checks into a hotel, and spends hours writing reports on the players he just evaluated.

Friday is either a film day or a travel day, depending on the location of the game he will watch on Saturday. A scout's average Sunday consists of completing reports, washing clothes and preparing for the next week. For most scouts, this routine is a way of life from mid-August through December.

2. Restrictions: College visits and general information are becoming increasingly restricted. Some schools will limit visits to one specified day a week, while others open up only one week the entire season. Paranoia runs deep in the football world, and concerns of scouts sharing information about preparation, game plans or injuries are commonplace.

Some schools refuse questions on players' backgrounds or health.

Every year, we read articles in which an unidentified scout claims to have information about a chronic physical problem, failed drug tests, an arrest or probation. These are issues that may affect a player's value, and such articles can have a significant impact on the school or scout. If a player feels he lost millions because a trainer or coach disclosed an injury or character flaw, the possibility of a lawsuit exists.

3. Scouting juniors: The annual debates about whether particular juniors may declare for the draft are strictly off-limits for a scout. Colleges want to keep the players they have spent time and money recruiting. Scouts do not talk to juniors, talk to the media about juniors or write reports on them. The NFL has a process to help these players determine their worth, but only after they have declared eligible. Once a junior declares eligible, his scouting begins immediately.

4. National scouting: All but one or two franchises in the NFL belong to a scouting combine. Each organization will provide a scout who will be assigned to a specific area of the country. Even though these scouts are employed by NFL franchises, their primary obligation is to the combine. They will identify, evaluate and report on all prospects in their area to every franchise participating in the combine. Twice annually, weeklong meetings are dedicated to the scouting combine. The same reports, grades and information go out to each participating team.

5. No public glory: Following a successful draft, the general manager or decision-maker will be labeled a genius. The position coach is applauded for developing the player. The coordinator is crowned for using the player correctly. The head coach will make millions for winning. No one will know the group of scouts who pieced together the draft. Although all of the above individuals deserve a piece of the success, no one is more deserving than the scouts. Every great player on every Super Bowl team was, at some point, identified by an overworked, underpaid and underappreciated scout.

88TG88
03-09-2008, 08:19 PM
Sounds better than any job I've had.

Mecca
03-09-2008, 08:30 PM
I'd enjoy doing it, but hey that's just me.

eazyb81
03-09-2008, 09:18 PM
Anyone have an idea of how much NFL scouts earn? I'm sure national crosscheckers and directors of player personnel make bank, but what about just a standard scout or even a regional scout?

Buehler445
03-09-2008, 09:19 PM
If I weren't married, I'd enjoy the hell out of it.

Mecca
03-09-2008, 09:41 PM
Anyone have an idea of how much NFL scouts earn? I'm sure national crosscheckers and directors of player personnel make bank, but what about just a standard scout or even a regional scout?

I'm sure it pays the bills.

Zebedee DuBois
03-09-2008, 09:43 PM
If I weren't married, I'd enjoy the hell out of it.


This strikes me as a quote than can be used for any number of situations.

Mecca
03-09-2008, 09:47 PM
Wouldn't you enjoy it more if you were married, I mean you can leave and say "I gotta go to these games, it's my job"

eazyb81
03-09-2008, 09:52 PM
Wouldn't you enjoy it more if you were married, I mean you can leave and say "I gotta go to these games, it's my job"

I was thinking the same thing.....

evolve27
03-09-2008, 09:55 PM
Sounds easy.

Mecca
03-09-2008, 09:56 PM
Sounds easy.

Other than if you don't have a good eye for talent then the organization will fire you for sucking.

evolve27
03-09-2008, 10:00 PM
Other than if you don't have a good eye for talent then the organization will fire you for sucking.

Are you foreshadowing Carls demise?:eek:

TrebMaxx
03-09-2008, 10:14 PM
I would take being a scout over what I currently do. At least it involves something I have a passion for instead of just being a job to pay the bills. I imagine it could become tiresome after a few years on the job, the travel anyway. The "Once a junior declares eligible, his scouting begins immediately." cracked me up. I call BS on that one. They just don't talk to the public about juniors. If they didn't scout the juniors then I would say they aren't doing their jobs.

Chiefmanwillcatch
03-09-2008, 10:15 PM
who is our scout?

stlchiefs
03-09-2008, 10:18 PM
[QUOTE=CoMoChief;4623197]Good read IMO.
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/draft08/columns/story?columnist=reese_floyd&id=3274920

4. National scouting: All but one or two franchises in the NFL belong to a scouting combine.

Wonder which team/s this might be and why the author doesn't know if it's 1 or 2 teams? It'd be interesting to know who goes at it alone and how they fair in drafting players.

eazyb81
03-09-2008, 10:19 PM
who is our scout?

We have quite a few:

http://www.kcchiefs.com/directory

evolve27
03-09-2008, 10:20 PM
who is our scout?

Director of College Scouting - Chuck Cook
Regional Scout/Scouting Coordinator - Bruce Lemmerman
Scouts - Terry Delp, Cornell Gowdy, Mike Hagen, Matt Littlefield, Greg Olejack, Willie Davis

Mecca
03-09-2008, 10:28 PM
I wonder what it requires to be a scout...they should hire me.

Zouk
03-09-2008, 10:38 PM
I wonder what it requires to be a scout...they should hire me.

Did you play college ball? Just about 100% of NFL scouts played college ball, and a majority played pro at some level. Most coached some too. It's either that or be Bill Polian's son.

eazyb81
03-09-2008, 10:42 PM
Did you play college ball? Just about 100% of NFL scouts played college ball, and a majority played pro at some level. Most coached some too. It's either that or be Bill Polian's son.

It seems like they're starting to get away from that a little bit and focus more on smart guys, rather than just former players. Mecca would still be out of luck there though. :D

Look how many MLB GMs these days don't have any baseball background - they are just intelligent guys that have the aptitude to pick up the game. I'm guessing the NFL will start moving that way soon, it makes sense.

evolve27
03-09-2008, 10:43 PM
I wonder what it requires to be a scout...they should hire me.

When you draft Sedrick Ellis ahead of Jake Long it just shows you have many deficiencies in what it takes to be a scout in today's NFL. Try the Arena League.--j/k

Mecca
03-09-2008, 10:44 PM
It seems like they're starting to get away from that a little bit and focus more on smart guys, rather than just former players. Mecca would still be out of luck there though. :D

Look how many MLB GMs these days don't have any baseball background - they are just intelligent guys that have the aptitude to pick up the game. I'm guessing the NFL will start moving that way soon, it makes sense.

I pity the fool that questions my football knowledge.

alanm
03-09-2008, 10:49 PM
Wouldn't you enjoy it more if you were married, I mean you can leave and say "I gotta go to these games, it's my job"
I doubt they have much time for some strange on the side. :D

Mecca
03-09-2008, 10:51 PM
I doubt they have much time for some strange on the side. :D

Hey and you are at colleges all the time with drunk impressionable young females....

Sign me up.

Zouk
03-09-2008, 10:57 PM
It seems like they're starting to get away from that a little bit and focus more on smart guys, rather than just former players. Mecca would still be out of luck there though. :D

Look how many MLB GMs these days don't have any baseball background - they are just intelligent guys that have the aptitude to pick up the game. I'm guessing the NFL will start moving that way soon, it makes sense.

You can be a GM without a football background. You'd have to go to law school, in all likelihood, and become a cap guy/negotiator like Tannenbaum with the Jets or Loomis with the Saints. But to be a football scout? No way. Baseball is a statistical game - as we know from Bill James and Moneyball. But there are no stats that a PHD can analyze and then tell you if Glenn Dorsey will be better than Sedrick Ellis. There is no regression model that will be of much help either. You need football people for that.

blueballs
03-10-2008, 12:26 AM
Having the hot coeds blow them
so their boy gets a good grade must really suck

eazyb81
03-10-2008, 08:27 AM
You can be a GM without a football background. You'd have to go to law school, in all likelihood, and become a cap guy/negotiator like Tannenbaum with the Jets or Loomis with the Saints. But to be a football scout? No way. Baseball is a statistical game - as we know from Bill James and Moneyball. But there are no stats that a PHD can analyze and then tell you if Glenn Dorsey will be better than Sedrick Ellis. There is no regression model that will be of much help either. You need football people for that.

I don't know, I think stats could be used in a more meaningful way in football than how they are used today. Certainly it is helpful to have a football background, but I firmly believe that advances could be made in the way we scout players by bringing in some guys that think outside the standard box.

Brock
03-10-2008, 08:38 AM
I wonder what it requires to be a scout...they should hire me.

Well, you'll need a work history for one thing....

Skip Towne
03-10-2008, 11:30 AM
Well, you'll need a work history for one thing....

He worked for Phobia that one day. Oh wait, Iowanian just made that up.

Direckshun
03-10-2008, 12:20 PM
This reminds me of listening to a DVD commentary by a bunch of actors as they complain about how hard it was to shoot several scenes in the film.

Blow me. That job kicks my jobs ass.

El Jefe
03-10-2008, 02:10 PM
I wonder what it requires to be a scout...they should hire me.

On that thought, I have an interesting story. My biology teacher in High School was a scout for the Rams for a bunch of years. He assitant coached at Southern Miss (or Ole Miss I dont remember), then he coached our High School for about 5 years. Then he scouted all over Ohio and the bordering States during College Football season. Eventually he got too old, he still teaches but he said it was too much travelling for him. He was a football genius, an old school guy, he was also a Dr. Very very smart man, he could find talent like you wouldnt believe.