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pikesome
03-18-2008, 05:22 PM
http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/article3579120.ece

Science fiction writer Sir Arthur C Clarke has died aged 90 in his adopted home of Sri Lanka, it was confirmed tonight.

Clarke, who had battled debilitating post-polio syndrome since the 1960s and sometimes used a wheelchair, died at 1:30 a.m. after suffering breathing problems, aide Rohan De Silva said.

The visionary author of over 100 books, who predicted the existance of satellites, was most famous for his novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for his collaboration with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same name

He was also credited with the concept of communications satellites in 1945, decades before they became a reality.
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Clarke was the last surviving member of what was sometimes known as the "Big Three" of science fiction alongside Robert A. Heinlein and Isaac Asimov.

The son of an English farming family, Clarke was born in the seaside town of Minehead, Somerset, England on December 16, 1917.

After attending schools in his home county, Arthur Clarke moved to London in 1936 and pursued his early interest in space sciences by joining the British Interplanetary Society. He started to contribute to the BIS Bulletin and began to write science fiction.

With the onset of World War II he joined the RAF, eventually becoming an officer in charge of the first radar talk-down equipment, the Ground Controlled Approach, during its experimental trials. Later, his only non-science-fiction novel, Glide Path, was based on this work.

In 1945, a UK periodical magazine “Wireless World” published his landmark technical paper "Extra-terrestrial Relays" in which he first set out the principles of satellite communication with satellites in geostationary orbits - a speculation realized 25 years later. During the evolution of his discovery, he worked with scientists and engineers in the USA in the development of spacecraft and launch systems, and addressed the United Nations during their deliberations on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space.

Today, the geostationary orbit at 36,000 kilometres above the equator is named The Clarke Orbit by the International Astronomical Union.

Despite his vast contribution Clarke still is best known as a visionary science fiction writer.

The first story he sold professionally was "Rescue Party", written in March 1945 and appearing in Astounding Science in May 1946. He went on to become a prolific writer of science fiction, renowned worldwide.

In 1964, he started to work with the noted film producer Stanley Kubrick on a science fiction movie script. Four years later, he shared an Oscar nomination with Kubrick at the Hollywood Academy Awards for the film version of “2001: A Space Odyssey”.

In television, Clarke worked alongside Walter Cronkite and Wally Schirra for the CBS coverage of the Apollo 12 and 15 space missions. His thirteen-part TV series Arthur C. Clarke's Mysterious World in 1981 and Arthur C. Clarke's World of strange Powers in 1984 has been screened in many countries and he has contributed to other TV series about space, such as Walter Cronkite's Universe series in 1981.

Clarke first visited Colombo, Sri Lanka (then called Ceylon) in December 1954 and has lived there since 1956 pursuing an enthusiasm for underwater exploration along that coast and on the Great Barrier Reef.

In 1998, his lifetime work was recognised when he was honoured with a Knighthood – formally conferred by Prince Charles in Sri Lanka two years later.

In recent years, he has been largely confined to a wheelchair due to post-polio syndrome, but his output as a writer continued undiminished.

The end of an era. :(

Bowser
03-18-2008, 05:23 PM
RIP

SNR
03-18-2008, 05:37 PM
:(

What an incredible life. He will be missed.

RIP

Adept Havelock
03-18-2008, 05:43 PM
The only way of finding the limits of the possible is by going beyond them into the impossible.

RIP to a brilliant mind that regularly tested those limits.

Mr. Clarke was one of the first authors I really enjoyed. Thanks for the books that led me to flights of fancy, to deep contemplation, and more late-night bull sessions than I can recall.

I'll miss his brilliant wit:



How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean.

I don't believe in astrology; I'm a Sagittarius and we're skeptical.

New ideas pass through three periods: 1) It can't be done. 2) It probably can be done, but it's not worth doing. 3) I knew it was a good idea all along!

Reading computer manuals without the hardware is as frustrating as reading sex manuals without the software.

keg in kc
03-18-2008, 06:18 PM
Sad day.

Skip Towne
03-18-2008, 06:24 PM
It's amazing that he conceived satellite technology before we even had the jet engine.

mikey23545
03-18-2008, 06:26 PM
One of the great minds of these times....And another piece of childhood slips away.

RIP Arthur...Childhood's End.

seclark
03-18-2008, 06:29 PM
in.
rip
sec

StcChief
03-18-2008, 08:10 PM
RIP Mr.Clarke

Third Eye
03-18-2008, 08:17 PM
Truly one of the greats, RIP.

Braincase
03-18-2008, 08:33 PM
Thanks for hours, weeks and days of wonderful especulation, from The Sentinal to Rendezvous with Rama, truly an outstanding imagination with a proper grounding in scientific fact.

Tie to read "Childhood's End" again, my personal favorite of his.

Frazod
03-18-2008, 08:48 PM
RIP. Loved your work.

Third Eye
03-18-2008, 11:08 PM
Thanks for hours, weeks and days of wonderful especulation, from The Sentinal to Rendezvous with Rama, truly an outstanding imagination with a proper grounding in scientific fact.

Tie to read "Childhood's End" again, my personal favorite of his.
You know I still have never read that. I have wanted to for years. Maybe this will be the impetus.

PS- that is also my favorite Floyd song.

mikey23545
03-18-2008, 11:12 PM
You know I still have never read that. I have wanted to for years. Maybe this will be the impetus.


Do yourself the favor, you won't be sorry.

mikey23545
03-18-2008, 11:17 PM
I am so happy to have a couple of first editions of his books, including "The Exploration of Space" which I believe is the first time anyone came up with the idea of the geostationary communications satellite...Still great reading even today.

And yes, it came out 6 years before the first crude satellites were launched.

Mr. Kotter
03-18-2008, 11:34 PM
R.I.P., Mr. Clarke. :(

Chiefmanwillcatch
03-19-2008, 02:03 AM
what were his best books? We all know of 2001

Warrior5
03-19-2008, 06:01 AM
what were his best books? We all know of 2001

He has several collections of short stories. "Childhood's End" was excellent. I also enjoyed "The Deep Range".

My favorite by far was "Rendezvous with Rama"... I'm still hoping it becomes a movie.