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View Full Version : For *@#%s sake, is McCain trying to %$#@ me off?


pikesome
03-24-2008, 08:14 PM
Now that John McCain has clenched the GOP nomination (where is your brokered convention, Paultards?), he is working to organize a coherent infrastructure for the campaign and party apparatus. Called "Victory '08," the team he is putting in place is top notch and run with the precision of a CEO. The CEO of record being Carly Fiorina, formerly of Hewlett-Packard.

Great...

He's really impressing me with his ability to find quality talent. I'm not sure he could have picked a business person I think less of, Ken Lay is dead. :rolleyes:

And yes, I know it's not a cabinet post or something, but Fiorina? For ****s sake.

banyon
03-24-2008, 08:25 PM
Well she's got a lot of free time on her hands these days, right? :shrug:

Ultra Peanut
03-24-2008, 08:47 PM
Sellouts do tend to disappoint people.

chiefforlife
03-24-2008, 08:53 PM
Dont know much about her. Can you tell me a little bit about her and what position did she receive?

pikesome
03-24-2008, 09:13 PM
HOLY ****ING SHIT!!!!!!!!!!!!

Fiorina has been touted as a potential Vice President in a McCain administration. She endorsed Senator John McCain as the Republican nominee in the 2008 Presidential elections and campaigned with him.

From Wikipedia.

Buehler445
03-24-2008, 09:14 PM
Great...

He's really impressing me with his ability to find quality talent. I'm not sure he could have picked a business person I think less of, Ken Lay is dead. :rolleyes:

And yes, I know it's not a cabinet post or something, but Fiorina? For ****s sake.

Didn't she get the axe for some rediculous severance pay?

pikesome
03-24-2008, 09:17 PM
Dont know much about her. Can you tell me a little bit about her and what position did she receive?

Hewlett-Packard Company (1999-2005)

Fiorina joined Hewlett-Packard Company on July 19, 1999 as CEO, succeeding Lewis Platt.[12] She was not involved in the decision to spin-off Agilent Technologies but she presided over the process of implementing this decision. She often referred to her efforts as an attempt to "Reinvent HP." During the general business downturn in 2001, Fiorina opted for 7,000 layoffs.[13]

Throughout her career at HP, Fiorina was a very visible CEO. Her business travel included interactions with Hollywood entertainers and politicians. Her actions prompted the San Jose Mercury News to speculate that she might later run for election to public office.

In 2001 she was named one of the 30 most powerful women in America by Ladies Home Journal.

[edit] Compaq merger

In 2002, Fiorina proposed a controversial merger with rival company Compaq. She campaigned for this plan and it was implemented amid public clashes with board member Walter Hewlett[14], the son of HP founder William Hewlett. After the merger, quarterly results were inconsistent, leading to several sharp sell-offs in the shares. After the merger, HP saw an exodus of top managerial talent, mostly from the Compaq side, including Michael Capellas, Jeff Clarke, Mary McDowell, and the forced resignation of Peter Blackmore. HP's combined PC business was number one for the year following the merger until Dell Computer Corp (now Dell, Inc.) regained the top spot. HP's services lost market share to IBM, and HP relied upon its lucrative printer division to remain profitable.

On January 7, 2004, at a meeting with Congressional members, Fiorina said, "There is no job that is America's God-given right anymore. We have to compete for jobs as a nation."[15][16][17] Her statements angered Bay Area workers who felt that low wages overseas encouraged corporations to use less-qualified offshore workers instead of well-qualified locals.[18] Fiorina responded to this criticism by publishing a clarifying op-ed piece in the Wall Street Journal.[19]

Fiorina was named in the Time 100 for 2004.[20]

[edit] Departure

As HP's performance slowed, the Board of Directors became increasingly concerned. In early January 2005, the HP Board of Directors presented Fiorina with a four-page list of issues the board had with Fiorina's performance.[21] A week after the meeting, the plan was leaked to the Wall Street Journal.[22] The board proposed a plan to shift her authority to HP division heads, which Fiorina resisted.[23]

On 9 February 2005, Carly Fiorina was dismissed as chairman and chief executive officer of HP. "While I regret the board and I have differences about how to execute HP's strategy, I respect their decision," Fiorina said in a statement. "HP is a great company and I wish all the people of HP much success in the future." She was replaced by Patricia C. Dunn as chairman and CFO Robert Wayman as CEO.[24] Hewlett-Packard's stock jumped 7% on news of her departure.[25]

Under Hewlett-Packard's severance agreement, Carly Fiorina received US $21 million in cash, which was 2.5 times her base annual salary.[26] On March 8, 2006, two large institutional investors filed suit against Hewlett-Packard for violating its own severance cap when it doled out a multimillion-dollar payment to Fiorina as part of her termination agreement.[27]

She was high profile and ineffective if you would like to give her the benefit of the doubt. And, just in case you're not sure she sucks:

In early 2005, Fiorina became upset that confidential company information was being leaked to the press. She hired lawyers to question board members. No one confessed.

Fiorina was forced to resign on Feb. 9. The leaks continued, so new Chairman Patricia Dunn hired an investigation firm to hunt down the source.

The firm reported that board member George Keyworth II, former science adviser to President Ronald Reagan, had been talking to the press. He was outed during a May 18 board meeting and asked to resign. He refused.

The public flaying angered board member Tom Perkins, a prominent venture capitalist, who had wanted Dunn to deal with Keyworth privately. Perkins resigned in protest.

The next month, Perkins asked HP to examine how the investigation firm obtained its information. HP hired lawyers to do the work.

The lawyers soon reported that a subcontractor hired by the investigation firm had used a controversial technique called "pretexting" to obtain phone records of board members and reporters.

Pretexting is the act of contacting a phone or other company pretending to be someone else, in order to get their confidential records.

Outraged, Perkins contacted his phone company, AT&T, and discovered that his account had been accessed that way. AT&T in turn contacted the California Attorney General's Office. HP was forced to respond last week by filing a document with the Securities and Exchange Commission outlining the battle.

It's unclear whether the investigators broke any laws, but the Attorney General and the SEC are both launching inquiries.
On edit: I cut & pasted the wrong section, read the article.

http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2006-09-07-hp-probe-fiorina_x.htm

pikesome
03-24-2008, 09:18 PM
Didn't she get the axe for some rediculous severance pay?

No she got the axe for being worthless, HP's stock went up when she was fired. And then the shareholders found out about the package and sued.

mikey23545
03-24-2008, 09:26 PM
Sellouts do tend to disappoint people.

Just ask Reverend Wright.

Ultra Peanut
03-24-2008, 09:49 PM
Just ask Reverend Wright.That is retarded you are retarded

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 02:25 AM
Sellouts do tend to disappoint people.

Some just call it opinion reassignment surgery.