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View Full Version : Sad story: Jayci Yaeger wants to see her dad before she dies


dirk digler
03-25-2008, 07:42 PM
Wow. This is a tragedy and I hope and pray that the evil ****ing warden or somebody step in and do the right thing here.


http://www.kolnkgin.com/news/headlines/16929056.html

The fight to bring an imprisoned father home to his dying daughter has touched the hearts of the entire nation.

Time is running out on 10-year-old Jayci Yaeger. Her family said she's having a tough time and is progressively getting worse every day.
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(http://cas.clickability.com/cac?a=79752&n=32727&d=59276&c=6500)</td></tr></tbody></table> Her last wish to have her father at her side is still unanswered, he remains in a federal prison on drug charges.

The story (http://www.kolnkgin.com/news/headlines/16762906.html) has gripped the nation; Jayci Yaeger lies in a hospital bed, dying of cancer and her last wish to have her father Jason. With her remains unanswered by the warden of a federal prison in South Dakota. Now the public is getting involved.

"Kids aren't supposed to die. It's not the way it's supposed to work," said Rose Gordon, Michigan.

Rose Gordon lives in Michigan. She has no ties to Nebraska or the Yaegers, yet the story has spurred her to action.

"I think the United States should be in outraged at the fact that somebody is perfectly willing to say a child dying is not just cause for father to be there. I'm outraged. I think the entire U.S. should be up in arms about this," she said.

Gordon has started a petition for Jayci online, one she intends to send to the prison and every politician she can think of. To sign petitions, click here (http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Have-Mercy-on-Jayci) and here (http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/Jaycisdyingwiss/). A little girl's last wish remains ungranted Saturday.

Congressman Jeff Fortenberry has made two requests for clarification to the bureau of prisons on the issue.

Sen. Chuck Hagel's office said he is making inquiries into the case after receiving calls from the family.

Sen. Ben Nelson's office said they too are actively looking into the situation, but acknowledge they can't force the prison to let Jason go.
Gov. Dave Heineman's representative said they have received hundreds of calls and e-mails, and they have been in contact with Nelson and Hagel as well as Gov. Mike Rounds in South Dakota.

Rounds said they too have gotten hundreds of calls, and he is referring people to the federal level.
But time is running out, those wanting to help Jayci just hope the warden hears their unified voice before it's too late.
"Jayci just wants her daddy. I want him to reconsider. I want Jayci to have her daddy," she said.

The Yaeger family said unfortunately Jayci is having a hard time. Sunday night she had several small seizures and her oxygen level dropped very low, she even turned a bluish color for quite a while.
Her family said she is resting comfortably Monday, but her blood pressure is dangerously low.

Of course, time is short in this case, and Jason Yaeger has taken the case to President Bush, asking for clemency.

If you would like to get in touch with the Yaeger family or Jason you can send letters to:
The Yaeger Family
P.O. Box 5818
Lincoln, Neb. 68505-5818

The Yaegers has been asked if there is a way for the public to help the family with the assistance of Jayci's funeral, which we know will be soon in the future. The family has set up a place where people can send donations:
Jayci Yaeger Benefit Fund
Care of Guardians Incorp.
1707 South 17th St. Suite 1D
Lincoln, Neb. 68502

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 07:45 PM
I feel bad for the kid. She's deluded herself into thinking that she has a father.

Rain Man
03-25-2008, 07:46 PM
I guess he shouldn't have been using drugs.

dirk digler
03-25-2008, 07:47 PM
I feel bad for the kid. She's deluded herself into thinking that she has a father.

That is kind of callous to say. The guy is set to get out in August after serving 5 years. They could release him early or just let him visit his daughter before she passes.

Adept Havelock
03-25-2008, 07:47 PM
Damn shame. Looks like this idiot warden wants to be "tough on crime" by denying a child her dying wish.

I guess he shouldn't have been using drugs.

Agreed, but that's no reason to deny a dying child a chance to see him.

Lock the guy up for an extra day or two to make up for it, but let the kid see her "father" if the kid wants.

JMO.

keg in kc
03-25-2008, 07:53 PM
Unbelievable.

dirk digler
03-25-2008, 07:53 PM
Vonda Yaeger said she has been told by officials at the prison in Yankton, S.D., that her daughter's illness is not an extraordinary circumstance.

Jason Yaeger has been imprisoned for almost five years on a methamphetamine conviction. He is scheduled to be released next year.
U.S. Bureau of Prisons policy allows furloughs because of with wardens deciding when a request is justified and can be granted safely.

"We've never asked them to release him early -- never asked them to change anything," Vonda Yaeger said. "We've asked them to just give him some time to be here."

She said she is especially frustrated that her husband is scheduled to be transferred to a halfway house in Omaha in August. That would make visits with Jayci easy, but she said her daughter may not live that long.

Rain Man
03-25-2008, 07:54 PM
Agreed, but that's no reason to deny a dying child a chance to see him.

Lock the guy up for an extra day or two to make up for it, but let the kid see her "father" if the kid wants.

JMO.

I would imagine this is not the first time such an event took place. If we want to start a program where prisoners are transported under guard to see their children on their deathbed, I agree that it might be a good humanitarian thing, as long as the cost of transport and guards isn't excessive. And is it just children? Or how about spouses? Parents? Siblings?

You certainly have to pity the girl, but the truth is that the adult made decisions that got him locked up. He knew the risks going in, and decided that they were tolerable.

dirk digler
03-25-2008, 07:56 PM
I would imagine this is not the first time such an event took place. If we want to start a program where prisoners are transported under guard to see their children on their deathbed, I agree that it might be a good humanitarian thing, as long as the cost of transport and guards isn't excessive. And is it just children? Or how about spouses? Parents? Siblings?

You certainly have to pity the girl, but the truth is that the adult made decisions that got him locked up. He knew the risks going in, and decided that they were tolerable.

Sorry but their excuse is stupid and to say that her death is not a extraordinary circumstance. I would like to know what they consider a extraordinary circumstance.

Logical
03-25-2008, 07:59 PM
I would imagine this is not the first time such an event took place. If we want to start a program where prisoners are transported under guard to see their children on their deathbed, I agree that it might be a good humanitarian thing, as long as the cost of transport and guards isn't excessive. And is it just children? Or how about spouses? Parents? Siblings?

You certainly have to pity the girl, but the truth is that the adult made decisions that got him locked up. He knew the risks going in, and decided that they were tolerable.Actually the family has offered to pay for the guards, so that is not really the issue. I have to give O'Reilly credit for covering the story so comprehensively.

dirk digler
03-25-2008, 08:01 PM
Actually the family has offered to pay for the guards, so that is not really the issue. I have to give O'Reilly credit for covering the story so comprehensively.

Wow I didn't know that. I only caught the end part on O'Reilly's show and that he said the warden should do the right thing

stevieray
03-25-2008, 08:02 PM
You certainly have to pity the girl, but the truth is that the adult made decisions that got him locked up. He knew the risks going in, and decided that they were tolerable.

it is tragic, but it is a hard lesson for some to learn...

Jenson71
03-25-2008, 08:08 PM
I used to live right by the federal prison in Yankton. It was just a block away from me.

keg in kc
03-25-2008, 08:08 PM
WWJD.

stevieray
03-25-2008, 08:09 PM
WWJD.

heal the child...

Rain Man
03-25-2008, 08:11 PM
Sorry but their excuse is stupid and to say that her death is not a extraordinary circumstance. I would like to know what they consider a extraordinary circumstance.

It may be extraordinary to the family, but I really doubt that it's extraordinary to the system. I'll bet family deaths occur with a significant proportion of prisoners during their sentences. If you do it for one, you're probably legally obligated to do it for all. Are you ready to give Charles Manson a ride home to visit his dying sister? Richard Speck an airline ticket to visit his mother with Alzheimer's? It's easy to point out one pitiful case, but harder to make it a policy.

And while it's nice that the family has offered to pay for the guards, it then creates another lawsuit when prisoners with rich families get to do this while prisoners of poor families sit in their cells.

I'm not trying to be unsympathetic, but this is why the warden is saying no. It's not just a slippery slope, it's a slippery cliff.

Maybe there could be a policy where prisoners who are achieving a perfect A rating as prisoners could have this option, but wouldn't you rather spend the money on crime prevention or better DNA testing? I would.

Rain Man
03-25-2008, 08:11 PM
heal the child...

Heh-heh.

dirk digler
03-25-2008, 08:17 PM
It may be extraordinary to the family, but I really doubt that it's extraordinary to the system. I'll bet family deaths occur with a significant proportion of prisoners during their sentences. If you do it for one, you're probably legally obligated to do it for all. Are you ready to give Charles Manson a ride home to visit his dying sister? Richard Speck an airline ticket to visit his mother with Alzheimer's? It's easy to point out one pitiful case, but harder to make it a policy.

And while it's nice that the family has offered to pay for the guards, it then creates another lawsuit when prisoners with rich families get to do this while prisoners of poor families sit in their cells.

I'm not trying to be unsympathetic, but this is why the warden is saying no. It's not just a slippery slope, it's a slippery cliff.

Maybe there could be a policy where prisoners who are achieving a perfect A rating as prisoners could have this option, but wouldn't you rather spend the money on crime prevention or better DNA testing? I would.

First off comparing this guy, who is going to be released in August, to Manson is ridiculous. No warden would ever let a mass murder or someone on death row out for any reason.

This guy was convicted of a drug crime and is going to be released in August. The family isn't asking for him to get out they just want him to visit before she passes.

I would like your opinion on what you would consider extraordinary circumstance.

Rain Man
03-25-2008, 08:26 PM
First off comparing this guy, who is going to be released in August, to Manson is ridiculous. No warden would ever let a mass murder or someone on death row out for any reason.

This guy was convicted of a drug crime and is going to be released in August. The family isn't asking for him to get out they just want him to visit before she passes.

I would like your opinion on what you would consider extraordinary circumstance.

So you think that it can be offered selectively? I would have no problem with that, as mentioned earlier, if the voting public thinks that that's the best use of tax money. I personally wouldn't vote for it as a policy, but if a majority of people do, I could live with it.

As for "extraordinary circumstances", I don't know how I would define it. It would have to be something that was of sufficient importance for a prisoner to be escorted out of prison for a personal benefit, and also something that is rare enough that it can't be claimed by a large enough number of prisoners to swamp the escorting capability. I'm not sure what that would be, but I suspect that "death in the family" fails the second test.

Again, I feel bad for the girl, and it's a bad situation for the whole family. I just don't think it's as easy as the warden saying, "Oh, heck. C'mon, let's run our guard shift a little bit shorthanded and drive the guy down there to see her." The first time a prisoner escapes or the first time a shorthanded guard gets attacked, the media would rip the program and the warden to shreds.

Does anyone know of any current extraordinary circumstances that lead to prisoners being escorted off of prison grounds? There are medical reasons, if the prisoner can't be treated off site, but is there anything else?

Side note: I did a study for a new jail hospital in Denver a while back, preparing projections of hospitalized inmates. It was at a time when telemedicine was being considered, because a few months earlier they'd had an escape. They were transporting a prisoner to a hospital to have knee surgery. They arrive at the hospital, open the van door, and ZOOM! the prisoner is off and running. They've never seen the guy since, and this was a dozen years ago.

dirk digler
03-25-2008, 08:31 PM
So you think that it can be offered selectively? I would have no problem with that, as mentioned earlier, if the voting public thinks that that's the best use of tax money. I personally wouldn't vote for it as a policy, but if a majority of people do, I could live with it.

As for "extraordinary circumstances", I don't know how I would define it. It would have to be something that was of sufficient importance for a prisoner to be escorted out of prison for a personal benefit, and also something that is rare enough that it can't be claimed by a large enough number of prisoners to swamp the escorting capability. I'm not sure what that would be, but I suspect that "death in the family" fails the second test.

Again, I feel bad for the girl, and it's a bad situation for the whole family. I just don't think it's as easy as the warden saying, "Oh, heck. C'mon, let's run our guard shift a little bit shorthanded and drive the guy down there to see her." The first time a prisoner escapes or the first time a shorthanded guard gets attacked, the media would rip the program and the warden to shreds.

Does anyone know of any current extraordinary circumstances that lead to prisoners being escorted off of prison grounds? There are medical reasons, if the prisoner can't be treated off site, but is there anything else?

Side note: I did a study for a new jail hospital in Denver a while back, preparing projections of hospitalized inmates. It was at a time when telemedicine was being considered, because a few months earlier they'd had an escape. They were transporting a prisoner to a hospital to have knee surgery. They arrive at the hospital, open the van door, and ZOOM! the prisoner is off and running. They've never seen the guy since, and this was a dozen years ago.

Here's your answer:

The Federal Bureau of Prisons Web site states its policy -- that furloughs can be allowed for a family crisis and that decision is left to the warden.

So in effect this warden is being a prick and I hope he comes to his senses before it is to late

Also I was a deputy and worked in the jail for a small sheriff's dept. We would have reviewed this on a case by case basis and depending on the detainee we would have allowed this to happen. We are humans unlike this warden.

dirk digler
03-25-2008, 08:40 PM
Wow apparently he has visited her 3 times already and now they won't let him visit.


http://abcnews.go.com/TheLaw/Story?id=4490468&page=3

Jason Yaeger has been allowed three brief supervised visits since the terminal diagnosis last fall, and the visits have prompted remarkable, if short-lived revivals in Jayci's condition, she added.

When he came home in February, Jayci was not expected to live through the night," Lori Yaeger said. "She improved throughout that whole week. Jason was allowed to accompany her to get a CAT scan. He was able to pick her up and put her on the [examining] table,'' she said, growing emotional. "And this little girl who could barely lift an arm wrapped her arms around him and held on."

Adept Havelock
03-25-2008, 09:13 PM
it is tragic, but it is a hard lesson for some to learn...

So the dying child should suffer further for the sins of the father? :shake:

If a dying 10 year old isn't "exceptional circumstances", nothing is. JMO.

Here's your answer:

The Federal Bureau of Prisons Web site states its policy -- that furloughs can be allowed for a family crisis and that decision is left to the warden.

So in effect this warden is being a prick and I hope he comes to his senses before it is to late

Also I was a deputy and worked in the jail for a small sheriff's dept. We would have reviewed this on a case by case basis and depending on the detainee we would have allowed this to happen. We are humans unlike this warden.

Unfortunately, I suspect all the press attention will do will make that waste of flesh of a warden dig in his heels harder. He's probably trying to be seen as the next "Sheriff Joe" or some crap like that.

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 09:18 PM
...If a dying 10 year old isn't "exceptional circumstances", nothing is. JMO.

Good point. An inmate should never be allowed out before his release date no matter how unusual the circumstances may be. JMO.

Ultra Peanut
03-25-2008, 09:19 PM
I feel bad for the kid. She's deluded herself into thinking that she has a father.Heyyyy buddy. **** you.

God for-****ing-bid someone lets a dying child see her non-violent offender father.

Adept Havelock
03-25-2008, 09:20 PM
Good point. An inmate should never be allowed out before his release date no matter how unusual the circumstances may be. JMO.

Thanks for showing retribution/revenge by the state is more important to you than comforting a dying child.

I'm very happy I can't fathom that perspective at all. :Lin:

Ultra Peanut
03-25-2008, 09:21 PM
Thanks for showing revenge by the state is more important to you than comforting a dying child.

I'm very happy I can't fathom that perspective at all.There are RULES here, mister. If someone gets busted for drugs, their kids should bear the full brunt of the consequences!

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 09:26 PM
He put drugs before his daughter's needs. He made that choice.

Adept Havelock
03-25-2008, 09:27 PM
He put drugs before his daughter's needs. He made that choice.

If that rationalizes for you adding to the suffering of a dying 10 year old child, I pity you.

Like I said, I'm glad I can't understand at all where you are coming from on this.

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 09:28 PM
Heyyyy buddy. **** you.

God for-****ing-bid someone lets a dying child see her non-violent offender father.

I would not support any policy that forbids her from seeing him in prison. I would not support any policy that allows him to get out to see her.

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 09:30 PM
If that rationalizes for you adding to the suffering of a dying 10 year old child, I pity you.

I appreciate it. :rolleyes:

Ultra Peanut
03-25-2008, 09:30 PM
He put drugs before his daughter's needs. He made that choice.You. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;|&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The point.

Ultra Peanut
03-25-2008, 09:31 PM
I would not support any policy that forbids her from seeing him in prison. I would not support any policy that allows him to get out to see her.He's not going to go to Disney World on his wild, wacky trip away from the joint. She is TOO ILL to be taken to the prison.

But hey, a five-year charge that's up in a handful of months is totally enough to keep the daughter of such a monster away from him while she's on her deathbed, even as the family offers to pay for it.

Adept Havelock
03-25-2008, 09:31 PM
I appreciate it. :rolleyes:

You're the one who considers retribution more important than compassion for a dying child. :shrug:

To me, that's about as pitiable as it gets.

He's not going to go to Disney World on his wild, wacky trip away from the joint. She is TOO ILL to be taken to the prison.

Apparently revenge on the father is more important than letting a dying child be comforted.

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 09:32 PM
You. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;|&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The point.

Dad does drugs. Dad is convicted. Daughter is dying. Daughter wants to see dad. Tough shit; dad is in prison.

Nope. I'm pretty sure I grasp the point. I just don't care about the point. There is a difference.

Ultra Peanut
03-25-2008, 09:33 PM
Dad does drugs. Dad is convicted. Daughter is dying. Daughter wants to see dad. Tough shit; dad is in prison.

Nope. I'm pretty sure I grasp the point. I just don't care about the point. There is a difference.Wow. You're a pretty big dickhead.

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 09:33 PM
He's not going to go to Disney World on his wild, wacky trip away from the joint. She is TOO ILL to be taken to the prison.

But hey, a five-year charge that's up in a handful of months is totally enough to keep the daughter of such a monster away from him.

Then she'll likely die without seeing him. What's your point?

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 09:34 PM
Wow. You're a pretty big dickhead.

I'm of average size.

Ultra Peanut
03-25-2008, 09:35 PM
Then she'll likely die without seeing him. What's your point?Nothing. That's AWESOME!

I'm of average size.Average size, perhaps, but extensive severity.

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 09:37 PM
...extensive severity.

I agree with that.

CHIEF4EVER
03-25-2008, 10:06 PM
My question is (and it is a bit off the point): Why in the **** are we filling our prison system with drug users? I could see if the dude was part of a Cartel and had someone wacked but a USER? To me, the most ridiculous thing in the world is putting someone behind bars for years for abusing their own bodies. If they want to get so high that they think they are having an out of body experience (in the comfort of their own home) more power to em'. Just don't drive cars around me or do it in front of my kids please.

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 11:06 PM
My question is (and it is a bit off the point): Why in the **** are we filling our prison system with drug users?...

I am sympathetic to that argument. In fact, I would vote to decriminalize simple possession of small amounts of any drug that would reasonably be seen as being for personal use, though I would still favor mandatory treatment for anyone who is caught in possession.

Not enough of my fellow citizens agree with this idea though.

Specifically speaking to this case: Unfortunately for this gentleman, he broke the law, he wrecked his family and he has surrendered his liberty as a consequence of his own choices.

Also, the article that is linked to the OP and the story linked to that article say that this guy is in prison on charges related to meth. What they don't say specifically (unless I missed it somewhere) is whether he was holding, distributing or cooking. I'm sympathetic only if he was holding.

Rain Man
03-25-2008, 11:16 PM
Here's your answer:

The Federal Bureau of Prisons Web site states its policy -- that furloughs can be allowed for a family crisis and that decision is left to the warden.

So in effect this warden is being a prick and I hope he comes to his senses before it is to late

Also I was a deputy and worked in the jail for a small sheriff's dept. We would have reviewed this on a case by case basis and depending on the detainee we would have allowed this to happen. We are humans unlike this warden.

If that's the existing policy, then the question is why the warden isn't going for it.

I'm just saying this, and I know nothing about the situation. Is it possible that the warden has been told three times now that the child is on her deathbed, and then every time, the girl "has a miraculous comeback"? Believe it or not, some people take advantage of situations and some people lie to get what they want, and those behaviors are pretty common in prison populations. Hopefully that's not the case here, but if the warden has let the guy out three times and is now refusing, does it possibly imply that he's not just a jerk and has some reason for turning it down this time?

ClevelandBronco
03-25-2008, 11:17 PM
Hey, Logical: Some old school guy named LVNHACK is asking about you in the Lounge. Get over there.

unlurking
03-26-2008, 12:29 AM
If that's the existing policy, then the question is why the warden isn't going for it.

I'm just saying this, and I know nothing about the situation. Is it possible that the warden has been told three times now that the child is on her deathbed, and then every time, the girl "has a miraculous comeback"? Believe it or not, some people take advantage of situations and some people lie to get what they want, and those behaviors are pretty common in prison populations. Hopefully that's not the case here, but if the warden has let the guy out three times and is now refusing, does it possibly imply that he's not just a jerk and has some reason for turning it down this time?


Excellent question, and I'd like to know the answer as well. According to the quote, one of the three prior visits he was allowed WAS when she was on her "deathbed", and she recovered.

'Hamas' Jenkins
03-26-2008, 12:42 AM
He put drugs before his daughter's needs. He made that choice.

Was his daughter the one hitting the lightbulb?

This isn't about him, it's about her. I can't believe you're so goddamned obtuse you can't see this blatantly obvious fact.

'Hamas' Jenkins
03-26-2008, 12:45 AM
Specifically speaking to this case: Unfortunately for this gentleman, he broke the law, he wrecked his family and he has surrendered his liberty as a consequence of his own choices..


This must be that compassionate conservatism I've heard all about.

Logical
03-26-2008, 12:48 AM
Excellent question, and I'd like to know the answer as well. According to the quote, one of the three prior visits he was allowed WAS when she was on her "deathbed", and she recovered.

According to Fox she suffered a stroke today and is slipping in and out of a coma, probably has less than 48 hours to live.

ClevelandBronco
03-26-2008, 12:53 AM
This must be that compassionate conservatism I've heard all about.

Perhaps you've mistaken me for some other Republican. I don't want our government to be compassionate.

'Hamas' Jenkins
03-26-2008, 12:55 AM
Perhaps you've mistaken me for some other Republican. I don't want our government to be compassionate.

I wouldn't expect you to want something of another entity when the existence of that very thing is completely alien to you.

ClevelandBronco
03-26-2008, 12:58 AM
Was his daughter the one hitting the lightbulb?

This isn't about him, it's about her. I can't believe you're so goddamned obtuse you can't see this blatantly obvious fact.

This girl doesn't have a father. I admit that I wish she had one.

ClevelandBronco
03-26-2008, 01:00 AM
I wouldn't expect you to want something of another entity when the existence of that very thing is completely alien to you.

My faith and my church are the vessels that hold my compassion. I don't think that it is wise to pour it into my government.

patteeu
03-26-2008, 06:12 AM
Hey, Logical: Some old school guy named LVNHACK is asking about you in the Lounge. Get over there.

You should have told him to come comment in this thread. He is (or at least was) an employee (they apparently don't like to be called "guards") at the Leavenworth federal prison, iirc.

dirk digler
03-26-2008, 08:43 AM
If that's the existing policy, then the question is why the warden isn't going for it.

I'm just saying this, and I know nothing about the situation. Is it possible that the warden has been told three times now that the child is on her deathbed, and then every time, the girl "has a miraculous comeback"? Believe it or not, some people take advantage of situations and some people lie to get what they want, and those behaviors are pretty common in prison populations. Hopefully that's not the case here, but if the warden has let the guy out three times and is now refusing, does it possibly imply that he's not just a jerk and has some reason for turning it down this time?

I think that is a legitimate question but IMO the solution is simple. All he has to do is pick up the phone and call the doctor to see if the girl is actually close to dying.

Rain Man
03-27-2008, 01:26 PM
So the little girl got to see her meth-monkey father.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,342253,00.html

Logical
03-27-2008, 01:38 PM
So the little girl got to see her meth-monkey father.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,342253,00.html


Great news thanks Kevin.