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View Full Version : Pastor Jeremiah Wright in Context...


Taco John
03-25-2008, 09:39 PM
Thought this was interesting...

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It's a different picture when you get a chance to see the sound bite in some actual context.

Ultra Peanut
03-25-2008, 09:42 PM
This is politics, buster. Context is not allowed.

HolmeZz
03-25-2008, 10:20 PM
If context mattered, the stuff a lot of people are feigning outrage about wouldn't get much play in the media.

patteeu
03-26-2008, 05:47 AM
How much can context make allegations that the US created AIDS in order to perpetrate a genocide against people of color sound reasonable?

If this is about the idea that Jeremiah Wright has made plenty of wonderful statements during his life and has some redeeming qualities, that point has already been made.

CHIEF4EVER
03-26-2008, 06:49 AM
the stuff a lot of people are feigning outrage about

LMAO

Anyone on the left who has the stones to utter those word with a straight face clearly don't realize what the context of glass houses and rocks is. They have been using it as their M.O. for decades against anyone they disagree with on the right.

"Your CHICKENS have come HOOOOOME......to roost." LMAO

HonestChieffan
03-26-2008, 07:04 AM
Context cannot be used to justify and explain away this guys stands. I am sorry...anti-American, hate mongering, and ebracing the ideals of so called black theology is nothing more than a new dress on the same old whore.

Polish this turd all day and at the end of the day its still a turd. Hate and racial diatribes have been moved to the front of the issues list because of Obama and his beliefs.

Duck Dog
03-26-2008, 07:41 AM
Hate and racial diatribes have been moved to the front of the issues list because of Obama and his beliefs.

You got it right.

King_Chief_Fan
03-26-2008, 07:52 AM
Context cannot be used to justify and explain away this guys stands. I am sorry...anti-American, hate mongering, and ebracing the ideals of so called black theology is nothing more than a new dress on the same old whore.

Polish this turd all day and at the end of the day its still a turd. Hate and racial diatribes have been moved to the front of the issues list because of Obama and his beliefs.

100% agreement....... I think this thread is done.

Logical
03-26-2008, 07:55 AM
Every outrageous statement he made in this one makes sense now that it has been shown in context. Frankly I would like to hear the entire aids speech before I judge it.

Sully
03-26-2008, 08:20 AM
Every outrageous statement he made in this one makes sense now that it has been shown in context. Frankly I would like to hear the entire aids speech before I judge it.

It's a great sermon.
He went overboard a few times, using conspiracy theories as fact, but otherwise I was very impressed by the sermon.

chiefforlife
03-26-2008, 08:50 AM
I thought seeing it in context definitely took some of the sting out of it. Pretty good.

I liked the evasive maneuver on the way to the pulpit. Giving a sermon like that under sniper fire took great courage. He bravely instructed the flock to duck and run to their cars after church.

Radar Chief
03-26-2008, 09:06 AM
It's a great sermon.
He went overboard a few times, using conspiracy theories as fact, but otherwise I was very impressed by the sermon.

Thatís the whole problem as I see it and it isnít explained away by context.

Dave Lane
03-26-2008, 10:19 AM
Made ALOT more sense in context and can't say I disagree with what his point really was. Using hyperbole is probably wrong way to express his views but they are his views not Obamas and he is certainly entitled to his opinion.

Dave

Dave Lane
03-26-2008, 10:21 AM
Hate and racial diatribes have been moved to the front of the issues list because of the right wing nutjobs and their knee jerk reaction to anything "not patriotic".

FYP

Dave

The Mad Crapper
07-02-2011, 05:22 PM
LMAO

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/whites-are-liars-audacity-of-racism-obamas-20-year-mentor-rev-wright-tells-church-youth-all-whites-are-liars-over-and-over-in-a-long-sound-bite-2/

This is the POS who married Barry and Moochelle, and "baptised" Sasha and Malia.

KILLER_CLOWN
07-02-2011, 06:27 PM
Dr. Len Horowitz emerging viruses AIDS Ebola vaccines
Category:

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The Mad Crapper
07-02-2011, 06:46 PM
Dr. Len Horowitz emerging viruses AIDS Ebola vaccines
Category:

<object style/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390"></object>

You know, Killer Klown, I kinda like you... but around 5:40 of that videotape I was gonna stop and then post "what the fuck is this guy babbling about?" but no, I kept watching. I watch the entire thing.

So what the fuck was this guy babbling about?

Rockefeller?

Dude, I will never, ever open up another video you post.

KCBOSS1
07-02-2011, 06:53 PM
Giving Louis Farrakhan a lifetime achievement award from behind his pulpit is enough to convince me of his turdness.

patteeu
07-03-2011, 10:40 AM
LMAO

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/whites-are-liars-audacity-of-racism-obamas-20-year-mentor-rev-wright-tells-church-youth-all-whites-are-liars-over-and-over-in-a-long-sound-bite-2/

This is the POS who married Barry and Moochelle, and "baptised" Sasha and Malia.

Barack Obama didn't hear any of the controversial things Rev. Wright has ever said.

Chiefshrink
07-03-2011, 12:05 PM
Context?? Yeah damn right !!!! Let's get the "whoooooooooooooooooooooole context here and not fall for this Rev. Wright Rehabilitation Tour here, uh???

Black Liberation Theology- Nuff said.

Acton Home Ľ PUBLICATIONS Ľ Acton Commentary
The Marxist Roots of Black Liberation Theology
April 2, 2008

by Anthony B. Bradley

What is Black Liberation Theology anyway? Barack Obama's former pastor, Jeremiah Wright catapulted black liberation theology onto a national stage, when America discovered Trinity United Church of Christ. Understanding the background of the movement might give better clarity into Wright's recent vitriolic preaching. A clear definition of black theology was first given formulation in 1969 by the National Committee of Black Church Men in the midst of the civil-rights movement:

Black theology is a theology of black liberation. It seeks to plumb the black condition in the light of God's revelation in Jesus Christ, so that the black community can see that the gospel is commensurate with the achievements of black humanity. Black theology is a theology of 'blackness.' It is the affirmation of black humanity that emancipates black people from White racism, thus providing authentic freedom for both white and black people. It affirms the humanity of white people in that it says 'No' to the encroachment of white oppression.

In the 1960s, black churches began to focus their attention beyond helping blacks cope with national racial discrimination particularly in urban areas.

The notion of "blackness" is not merely a reference to skin color, but rather is a symbol of oppression that can be applied to all persons of color who have a history of oppression (except whites, of course). So in this sense, as Wright notes, "Jesus was a poor black man" because he lived in oppression at the hands of "rich white people." The overall emphasis of Black Liberation Theology is the black struggle for liberation from various forms of "white racism" and oppression.

James Cone, the chief architect of Black Liberation Theology in his book A Black Theology of Liberation (1970), develops black theology as a system. In this new formulation, Christian theology is a theology of liberation -- "a rational study of the being of God in the world in light of the existential situation of an oppressed community, relating the forces of liberation to the essence of the gospel, which is Jesus Christ," writes Cone. Black consciousness and the black experience of oppression orient black liberation theology -- i.e., one of victimization from white oppression.

One of the tasks of black theology, says Cone, is to analyze the nature of the gospel of Jesus Christ in light of the experience of oppressed blacks. For Cone, no theology is Christian theology unless it arises from oppressed communities and interprets Jesus' work as that of liberation. Christian theology is understood in terms of systemic and structural relationships between two main groups: victims (the oppressed) and victimizers (oppressors). In Cone's context, writing in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the great event of Christ's liberation was freeing African Americans from the centuries-old tyranny of white racism and white oppression.

American white theology, which Cone never clearly defines, is charged with having failed to help blacks in the struggle for liberation. Black theology exists because "white religionists" failed to relate the gospel of Jesus to the pain of being black in a white racist society.

For black theologians, white Americans do not have the ability to recognize the humanity in persons of color, blacks need their own theology to affirm their identity in terms of a reality that is anti-black -- “blackness” stands for all victims of white oppression. "White theology," when formed in isolation from the black experience, becomes a theology of white oppressors, serving as divine sanction from criminal acts committed against blacks. Cone argues that even those white theologians who try to connect theology to black suffering rarely utter a word that is relevant to the black experience in America. White theology is not Christian theology at all. There is but one guiding principle of black theology: an unqualified commitment to the black community as that community seeks to define its existence in the light of God's liberating work in the world.

As such, black theology is a survival theology because it helps blacks navigate white dominance in American culture. In Cone's view, whites consider blacks animals, outside of the realm of humanity, and attempted to destroy black identity through racial assimilation and integration programs--as if blacks have no legitimate existence apart from whiteness. Black theology is the theological expression of a people deprived of social and political power. God is not the God of white religion but the God of black existence. In Cone's understanding, truth is not objective but subjective -- a personal experience of the Ultimate in the midst of degradation.

The echoes of Cone's theology bleed through the now infamous, anti-Hilary excerpt by Rev. Wright. Clinton is among the oppressing class ("rich white people") and is incapable of understanding oppression ("ain't never been called a n-gg-r") but Jesus knows what it was like because he was "a poor black man" oppressed by "rich white people." While Black Liberation Theology is not main stream in most black churches, many pastors in Wright's generation are burdened by Cone's categories which laid the foundation for many to embrace Marxism and a distorted self-image of the perpetual "victim."

Black Liberation Theology as Marxist Victimology
Black Liberation Theology actually encourages a victim mentality among blacks. John McWhorters' book Losing the Race, will be helpful here. Victimology, says McWhorter, is the adoption of victimhood as the core of one's identity -- for example, like one who suffers through living in "a country and who lived in a culture controlled by rich white people." It is a subconscious, culturally inherited affirmation that life for blacks in America has been in the past and will be in the future a life of being victimized by the oppression of whites. In today's terms, it is the conviction that, 40 years after the Civil Rights Act, conditions for blacks have not substantially changed. As Wright intimates, for example, scores of black men regularly get passed over by cab drivers.

Reducing black identity to "victimhood" distorts the reality of true progress. For example, was Obama a victim of widespread racial oppression at the hand of "rich white people" before graduating from Columbia University, Harvard Law School magna cum laude, or after he acquired his estimated net worth of $1.3 million? How did "rich white people" keep Obama from succeeding? If Obama is the model of an oppressed black man, I want to be oppressed next! With my graduate school debt my net worth is literally negative $52,659.

The overall result, says McWhorter, is that "the remnants of discrimination hold an obsessive indignant fascination that allows only passing acknowledgement of any signs of progress." Jeremiah Wright, infused with victimology, wielded self-righteous indignation in the service of exposing the inadequacies Hilary Clinton's world of "rich white people." The perpetual creation of a racial identity born out of self-loathing and anxiety often spends more time inventing reasons to cry racism than working toward changing social mores, and often inhibits movement toward reconciliation and positive mobility.

McWhorter articulates three main objections to victimology: First, victimology condones weakness in failure. Victimology tacitly stamps approval on failure, lack of effort, and criminality. Behaviors and patterns that are self-destructive are often approved of as cultural or presented as unpreventable consequences from previous systemic patterns. Black Liberation theologians are clear on this point: "People are poor because they are victims of others," says Dr. Dwight Hopkins, a Black Liberation theologian teaching at the University of Chicago Divinity School.

Second, victimology hampers progress because, from the outset, it focuses attention on obstacles. For example, in Black liberation Theology, the focus is on the impediment of black freedom in light of the Goliath of white racism.

Third, victimology keeps racism alive because many whites are constantly painted as racist with no evidence provided. Racism charges create a context for backlash and resentment fueling new attitudes among whites not previously held or articulated, and creates "separatism" -- a suspension of moral judgment in the name of racial solidarity. Does Jeremiah Wright foster separatism or racial unity and reconciliation?

For Black Liberation theologians, Sunday is uniquely tied to redefining their sense of being human within a context of marginalization. "Black people who have been humiliated and oppressed by the structures of White society six days of the week gather together each Sunday morning in order to experience another definition of their humanity," says James Cone in his book Speaking the Truth (1999).

Many black theologians believe that both racism and socio-economic oppression continue to augment the fragmentation between whites and blacks. Historically speaking, it makes sense that black theologians would struggle with conceptualizing social justice and the problem of evil as it relates to the history of colonialism and slavery in the Americas.

Is Black Liberation Theology helping? Wright's liberation theology has stirred up resentment, backlash, Obama defections, separatism, white guilt, caricature, and offense. Preaching to a congregation of middle-class blacks about their victim identity invites a distorted view of reality, fosters nihilism, and divides rather than unites.

Black Liberation Is Marxist Liberation
One of the pillars of Obama's home church, Trinity United Church of Christ, is "economic parity." On the website, Trinity claims that God is not pleased with "America's economic mal-distribution." Among all of controversial comments by Jeremiah Wright, the idea of massive wealth redistribution is the most alarming. The code language "economic parity" and references to "mal-distribution" is nothing more than channeling the twisted economic views of Karl Marx. Black Liberation theologians have explicitly stated a preference for Marxism as an ethical framework for the black church because Marxist thought is predicated on a system of oppressor class (whites) versus victim class (blacks).

Black Liberation theologians James Cone and Cornel West have worked diligently to embed Marxist thought into the black church since the 1970s. For Cone, Marxism best addressed remedies to the condition of blacks as victims of white oppression. In For My People, Cone explains that "the Christian faith does not possess in its nature the means for analyzing the structure of capitalism. Marxism as a tool of social analysis can disclose the gap between appearance and reality, and thereby help Christians to see how things really are."

In God of the Oppressed, Cone said that Marx's chief contribution is "his disclosure of the ideological character of bourgeois thought, indicating the connections between the 'ruling material force of society' and the 'ruling intellectual' force." Marx's thought is useful and attractive to Cone because it allows black theologians to critique racism in America on the basis of power and revolution.

For Cone, integrating Marx into black theology helps theologians see just how much social perceptions determine theological questions and conclusions. Moreover, these questions and answers are "largely a reflection of the material condition of a given society."

In 1979, Cornel West offered a critical integration of Marxism and black theology in his essay, "Black Theology and Marxist Thought" because of the shared human experience of oppressed peoples as victims. West sees a strong correlation between black theology and Marxist thought because "both focus on the plight of the exploited, oppressed and degraded peoples of the world, their relative powerlessness and possible empowerment." This common focus prompts West to call for "a serious dialogue between Black theologians and Marxist thinkers" -- a dialogue that centers on the possibility of "mutually arrived-at political action."

In his book Prophesy Deliverance, West believes that by working together, Marxists and black theologians can spearhead much-needed social change for those who are victims of oppression. He appreciates Marxism for its "notions of class struggle, social contradictions, historical specificity, and dialectical developments in history" that explain the role of power and wealth in bourgeois capitalist societies. A common perspective among Marxist thinkers is that bourgeois capitalism creates and perpetuates ruling-class domination -- which, for black theologians in America, means the domination and victimization of blacks by whites. America has been over run by "White racism within mainstream establishment churches and religious agencies," writes West.

Perhaps it is the Marxism imbedded in Obama's attendance at Trinity Church that should raise red flags. "Economic parity" and "distribution" language implies things like government-coerced wealth redistribution, perpetual minimum wage increases, government subsidized health care for all, and the like. One of the priorities listed on Obama's campaign website reads, "Obama will protect tax cuts for poor and middle class families, but he will reverse most of the Bush tax cuts for the wealthiest taxpayers."

Black Liberation Theology, originally intended to help the black community, may have actually hurt many blacks by promoting racial tension, victimology, and Marxism which ultimately leads to more oppression. As the failed "War on Poverty" has exposed, the best way to keep the blacks perpetually enslaved to government as "daddy" is to preach victimology, Marxism, and to seduce blacks into thinking that upward mobility is someone else's responsibility in a free society.

Anthony B. Bradley is a research fellow at the Acton Institute, and assistant professor of theology at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis. His Ph.D. dissertation is titled, "Victimology in Black Liberation Theology." This article was originally published on the newsletter of the Glen Beck Program. Watch Bradley’s guest appearance on Beck’s CNN Headline News show here.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Buy Anthony Bradley's Book:

Liberating Black Theology - The Bible and the Black Experience in America
In this interdisciplinary, biblical critique of the black experience in America, Anthony Bradley introduces audiences to black liberation theology and its spiritual and social impact. He starts with James Cone's proposition that the "victim" mind-set is inherent within black consciousness. Bradley then explores how such biblical misinterpretation has historically hindered black churches in addressing the diverse issues of their communities and prevented adherents from experiencing the freedoms of the gospel. Yet Liberating Black Theology does more than consider the ramifications of this belief system; it suggests an alternate approach to the black experience that can truly liberate all Christ-followers.

Chiefshrink
07-03-2011, 12:07 PM
Barack Obama didn't hear any of the controversial things Rev. Wright has ever said.

Precisely:thumb:

Anybody who believes that BS deserves the "useful idiot" label:rolleyes:

Chiefshrink
07-03-2011, 12:09 PM
Thought this was interesting...

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It's a different picture when you get a chance to see the sound bite in some actual context.

And you are now an apologist now for Wright?:shrug:

RNR
07-03-2011, 02:07 PM
Giving Louis Farrakhan a lifetime achievement award from behind his pulpit is enough to convince me of his turdness.

This! You could put Farrakhan and Wright in a bag and spin it. If you swung a bat at it there is no way you hit the wrong one~

The Mad Crapper
07-03-2011, 05:02 PM
This! You could put Farrakhan and Wright in a bag and spin it. If you swung a bat at it there in no way you hit the wrong one~

Put Obuttocks in that bag as well. I'll even wear a blindfold.

scott free
07-04-2011, 11:51 AM
Giving Louis Farrakhan a lifetime achievement award from behind his pulpit is enough to convince me of his turdness.

Sooo, you disagree that the white race was created by an evil alien named Yakub to create terror on earth?