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pikesome
03-26-2008, 11:23 AM
Twenty-two percent (22%) of Democratic voters nationwide say that Hillary Clinton should drop out of the race for the Democratic Presidential nomination. However, the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey found that an identical number—22%--say that Barack Obama should drop out.

A solid majority of Democrats, 62%, aren’t ready for either candidate to leave the race. Nationally, Clinton and Obama are running essentially even among Likely Democratic Primary Voters in the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll.

Forty-seven percent (47%) of Obama supporters think Clinton should drop out. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Clinton supporters say Obama should drop out. Those who remain undecided are a bit more likely to suggest that Obama should leave. But, it’s worth noting that less than half of Obama supporters say Clinton should withdraw, less than half of Clinton supporters say Obama should withdraw, and less than half of undecided voters say either should withdraw at this time.

Clinton leads Obama in Pennsylvania while Obama leads Clinton in North Carolina. New polling released today show that both candidates have lost ground in Missouri to Republican John McCain over the past month.

Interestingly, Republicans are more eager to see Clinton drop out rather than Obama. Forty-one percent (41%) of GOP voters say the former First Lady should withdraw while just 24% say the same about the Senator from Illinois. Among unaffiliated voters, 30% say Clinton should drop out while 25% say the same about Obama.

Six percent (6%) of Democrats would like both Clinton and Obama to drop out of the race.

The national telephone survey also found that 85% of all Democrats—and 87% of all voters—believe it is at least somewhat likely the Democratic nomination will remain unresolved until the Democratic convention in August. Fifty-two percent (52%) of all Democrats believe that a decision at the convention is Very Likely.

Forty-seven percent (47%) of all voters say that Barack Obama would be the stronger general election candidate against John McCain. Thirty-five percent (35%) say Clinton would provide the bigger challenge. Among Democratic voters, 47% say Obama would be the stronger candidate while 42% say Clinton. Both Democrats currently trail John McCain nationally in the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll.

Fifty-four percent (54%) of all voters say that Obama is likely to win the nomination. Twenty-four percent (24%) say Clinton is the likely nominee while 22% are not sure. Among Democrats 52% expect Obama to win while 28% say Clinton.

Overall, the race for the White House remains very competitive. The Rasmussen Reports Balance of Power Calculator shows Democrats leading in states with 200 Electoral Votes while the GOP has the advantage in states with 189. When “leaners” are added, the Democrats lead 247 to 240. A Rasmussen Reports video analysis notes that while John McCain has had a great month of March, it takes a good day in November to win the White House.

Over the past month, McCain has gained ground in Missouri, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, Colorado, New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania. He leads both Democrats in North Carolina, Georgia and Arkansas. Both Democrats continue to lead in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut and California (see summary of recent state general election polling).

See survey questions and toplines. Crosstabs are available to Premium Members only.

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/election_20082/22_of_democrats_want_clinton_to_drop_out_22_say_obama_should_withdraw

recxjake
03-26-2008, 12:40 PM
Gallup: “Sizable proportion of Democrats” would vote for John McCain over Clinton or Obama

Gallup’s latest:

Clinton supporters who would vote for McCain over Obama = 28%

Obama supporters who would vote for McCain over Clinton = 19%

“The data suggest that the continuing and sometimes fractious Democratic nomination fight could have a negative impact for the Democratic Party in next November’s election. A not insignificant percentage of both Obama and Clinton supporters currently say they would vote for McCain if he ends up running against the candidate they do not support.”

StcChief
03-26-2008, 12:41 PM
Fight the good fight everbody, every minute, every day.

Sully
03-26-2008, 12:42 PM
Fight the good fight everbody, every minute, every day.

I am.
Thanks.

chiefforlife
03-26-2008, 12:44 PM
Why would a candidate leading in every category, withdraw?

Why was that even proposed to the people being polled?

Why not ask if McCain should drop out?

HolmeZz
03-26-2008, 12:47 PM
Obama's support generally gets underpolled usually due in part to the heavy youth vote and independent support.

memyselfI
03-26-2008, 01:19 PM
This is horrible news for the Obamaniacs. It's waaaaay too early for her to drop and this poll is evidence of why.

BucEyedPea
03-26-2008, 01:26 PM
Gallup: “Sizable proportion of Democrats” would vote for John McCain over Clinton or Obama

Gallup’s latest:

Clinton supporters who would vote for McCain over Obama = 28%

Obama supporters who would vote for McCain over Clinton = 19%

“The data suggest that the continuing and sometimes fractious Democratic nomination fight could have a negative impact for the Democratic Party in next November’s election. A not insignificant percentage of both Obama and Clinton supporters currently say they would vote for McCain if he ends up running against the candidate they do not support.”

What about the nomination of RR...I read that was contentious and RR still won. That was after an unpopular president too.

How accurate was Gallup about Rudy?

HolmeZz
03-26-2008, 01:29 PM
This is horrible news for the Obamaniacs. It's waaaaay too early for her to drop and this poll is evidence of why.

That her supporters want him to drop out so she can win?

ASTOUNDING

pikesome
03-26-2008, 01:38 PM
That her supporters want him to drop out so she can win?

ASTOUNDING

They need him to drop out so she can win.

HolmeZz
03-26-2008, 01:46 PM
They need him to drop out so she can win.

Yep, and that's the only reason the Clinton supporters are advocating it.

Ironically Meme used to say Obama supporters who were calling for Clinton to drop out were scared. Now that Clinton supporters are calling for Obama to drop out because they're scared, it signals trouble for Obama.

ClevelandBronco
03-26-2008, 01:49 PM
It all signals trouble for whichever one emerges from this mess.

BucEyedPea
03-26-2008, 01:50 PM
McCain has no money. Obama has no debt.

jAZ
03-26-2008, 02:25 PM
Gallup: “Sizable proportion of Democrats” would vote for John McCain over Clinton or Obama

Gallup’s latest:

Clinton supporters who would vote for McCain over Obama = 28%

Obama supporters who would vote for McCain over Clinton = 19%

“The data suggest that the continuing and sometimes fractious Democratic nomination fight could have a negative impact for the Democratic Party in next November’s election. A not insignificant percentage of both Obama and Clinton supporters currently say they would vote for McCain if he ends up running against the candidate they do not support.”
Two things...

1) 28% of Clinton supporters is about 14% of Democrats. Gore lost 14% of Dems and won the popular vote 2000.
2) Clinton supporters have a motivation to report (even falsely) that they wouldn't support Obama. It helps to make a case for their candidate to be the nominee.

The point is that this poll number today means very little to November. Not saying this fight is helpful, but keep it in perspective.

jAZ
03-26-2008, 02:26 PM
This is horrible news for the Obamaniacs. It's waaaaay too early for her to drop and this poll is evidence of why.

See?

patteeu
03-26-2008, 02:47 PM
Two things...

1) 28% of Clinton supporters is about 14% of Democrats. Gore lost 14% of Dems and won the popular vote 2000.
2) Clinton supporters have a motivation to report (even falsely) that they wouldn't support Obama. It helps to make a case for their candidate to be the nominee.

The point is that this poll number today means very little to November. Not saying this fight is helpful, but keep it in perspective.

That's exactly what I think when I hear most Obama fans talk about how they'd never vote for Hillary.

jAZ
03-26-2008, 03:07 PM
That's exactly what I think when I hear most Obama fans talk about how they'd never vote for Hillary.

I think it's true both ways, but the discrepency between the two numbers can possibly be traced to the fact that one of them (Obama) is the presumed nominee at the moment, and his supporters are able to feel more conciliatory at the moment. Where as Hillary's supporters need as many outside justifications for her nomination and thus are less willing to admit to their likelihood of ultimately being consiliatory.

They are more likely to SAY they won't support Obama than Obama supporters are to say the same about Hillary. But that ultimately when it all plays out, the exit polls will show that both candidates united more than 85% of the party behind them.

HolmeZz
03-26-2008, 03:09 PM
That's exactly what I think when I hear most Obama fans talk about how they'd never vote for Hillary.

A good chunk of Obama supporters aren't hardline Democrats and/or frequent voters.

BucEyedPea
03-26-2008, 03:18 PM
A good chunk of Obama supporters aren't hardline Democrats and/or frequent voters.

That's right because I'm a swing voter and have not entirely ruled him out.

patteeu
03-26-2008, 03:48 PM
I think it's true both ways, but the discrepency between the two numbers can possibly be traced to the fact that one of them (Obama) is the presumed nominee at the moment, and his supporters are able to feel more conciliatory at the moment. Where as Hillary's supporters need as many outside justifications for her nomination and thus are less willing to admit to their likelihood of ultimately being consiliatory.

They are more likely to SAY they won't support Obama than Obama supporters are to say the same about Hillary. But that ultimately when it all plays out, the exit polls will show that both candidates united more than 85% of the party behind them.

That's a reasonable theory, IMO.

patteeu
03-26-2008, 03:50 PM
A good chunk of Obama supporters aren't hardline Democrats and/or frequent voters.

I think there is a mixture. I think blacks as a general rule are about as hardline democrat as you can get. Youth are probably too wishy washy and inexperienced to be considered hardline anything.

Hillary probably has a mixture too. Pro-choice feminists are probably pretty hardline. Working class whites are probably less so.

memyselfI
03-26-2008, 04:36 PM
They need him to drop out so she can win.

No, that is not what the poll indicates. The poll indicates that EQUAL number of people want each of them to drop out so their candidate can win. If you have listened to the Obamaniacs and the media they would indicate that no one but the Clintons and the most die hard Clintonistas want them to keep fighting...

and yet, that is not the case.

memyselfI
03-26-2008, 04:40 PM
Two things...

1) 28% of Clinton supporters is about 14% of Democrats. Gore lost 14% of Dems and won the popular vote 2000.
2) Clinton supporters have a motivation to report (even falsely) that they wouldn't support Obama. It helps to make a case for their candidate to be the nominee.

The point is that this poll number today means very little to November. Not saying this fight is helpful, but keep it in perspective.

I am not falsely saying I would not support Obama. I would not support him even if Clinton were not involved in this. It's about being anti-Obama and not being pro-Clinton.

I think you are underestimating the sheer disdain that some Democrats feel for the fraud.

Adept Havelock
03-26-2008, 04:46 PM
I am not falsely saying I would not support Obama. I would not support him even if Clinton were not involved in this. It's about being anti-Obama and not being pro-Clinton.

I think you are underestimating the sheer disdain that some Democrats feel for the fraud.

My hunch is if Hillary loses the nomination, you and many of those Dems will find an "oh so reluctant" reason to pull that lever for Obama because of Supreme Court Justices. Which will only confirm what many of us already know, you're FOS. But hey, at least you're consistent about being FOS, if not the particular brand of feces you're currently oversupplied with.

jAZ
03-26-2008, 05:01 PM
I am not falsely saying I would not support Obama. I would not support him even if Clinton were not involved in this. It's about being anti-Obama and not being pro-Clinton.

I think you are underestimating the sheer disdain that some Democrats feel for the fraud.

I'm not saying the number would go to zero on either side. I trust you are in that 10% or so. Fine.

jAZ
03-26-2008, 05:04 PM
I am not falsely saying I would not support Obama. I would not support him even if Clinton were not involved in this. It's about being anti-Obama and not being pro-Clinton.

I think you are underestimating the sheer disdain that some Democrats feel for the fraud.

Keep in mind, even you were at one time considering voting for the guy that you were all along calling a fraud.

memyselfI
03-26-2008, 05:14 PM
My hunch is if Hillary loses the nomination, you and many of those Dems will find an "oh so reluctant" reason to pull that lever for Obama because of Supreme Court Justices. Which will only confirm what many of us already know, you're FOS. But hey, at least you're consistent about being FOS, if not the particular brand of feces you're currently oversupplied with.

Mike Gravel just switched to Independent and perhaps that is where I will end up because I cannot vote for Nader. I'll tear up my Democrat registration that I so proudly signed up for when I turned 18 and have coveted for 25 years.

I dutifully voted for the trainwrecks known as Dukakis and Kerry. I refuse to do it a third time. Like I said before, if Obamessiah loses because of my one vote then so be it.

memyselfI
03-26-2008, 05:15 PM
Keep in mind, even you were at one time considering voting for the guy that you were all along calling a fraud.

Yes, before I did my research. Now I'm an informed voter. I'll pass.

jAZ
03-26-2008, 05:29 PM
Yes, before I did my research. Now I'm an informed voter. I'll pass.
Did you just admit to constantly railing against Obama and calling him a fraud, while all the while holding an ignorant and uninformed opinion?

That's odd.

memyselfI
03-26-2008, 08:10 PM
Did you just admit to constantly railing against Obama and calling him a fraud, while all the while holding an ignorant and uninformed opinion?

That's odd.

No. You said I considered voting for him and I agreed that was before I did my research on him. I only truly started to rail against him when it became apparent he'd be one of the finalists.

a1na2
03-26-2008, 08:13 PM
Yes, before I did my research. Now I'm an informed voter. I'll pass.

That's paramount to Hillary claiming to be a human being.

patteeu
03-27-2008, 12:42 AM
That's paramount to Hillary claiming to be a human being.

tantamount

HolmeZz
03-27-2008, 12:46 AM
pantamount

whoman69
03-27-2008, 04:35 PM
Gallup: “Sizable proportion of Democrats” would vote for John McCain over Clinton or Obama

Gallup’s latest:

Clinton supporters who would vote for McCain over Obama = 28%

Obama supporters who would vote for McCain over Clinton = 19%

“The data suggest that the continuing and sometimes fractious Democratic nomination fight could have a negative impact for the Democratic Party in next November’s election. A not insignificant percentage of both Obama and Clinton supporters currently say they would vote for McCain if he ends up running against the candidate they do not support.”

Horse hockey. They are blowing smoke up their own backsides now, but when the time comes to pull that lever they will realize that voting for McCain is like giving a third term to Bush.

I personally think the closeness of the race against McCain right now is a mirage. He does not have to run against anyone right now, while the Democrats are continuing to beat themselves over the head. Does anyone forget how many more people were voting on the Democratic side in the primaries and caucus when there was a race for the Republicans? Right now the luster has worn off the Democratic candidates. That doesn't change the fact that in some races there were four times as many voting on some of the Democratic races than in the Republican.