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View Full Version : Low stress, good pay, enjoyable work: which is least important?


cdcox
03-26-2008, 10:14 PM
Low stress and reasonable hours, good pay, enjoyable work: which is least important?

Demonpenz
03-26-2008, 10:16 PM
if you find a job you love you will never have to work a day in your life

-ted nugent

Extra Point
03-26-2008, 10:17 PM
I want to play drums for Uncle Ted.

Iowanian
03-26-2008, 10:17 PM
I don't know....I started working for myself and now have high stress, ridiculous hours and deadlines(like the one I should be working on now) and lower pay due to reinvestment and startup cost. Eventually, I'll like what I do better.

Add a newborn and other committements........

I think I should watch Multiplicity....and make 2 copies of myself.....only 2 copies.


Anyone have an icepick I can borrow to stab into my temple?


I'll do it every day if I have to for a better, lower stress life for my little ladies.

Rausch
03-26-2008, 10:20 PM
I'll star in "Two Gaz's one cup" for 50k a year.

You guess what dot I clicked...

KcMizzou
03-26-2008, 10:26 PM
Enjoyable work.

With low stress, and good pay... it's really easy to get over the fact that you're not crazy about your job.

Guru
03-26-2008, 10:29 PM
Enjoyable work.

With low stress, and good pay... it's really easy to get over the fact that you're not not crazy about your job.

Ditto

cdcox
03-26-2008, 10:35 PM
Right now I make good pay, and like my work, but it can be pretty stressful and long hours at times.

I may get the chance to reduce my stress level, but will probably have to give up something I like doing. May get a bump in guaranteed pay. Could limit my chances for future career growth if I don't play things right. Trying to decide if that is what I want to do, if I get the chance.

cdcox
03-26-2008, 10:38 PM
In the last 20 years, I can count on one hand the number of times I've woken up and said "Oh sh*t, it's Monday.

But the high level of stress is a bit of a grind, even if I enjoy each day individually.

Jenson71
03-26-2008, 10:43 PM
Enjoyable work.

That's the one thing your own attitude can affect it seems. Tell yourself, hey I don't have much stress, I get a good salary, I have reasonable hours. Don't be so greedy.

88TG88
03-26-2008, 10:44 PM
At this point in my life I would say stress/reasonable hours.

Rausch
03-26-2008, 10:46 PM
At this point in my life I would say stress/reasonable hours.

Of course you'd say that.

You're looking to maximize boner time...

Fish
03-26-2008, 10:53 PM
Pimpin ain't easy.......

88TG88
03-26-2008, 11:08 PM
Of course you'd say that.

You're looking to maximize boner time...

ROFL

Logical
03-26-2008, 11:15 PM
Truthfully I enjoy the stress, but that is just me.

Rausch
03-26-2008, 11:16 PM
Truthfully I enjoy the stress, but that is just me.

Do you have kids?

BWillie
03-26-2008, 11:19 PM
It's all relative. If I had a job where I made 200K, I really would accept as shitty and bad as it may be. If I have a job that I make 25K, I would expect it to be easy and not stressful.

Right now I wish I could find a job where they can pay me per diem to travel, be available any day of the year including christmas, and be away from home for weeks at a time.

Rausch
03-26-2008, 11:24 PM
If I have a job that I make 25K, I would expect it to be easy and not stressful.

Uh...based on what?


Any job under 25k is stressful, low paying, and odds are working your azz off.

BWillie
03-26-2008, 11:28 PM
Uh...based on what?


Any job under 25k is stressful, low paying, and odds are working your azz off.

One of my friends is a customer service person at health insurance company. He makes like 24 grand. He does nothing pretty much all day. He gets like four calls an hour, and in the meantime surfs the internet or listens to his i-pod.

I think the point you were trying to make though is that by having a low paying job doesn't mean low stress or high stress and vice versa. That wasn't what I was getting it. I would just say I could handle a job's stress if I made more money..so I guess what I'm saying is no matter what. I'd take the money #1, unless I was working like 65 hours a week.

Frazod
03-26-2008, 11:31 PM
I'd say the answer one gives is very dependent on the person and their experiences.

For me, I hate working in a place where I'm miserable (and God knows I've had more than my fair share of that). My current job is about as far from exciting as you can get, but I make decent money and with few exceptions really like the people I work with. Not so much enjoyable work, but an enjoyable environment with good people makes all the difference to me.

I've been at my current job for 8 years now, which is the longest I've ever been at one company by a vast margin. I'm happy and have no plans to leave.

Rausch
03-26-2008, 11:38 PM
One of my friends is a customer service person at health insurance company. He makes like 24 grand. He does nothing pretty much all day. He gets like four calls an hour, and in the meantime surfs the internet or listens to his i-pod.

If you have to make $#it that's the way to do it.

I think the point you were trying to make though is that by having a low paying job doesn't mean low stress or high stress and vice versa.

No, I mean the more you make the less you work. Responsibility is draining but it's not drag-your-ass-home-dead draining. On top of that the lower end of the pay scale means odds are you're working with morons. Not just new or inexperienced people, but ****ing idiots.

Intelligent people work their asses off early so they don't have to later. Dumbasses slack off early and spend the rest of their lives working their asses off...

Logical
03-27-2008, 12:49 AM
Do you have kids?Yes but they are all in their 20s now.

1adam1238
03-27-2008, 04:11 AM
The older I get the amount of money I make means less than those other things.

a1na2
03-27-2008, 05:11 AM
if you find a job you love you will never have to work a day in your life

-ted nugent

I don't think that Ted said this one, but then it's your story... go with it.

eazyb81
03-27-2008, 07:56 AM
Maybe it's because I'm still fairly young, but the whole low stress/easy job thing is extremely unimportant to me. From what I've seen, you have to work hard and pay your dues early on to get ahead in an industry. If it's a job you enjoy, why wouldn't you want to give it your all?

Demonpenz
03-27-2008, 08:15 AM
what is funny is when i got out of a job where i hated the people, the work etc then i got somewhere where it wasn't as shitty I understand the importance of not hating your job. I wish I was able to to spend as much time with my family as I do with work.

ChiefButthurt
03-27-2008, 09:42 AM
If work was supposed to be fun, that's what they'd call it.

morphius
03-27-2008, 10:16 AM
I'd agree with KcMizzou and toss in that if you work with fun people, bad jobs can be fun.

Otter
03-27-2008, 10:18 AM
Find the mean between what makes you happiest now and what you think will bring you the best outcome in end game. Money is a precursor to being happy but by no means a guarantee.

And what it comes down to before we're all worm food is being happy in the days you're given.

I've learned that from men better than me and try to include that advice in my decisions.

Sure-Oz
03-27-2008, 10:20 AM
Enjoyable work as well, if i got paid real good i would be just fine....$$$ is what keeps me going

Pestilence
03-27-2008, 10:40 AM
In the last 20 years, I can count on one hand the number of times I've woken up and said "Oh sh*t, it's Monday.

But the high level of stress is a bit of a grind, even if I enjoy each day individually.

Dude I wake up and say "Oh sh*t, it's Thursday".

Simply Red
03-27-2008, 10:58 AM
enjoyable wk.

DTLB58
03-27-2008, 11:06 AM
I think it depends on the indiviual and where he or she is in their life right now. If your single or married probably has a lot to do with it, so you are free to spend time with the kids and see them at their school/sports activities.

Right now I am making more money than I ever have, all in all it's probably considered low stress (I make it high stress sometimes because I'm anal about some things). I am in a situation where the O.T. is voluntary so above 40 hours I can choose what my hours will be in a week. The work is getting boring just because I have done the same type of thing for 16 years now but I enjoy what I do.

Right now for me it's more about the money. Looking at retiring in 20 years or less we want to get our house paid off in the next 5-10 years and keep socking it away. I want to retire with dignity.

Some books on the subject I would recommend.
48 hours to the work you love and No More Mondays both by Dan Miller.

My advice would be, when you are young find something you love and then find a way to make money at it. There's a reason why Sunday night and Monday mornings are the most likely time for middle aged men to committ suicide.

bogey
03-27-2008, 11:06 AM
Gosh, I wish I loved my work. I work for the paycheck, not because I love it. However, I have a lifestyle that requires X amount of money and I don't think I can make the money I make in another field. My wife and daughter are happy and that makes me happy. Also, I do love my week-ends. I know, I know, let the violins start playing. But honestly, I'm not doing what I love.

Rain Man
03-27-2008, 11:21 AM
The results so far shock me. I would've bet that stress would be the runaway winner. Give me a job that I like and that pays well, and I can deal with stress. Stress also just kind of means that your role is important.

Now look at the other two combinations. First, a job that I liked and was low stress, but didn't pay well is tolerable, but there are practical considerations. I like to travel and I want to retire at some point. Short term, this job would be fine, but long term, it wouldn't.

The other combination would be a job that paid well and was low-stress, but unenjoyable. I think you've just described life on an assembly line in Detroit. Man, that would drive me nuts. The fact that I didn't enjoy it would create lots of stress in the long run, and money wouldn't be enough to make up for it.

I'm really surprised that more people would prefer the third job than either of the other two.

keg in kc
03-27-2008, 11:40 AM
Of those three, probably enjoyable work. Money's too important and stress shortens your life. But a job you don't enjoy probably raises your stress, so it all evens out.

stevieray
03-27-2008, 11:59 AM
good pay.

BucEyedPea
03-27-2008, 12:21 PM
Stress is usually part of good pay with some exceptions like teaching.
I chose stress as the least important. But reasonable hours are important to a mom, or should be imo.

morphius
03-27-2008, 12:30 PM
The results so far shock me. I would've bet that stress would be the runaway winner. Give me a job that I like and that pays well, and I can deal with stress. Stress also just kind of means that your role is important.

Now look at the other two combinations. First, a job that I liked and was low stress, but didn't pay well is tolerable, but there are practical considerations. I like to travel and I want to retire at some point. Short term, this job would be fine, but long term, it wouldn't.

The other combination would be a job that paid well and was low-stress, but unenjoyable. I think you've just described life on an assembly line in Detroit. Man, that would drive me nuts. The fact that I didn't enjoy it would create lots of stress in the long run, and money wouldn't be enough to make up for it.

I'm really surprised that more people would prefer the third job than either of the other two.
If it was just stress I would have went that route, but stress and long hours is hard to do.

Frosty
03-27-2008, 12:46 PM
I took a job in the sticks where I made a lot less as an engineer than I could have in Portland or Seattle, but I don't have to deal with crowds, crime and traffic or have to work 60 hour weeks. Worth it to me.

kregger
03-27-2008, 12:59 PM
The medical field has inherent stress. Easy choice.

sedated
03-27-2008, 01:05 PM
A stressful job has relief when you go home.

Being broke is stress 24/7.

cdcox
03-27-2008, 03:18 PM
The results so far shock me. I would've bet that stress would be the runaway winner. Give me a job that I like and that pays well, and I can deal with stress. Stress also just kind of means that your role is important.

Now look at the other two combinations. First, a job that I liked and was low stress, but didn't pay well is tolerable, but there are practical considerations. I like to travel and I want to retire at some point. Short term, this job would be fine, but long term, it wouldn't.

The other combination would be a job that paid well and was low-stress, but unenjoyable. I think you've just described life on an assembly line in Detroit. Man, that would drive me nuts. The fact that I didn't enjoy it would create lots of stress in the long run, and money wouldn't be enough to make up for it.

I'm really surprised that more people would prefer the third job than either of the other two.

Up to this point in my life, this would pretty much sum it up for me. I can deal with the occasional long hours and stress becuase the job is fun and rewarding. I make a decent living, but I'm not rich by any means.

Right now I'm in the middle of stringing together 80 hour weeks working on a proposal while managing two or three other tasks at the same time. I'm not sure what the funding odds are, but hopefully they are at least 1 in 3 (which is better than normal). If I don't get funded, all of this work will have been for nothing. If it does get funded, I'll have even more work to do, but at least I won't have to write a proposal for a year or two.

My responsibilities have increased over the last year or so to the point where a few things are starting to leak through the cracks. I may get the chance to take on additional responsibility, but in order to do that I'd have to give up something, there is just no way I could keep doing everthing I'm doing now plus the new responsibilities. The new responsibilities are important, would increase my leadership position, take a large time commitment, but would be fairly routine (less stress).

This kind of move is something I've thought about doing in 8 to 10 years, near the end of my career when I'm ready to slow down a bit. I'm just not sure I'm ready to get out of the fast lane just yet. OTOH, at this moment a little simpler life sounds pretty good.

Rain Man
03-27-2008, 04:01 PM
On the positive side, cdcox, it's nice that you're getting opportunities. Even if you like a job, it's always nice to know that you've got the chance to do something different if you wanted.

Would this be a move to an admin position? Or would it be something like managing a grant that would pull you out of teaching or writing or whatever else you professors do in your offices?

acesn8s
03-27-2008, 04:31 PM
It's all relative. If I had a job where I made 200K, I really would accept as shitty and bad as it may be. If I have a job that I make 25K, I would expect it to be easy and not stressful.

Right now I wish I could find a job where they can pay me per diem to travel, be available any day of the year including christmas, and be away from home for weeks at a time.
Become an OTR truck driver.

Bearcat
03-27-2008, 05:36 PM
I've lost sleep over such a question.

At my last job in KC, I had relatively low stress with good pay and was bored out of my mind. At my current job, I have a lot more stress, good pay, and I love what I do. It was the decision between a stable and 'comfortable' career and a less stable and borderline chaotic career.

What I found interesting was that most of the baby boomers at my last job didn't understand why I wouldn't choose stability and low stress, while most of my coworkers around my age would have jumped at the opportunity themselves.

I think some of it has to do with the generation gap... it's the difference between 'work is work, it's not supposed to be enjoyable' and 'if I'm going to spend 1/3 of my life here, it better be enjoyable'.

Pestilence
03-27-2008, 05:44 PM
A stressful job has relief when you go home.

Being broke is stress 24/7.

QFT

Rain Man
03-27-2008, 06:00 PM
Similar to Bearcat, I long ago had a job as an engineer that paid decently and was very low-stress. The work was even interesting. However, I couldn't stand it because there was no sense of accomplishment at all. I never saw a client, I never really had pressure to perform, and really had a pretty low-arcing career path even if I was successful. I had to get out of there.

My parents were like, "What are you doing, dude? Easy money, stable, no pressure. Stay there forever." Uh-uh. I was 26 years old, and I was already figuring out how long until I could retire. That was pretty pathetic. No way could I have slogged through another 25 or so years of that. I couldn't have made it.

Of course, it ended up not being stable and I got laid off, but by then it didn't matter so much because I'd already been accepted into graduate school.