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Easy 6
04-01-2008, 07:01 PM
Has anyone seen this movie yet??? and if so, what did you think???...i searched for a thread & didnt find one.

I was moved by this film more than any other in years, i have a huge bag of mixed feelings about him.

Since watching it, i find myself looking & wondering where my youthful idealism & wanderlust has went...am i getting old, rotten & swept away by the material world???...stuck in a rut of my own making???

I was living in Fairbanks Alaska during the time he was going through his ordeal in the bus & vaguely remember reading about it in the Fairbanks paper. That somehow makes me feel connected to him in some, belated, way.

Was he selfish, for causing so much pain in the lives of those who loved him???...or did he deserve, as maybe we all do, to seek his own destiny...free from the guilt, responsibility & trappings of modern life???

I feel SO much admiration for what he did, it takes huevos like boulders to set out like he did at such a young age with nothing but a backpack, the strength of his own character & a youthful appreciation for the for the simple, yet incredibly beautiful...simple pleasures of life. He could have been a Trust Fund Baby, yet chose to throw it all away for the experiences that money CANT buy.

After watching it, i honestly cried...for him, his family & loved ones...and also for myself...wondering if i could ever recapture that feeling of youthful idealism.

I cannot recommend this movie more highly, if you hate Sean Penn (the director)...dont let that stop you, its an amazing testament. Its loaded with standout performances, perhaps the best of which was delivered by Hal Holbrook...he'll break your heart in this, his final performance.

This movie wrapped itself around my soul & has made me question everything i was & have become...do yourself a favor & rent it.

evolve27
04-01-2008, 07:14 PM
Touching movie, actually bought a tear to my eye as well Scott. One way or another I could relate to what McCandless was enduring and felt empathy towards his journey. I want to read the book to see how it differs. I think it would be cool to venture into the serenity and beauty of wilderness, prepared.

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 07:24 PM
Touching movie. I want to read the book to see how it differs. I think it would be cool to venture into the serenity and beauty of wilderness, prepared.

From what i've read, they stayed very close to the book...or as close as you can in a movie. Apparently, the family was deeply involved in the making of it, from what i've read.

I think it would be awesome to just get lost in the wilderness for awhile to, ala SurvivorMan, but like you say...i'd wanna be more prepared...he thought a few helpful hints, a bag of rice & a 22 rifle would carry him through.

The movie just really helped me question my life & whats important about it.

evolve27
04-01-2008, 07:33 PM
From what i've read, they stayed very close to the book...or as close as you can in a movie. Apparently, the family was deeply involved in the making of it, from what i've read.

I think it would be awesome to just get lost in the wilderness for awhile to, ala SurvivorMan, but like you say...i'd wanna be more prepared...he thought a few helpful hints, a bag of rice & a 22 rifle would carry him through.

The movie just really helped me question my life & whats important about it.

Material objects tend to obscure this contemporary generations sense of being. I believe like McCandless if we get away from it we can find a higher sense of self actualization and worth. Nature is one of the best ways wecan provide a solace from these feelings or estrangements that society has valued.

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 07:39 PM
Material objects tend to obscure this contemporary generations sense of being. I believe like McCandless if we get away from it we can find a higher sense of self actualization and worth. Nature is one of the best ways wecan provide a solace from these feelings or estrangements that society has valued.


No doubt about it, thats maybe the most important message in this movie...dont let material possessions define you, when you remove all of it...the only thing left is your integrity, the love of family & friends & being able to appreciate the grandeur of Gods world.

evolve27
04-01-2008, 07:47 PM
No doubt about it, thats maybe the most important message in this movie...dont let material possessions define you, when you remove all of it...the only thing left is your integrity, the love of family & friends & being able to appreciate the grandeur of Gods world.

I agree, those are the closest things you can value. I'm gonna go trout fishing this weekend and get away from the world a little bit, it's gonna feel good too. Have you been back to Alaska?, nothing bite like them Alaskan Pollack evident by the biggest supply of fish in the frozen department.

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 08:04 PM
I agree, those are the closest things you can value. I'm gonna go trout fishing this weekend and get away from the world a little bit, it's gonna feel good too. Have you been back to Alaska?, nothing bite like them Alaskan Pollack evident by the biggest supply of fish in the frozen department.

Nah, i havent been back to AK but i would sure love to...theres more than enough beauty & danger to go around. The summers are just awesome.

I made some beer batter fried pollock last week...but it was a "Product of China"...:cuss::cuss::cuss:...i'll go without before i buy chinese again.

Good luck fishing, enjoy the serenity.

macdawg
04-01-2008, 08:17 PM
"Was he selfish, for causing so much pain in the lives of those who loved him???...or did he deserve, as maybe we all do, to seek his own destiny...free from the guilt, responsibility & trappings of modern life???"

Of course he was selfish for causing harm, I respect the heck outta him but he was weird. Why didn't he dream of being a provider, a father to a family he could raise and share his ideas with? Everyone in this world has crap to deal with in the modern world. He could have done so much more, I don't think his destiny was to abandon society because he was too hard headed to throw a curve ball right back at it.

sd4chiefs
04-01-2008, 08:20 PM
Movie reviews

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/into_the_wild/

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 08:25 PM
"Was he selfish, for causing so much pain in the lives of those who loved him???...or did he deserve, as maybe we all do, to seek his own destiny...free from the guilt, responsibility & trappings of modern life???"

Of course he was selfish for causing harm, I respect the heck outta him but he was weird. Why didn't he dream of being a provider, a father to a family he could raise and share his ideas with? Everyone in this world has crap to deal with in the modern world. He could have done so much more, I don't think his destiny was to abandon society because he was too hard headed to throw a curve ball right back at it.

Interesting take Mac.

I guess that we cant all have the same dreams, but he was so young that he maybe wasnt sure what his dreams were. I totally agree that he could have been/done so much more.

The last words in his journal lead me to believe that he grasped his mistake at the very end..."Happiness is only real, when shared...".

Chiefmanwillcatch
04-01-2008, 08:34 PM
Movie about a clown who secretly wanted to die for 'fame'.

This story and movie appeal to stupid whiteboys. Do you see a movie about a native alaskan that can handle that territory.........no.

Asinine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless


Unlike Krakauer and many readers, who have a largely sympathetic view of McCandless,<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[13] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-12)</sup> some Alaskans have negative views and about those who romanticize his fate.<sup id="cite_ref-matthew_power_5-1" class="reference">[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-matthew_power-5)</sup><sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[14] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-13)</sup> Because he had no maps, McCandless was unaware a hand-operated tram crossed the impassable river 1/4 mile from where he attempted to cross.<sup id="cite_ref-Krakauer_2-1" class="reference">[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-Krakauer-2)</sup> There were cabins stocked with emergency supplies within a few miles of the bus, although they had been vandalized and all the supplies were spoiled, possibly by McCandless, as detailed in Lamothe's documentary.
Alaskan Park Ranger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Ranger) Peter Christian wrote: “I am exposed continually to what I will call the ‘McCandless Phenomenon.’ People, nearly always young men, come to Alaska to challenge themselves against an unforgiving wilderness landscape where convenience of access and possibility of rescue are practically nonexistent […] When you consider McCandless from my perspective, you quickly see that what he did wasn’t even particularly daring, just stupid, tragic, and inconsiderate. First off, he spent very little time learning how to actually live in the wild. He arrived at the Stampede Trail without even a map (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Map) of the area. If he [had] had a good map (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topographic_map) he could have walked out of his predicament […] Essentially, Chris McCandless committed suicide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide).”<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[15] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-14)</sup>

Rausch
04-01-2008, 08:35 PM
"Was he selfish, for causing so much pain in the lives of those who loved him???...or did he deserve, as maybe we all do, to seek his own destiny...free from the guilt, responsibility & trappings of modern life???"

Of course he was selfish for causing harm, I respect the heck outta him but he was weird. Why didn't he dream of being a provider, a father to a family he could raise and share his ideas with? Everyone in this world has crap to deal with in the modern world. He could have done so much more, I don't think his destiny was to abandon society because he was too hard headed to throw a curve ball right back at it.

I haven't seen the flick. Did he already have a young family (wife, kids, etc.) or was he still a kid/teen that pretty much just ran away?...

JBucc
04-01-2008, 08:43 PM
Well after studying this man in great depth (reading his Wikipedia page), he seems like a dumbass. He didn't even bring a map with him.

Rausch
04-01-2008, 08:50 PM
Well after studying this man in great depth (reading his Wikipedia page), he seems like a dumbass. He didn't even bring a map with him.

How about TP?

It always seems like as soon as I step foot in the woods I have to drop2...

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 08:54 PM
Movie about a clown who secretly wanted to die for 'fame'.

This story and movie appeal to stupid whiteboys. Do you see a movie about a native alaskan that can handle that territory.........no.

Asinine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless


Unlike Krakauer and many readers, who have a largely sympathetic view of McCandless,<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[13] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-12)</sup> some Alaskans have negative views and about those who romanticize his fate.<sup id="cite_ref-matthew_power_5-1" class="reference">[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-matthew_power-5)</sup><sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[14] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-13)</sup> Because he had no maps, McCandless was unaware a hand-operated tram crossed the impassable river 1/4 mile from where he attempted to cross.<sup id="cite_ref-Krakauer_2-1" class="reference">[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-Krakauer-2)</sup> There were cabins stocked with emergency supplies within a few miles of the bus, although they had been vandalized and all the supplies were spoiled, possibly by McCandless, as detailed in Lamothe's documentary.
Alaskan Park Ranger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Ranger) Peter Christian wrote: “I am exposed continually to what I will call the ‘McCandless Phenomenon.’ People, nearly always young men, come to Alaska to challenge themselves against an unforgiving wilderness landscape where convenience of access and possibility of rescue are practically nonexistent […] When you consider McCandless from my perspective, you quickly see that what he did wasn’t even particularly daring, just stupid, tragic, and inconsiderate. First off, he spent very little time learning how to actually live in the wild. He arrived at the Stampede Trail without even a map (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Map) of the area. If he [had] had a good map (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topographic_map) he could have walked out of his predicament […] Essentially, Chris McCandless committed suicide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suicide).”<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[15] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_McCandless#cite_note-14)</sup>

I've read things of a similar nature about this & its hard to disagree with some points.

But to dismiss him as an idiot who basically deserved what he got is TOTAL horseshit...would you feel the same if it were YOUR son???

The forest service people up there are tired of chasing/looking after guys like Chris & thats understandable...but they've become jaded & cant understand what drives people like him to undertake the ultimate adventure.

To write it off as suicide is whats truly assinine, this was a young man who wanted NOTHING more than to live life to its ultimate fullest.

He had the soul of a poet & the balls of a bull...clown your ass.

chop
04-01-2008, 09:02 PM
I haven't seen the flick. Did he already have a young family (wife, kids, etc.) or was he still a kid/teen that pretty much just ran away?...

I saw the movie and he wasn't married. He just graduated from college and decided to embark on his voyage.

Apparently, right before he died he realized that happiness was sharing joyous moments with the ones you love. Too bad, once he learned this lesson, it was too late for him.

It seemed as though he had people that cared very much for him. I think he was selfish to turn his back on all of those people but I guess he needed to make his own way in the world.

stlchiefs
04-01-2008, 09:10 PM
I'll admit I haven't seen the movie, but have no desire to. My fiancee has wanted to see it since it first came out but after her explanation about the movie I thought he was an idiot and had no desire to see the movie. After reading further about the story my opinion stands.

The spoiled kid desired adventure, but he was too dumb to survive in the elements and I'm supposed to find meaning and sorrow in this. BS. Here's something I learned as a cub scout: "Be Prepared".

This may seem harsh and I mean no disrespect to those who enjoyed the movie as I'm sure there are many movies I enjoy that others would find very lame, but I don't see the value in watching a movie about an ill-prepared kid who ran away and died because he couldn't survive the elements he traveled to.

Rausch
04-01-2008, 09:12 PM
I saw the movie and he wasn't married. He just graduated from college and decided to embark on his voyage.

You're an adult by then.

I don't blame a guy for doing what he dreams (even if it is moronic.)

Apparently, right before he died he realized that happiness was sharing joyous moments with the ones you love. Too bad, once he learned this lesson, it was too late for him.

Sounds like most people I know.

It seemed as though he had people that cared very much for him. I think he was selfish to turn his back on all of those people but I guess he needed to make his own way in the world.

Sounds like any young kid fresh out of college.

Perhaps the story wasn't about some brilliant naturalist kid.
Perhaps just an allegory...:Poke:

Cardinal Ry
04-01-2008, 09:13 PM
Read the book! It is a great read. The movie was okay but the book really goes into people with the mindset of McCandles. Krakauer is a really good author and really gives you an insight into this story.

Brock
04-01-2008, 09:15 PM
I do feel sorry for the kid. He didn't have to die, if he'd just been prepared.

Deberg_1990
04-01-2008, 09:19 PM
How did Sean Penn choose to represent McCandless?? Was he For the war in Iraq or against it?? :)

Rausch
04-01-2008, 09:22 PM
I do feel sorry for the kid. He didn't have to die, if he'd just been prepared.

I wouldn't have pegged you to be sympathetic on this one.

KCrockaholic
04-01-2008, 09:22 PM
This was a very good movie, i watched it in school just a couple weeks ago and i knew nothing about it until i saw it. It started off kinda weird but it was actually a very good story, and i would recommend it for anyone.

evolve27
04-01-2008, 09:26 PM
Nah, i havent been back to AK but i would sure love to...theres more than enough beauty & danger to go around. The summers are just awesome.

I made some beer batter fried pollock last week...but it was a "Product of China"...:cuss::cuss::cuss:...i'll go without before i buy chinese again.

Good luck fishing, enjoy the serenity.

I don't see the fascination with imported Chinese Pollack. I'll keep that in mind if I'm ever cornered to buying it. It's taking over the market from what I've read. We'll see if I don't snag anything I might go on a trail or something taking with me some lessons from Les Stroud on how to survive. It'll be fun regardless.

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 09:27 PM
I'll admit I haven't seen the movie, but have no desire to. My fiancee has wanted to see it since it first came out but after her explanation about the movie I thought he was an idiot and had no desire to see the movie. After reading further about the story my opinion stands.

The spoiled kid desired adventure, but he was too dumb to survive in the elements and I'm supposed to find meaning and sorrow in this. BS. Here's something I learned as a cub scout: "Be Prepared".

This may seem harsh and I mean no disrespect to those who enjoyed the movie as I'm sure there are many movies I enjoy that others would find very lame, but I don't see the value in watching a movie about an ill-prepared kid who ran away and died because he couldn't survive the elements he traveled to.

You should read the book or see the movie...maybe it will, maybe it wont change your mind.

I'm not arguing that he wasnt naive or ill-prepared...but to me, thats not really the point...the point is that a young man who could've taken the easy way out, instead chose a life of wandering fulfillment...he reduced life to its bare essentials.

Its my opinion, that all of us could learn a thing or two about life from such a free-spirited & brave young man...he learned more about life in 24 short years than many of us will learn in a lifetime. I honestly feel that modern life strips us of much of lifes meaning.

Yes, i'm romanticizing it some...but what the hell, i'm a bit of a romantic.

And now, more than ever...am proud of it.

Rausch
04-01-2008, 09:31 PM
I'm not arguing that he wasnt naive or ill-prepared...but to me, thats not really the point...the point is that a young man who could've taken the easy way out, instead chose a life of wandering fulfillment...he reduced life to its bare essentials.

Its my opinion, that all of us could learn a thing or two about life from such a free-spirited & brave young man...he learned more about life in 24 short years than many of us will learn in a lifetime. I honestly feel that modern life strips us of much of lifes meaning.

Yes, i'm romanticizing it some...but what the hell, i'm a bit of a romantic.

And now, more than ever...am proud of it.

So buy a cabin in the woods, read some Thoreau, and BRING A MAP...:)

Deberg_1990
04-01-2008, 09:31 PM
So let me see if i get this story straight:

A young, spoiled kid, runs away because he doesnt want to deal with the real world and responsibility and finds his true "Free Spirit" ??

No thanks...

Brock
04-01-2008, 09:32 PM
I wouldn't have pegged you to be sympathetic on this one.

I did something similar after college. No, I didn't give all my money away and live like a tramp. But I did hike down from Washington through Oregon into Northern California.

http://www.pcta.org/about_trail/overview.asp

There were a few times I thought I was going to die on that one.

Rausch
04-01-2008, 09:39 PM
I did something similar after college. No, I didn't give all my money away and live like a tramp. But I did hike down from Washington through Oregon into Northern California.

http://www.pcta.org/about_trail/overview.asp

There were a few times I thought I was going to die on that one.

I'll admit to the fascination of leaving your old life and starting a new one. I'll even buy getting back to nature, living off the land, trying to get closer to God, etc.

Heck, one of my best friends helped his older brother plan for some 18 month hike through the Appalachians (apparently some famous trail/hike.) But he planned it out, saved his food and supplies, and knew what he was doing well before hand.

I use to sit on a bridge above some RR tracks where the trains would stop to dump/load and think about jumping on top the coal cars and hitching a ride to wherever they were going. Just to have and be something new. I even knew a hobo I called Joe (he just looked like a Joe) who did this and passed through 5 or 6 times over about 2 years.

In the end I still knew I wasn't really prepared or ready for it. I guess I just don't understand this being a dream some guy has and not even taking the time to prepare for it. It's either done on a whim (stupid) or well thought out and poorly executed...

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 09:40 PM
So buy a cabin in the woods, read some Thoreau, and BRING A MAP...:)

:)...my financial status requires me to BUILD my cabin by hand, but i've got the books & maps covered.

evolve27
04-01-2008, 09:42 PM
I did something similar after college. No, I didn't give all my money away and live like a tramp. But I did hike down from Washington through Oregon into Northern California.

http://www.pcta.org/about_trail/overview.asp

There were a few times I thought I was going to die on that one.

PCT boasts the greatest elevation changes among trails. Awesome. I wanna add this to the list of "to do" before I die. Interesting note, "Thousands of other hikers and equestrians enjoy this national treasure each year, some traveling only a few miles in the course of a day hike." I traveled 13 miles hiking one day and ended up by some horse stables in the middle of nowhere on a POS trail after making a wrong turn. PCT must be killer.

Simply Red
04-01-2008, 10:34 PM
IMO, the movie went nowhere. No good scenic shots. A bad Doors feel movie. Only not nearly as good.

don't waste your money.

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 10:48 PM
IMO, the movie went nowhere. No good scenic shots. A bad Doors feel movie. Only not nearly as good.

don't waste your money.

No good scenic shots!?!...they often STEAL the scene.

Your entitled to your opinion SR, but i couldnt disagree more with your take.

noa
04-01-2008, 10:56 PM
Apparently, right before he died he realized that happiness was sharing joyous moments with the ones you love. Too bad, once he learned this lesson, it was too late for him.

Yeah, I thought that this was crucial to his story. Its really what made the movie palatable to me. A lot of it came across as too much worship, but then in the end, when you see him in his pathetic state, and when he writes those words about happiness, you realize that he knows he was wrong. He is sort of torn down by the end, and I thought that was the most important thing to take away from the movie. I don't really care that he didn't bring a map. His journey wasn't about having a map so you could plan your escape route if need be, so I understand that. I certainly wouldn't call it suicide, like that wikipedia post. In the end, I have to admire his guts but ultimately, that means nothing in the end if you die alone and regret that you couldn't share your joy with others.

On another note, I have to hand it to Sean Penn for creating a visually stunning movie. The cinematography was outstanding.

Simply Red
04-01-2008, 11:00 PM
No good scenic shots!?!...they often STEAL the scene.

Your entitled to your opinion SR, but i couldnt disagree more with your take.

Wait now. Where were they? It was late and I was tired but I consciously remember the movie and it was not near the scenery of the flick I bought off PBS about that old bastard who did something similar to the guy from Emory U.

Simply Red
04-01-2008, 11:01 PM
The movie was wick, wick, wack. Deal w/ it. Ohh, JMO. ;)

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 11:06 PM
Wait now. Where were they? It was late and I was tired but I consciously remember the movie and it was not near the scenery of the flick I bought off PBS about that old bastard who did something similar to the guy from Emory U.

The movie follows him throughout the southwest, S. Dakota, the west coast & into Alaska.

If you didnt like the movie thats one thing, but the scenery was incredible.

Simply Red
04-01-2008, 11:31 PM
The movie follows him throughout the southwest, S. Dakota, the west coast & into Alaska.

If you didnt like the movie thats one thing, but the scenery was incredible.

The scenery, Scott was borderline terrible, for comparible mov's/doc's. JMO

Easy 6
04-01-2008, 11:53 PM
The scenery, Scott was borderline terrible, for comparible mov's/doc's. JMO

I just cant figure out how you come to that conclusion, there are panoramic shots of the country in every region he visits...rafting down the Colorado river & Alaska just to name a few.

You seem determined to hate this movie for all of the wrong reasons.

Simply Red
04-02-2008, 12:00 AM
I just cant figure out how you come to that conclusion, there are panoramic shots of the country in every region he visits...rafting down the Colorado river & Alaska just to name a few.

You seem determined to hate this movie for all of the wrong reasons.

I guess because I saw the documentary about a guy who did something similar many yrs. before this guy, and the scenery was dynamic.

ClevelandBronco
04-02-2008, 01:06 AM
I'd never heard of the guy.

I thought that this article was interesting:

http://www.mensjournal.com/feature/M162/M162_TheCultofChrisMcCandless.html

CosmicPal
04-02-2008, 01:28 AM
You should read the book or see the movie...maybe it will, maybe it wont change your mind.



I've read the book, and I've even read the original Outside article Krakauer wrote before it blossomed into a book.

I was interested in McCandless's story for when I was at that age, I too wanted to backpack around North America, but I decided against it. I refuted not because it was inherently dangerous, but that in the end, would it really serve any purpose? Would it really make me a different person? Change me? Inspire me? Enrich my life?

Most likely, and realistically- Not!

People inspire people. People enrich each other's lives. People give us purpose and allow us to change.

Environments and solitude don't do that. Environments and solitude only provide archaic fulfillment.

If you want to experience the wilderness and hope to find something about yourself- save up the money, grab a friend, and do just that- but be prepared for the worst. Preparation doesn't rob you of the experience. The nature itself is your ultimate high.

Krakauer emphasized this in his book, but once the book gained popularity, people- mostly those with hippie tendencies like myself put this kid on a pedestal not because he was brave, but because he did something so many others often thought of doing themselves, but didn't have the audacity to burn their money and discard the transportation to do so.

Krakauer is an inspirational writer and did a remarkable job of entertaining and educating readers. Unfortunately McCandless is a hero for all the wrong reasons.

Seriously, if you find McCandless so inspiring, then you need to read Kerouac's Dharma Bums and/or On the Road. Read Thoureau's Walden. Read a hundred other glorious books about removing yourself from the strains of society and becoming someone. The books I mentioned are classics for those reasons. Just like "Into the Wild"

Rausch
04-02-2008, 01:33 AM
:)...my financial status requires me to BUILD my cabin by hand, but i've got the books & maps covered.

We did fine for around 500,000 years without the American dollar. I'm thinking writing and maps are the deal breaker...

Rausch
04-02-2008, 01:35 AM
People inspire people. People enrich each other's lives. People give us purpose and allow us to change.

Environments and solitude don't do that. Environments and solitude only provide archaic fulfillment.

Those are either not your own and original thoughts or I'll have to kill you and claim they aren't...

Miles
04-02-2008, 02:18 AM
If anyone is interested, here is a link to the original article in Outside Magazine by Krakauer the was published before he wrote the book.

http://outside.away.com/outside/features/1993/1993_into_the_wild_1.html

KCChiefsMan
04-02-2008, 02:21 AM
if I didn't have any family or friends I would consider doing that.

ClevelandBronco
04-02-2008, 02:27 AM
if I didn't have any family or friends I would consider doing that.

If you didn't have family or friends no one would care unless a previously bestselling author found an opportunity to cash in on your futile death.

KCChiefsMan
04-02-2008, 02:30 AM
If you didn't have family or friends no one would care unless a previously bestselling author found an opportunity to cash in on your futility.

well I wouldn't care if nobody would care because I wouldn't have known anybody who would have cared.

ClevelandBronco
04-02-2008, 02:32 AM
Yeah, but this poor guy had friends and family. He should have gotten mental health attention.

Bill S Preston
04-02-2008, 03:31 AM
I watched some other documentary called "Grizzly Man" awhile back, seems to be much of the same. I could care if people go out and die in the wilderness, as long as nobody tries to make it into some sort of sob story. I might rent this movie for entertainment purposes, but these kinds of stories don't really carry a lot of meaning for me.

Bill S Preston
04-02-2008, 03:38 AM
I watched some other documentary called "Grizzly Man" awhile back, seems to be much of the same. I could care if people go out and die in the wilderness, as long as nobody tries to make it into some sort of sob story. I might rent this movie for entertainment purposes, but these kinds of stories don't really carry a lot of meaning for me.

Easy 6
04-02-2008, 08:43 AM
Yeah, but this poor guy had friends and family. He should have gotten mental health attention.

I dont see why he should be viewed through the lens of mental health issues, sane people do crazy things all of the time.

He didnt traipse off into the woods to die, he did die, but that wasnt his purpose. He was unprepared, not crazy.

Timothy Treadwell & Chris couldnt be more different IMO, the only thing they have in common are grisly deaths in Alaska. Treadwell DID have mental health issues as far as i'm concerned, having watched the 2 specials on him you can clearly see him sliding off the face of reality...his nearly incoherent rantings were sure signs of it.

tyton75
04-02-2008, 09:02 AM
I really liked the movie overall... I thought it was kinda dumb that he wants to go to Alaska so badly but doesn't know anything about living off the land...

However, if I had seen this movie in my late teens, early 20's... I could definitely see myself doing something similar... although i would have contacted my parents to let them know I'm ok.

and i woudln't have gone to freaking Alaska... maybe to the deep woods of Oregon or something though.. that would be cool.. maybe find a bigfoot.. lol

Duck Dog
04-02-2008, 09:45 AM
I admit, I had no idea who this guy was so I wiki'd his story. Sounds to me like he had a death wish or was disturbed in some way. To fall out of society without contacting family isn't normal. Living off the Alaskan landscape is nothing new but people prepare themselves for it. You don't give away your last dollar, you use it to buy the appropriate gear.

It sounds like a suicide to me.

It's on my Netflix queue.

Easy 6
04-02-2008, 10:29 AM
I admit, I had no idea who this guy was so I wiki'd his story. Sounds to me like he had a death wish or was disturbed in some way. To fall out of society without contacting family isn't normal. Living off the Alaskan landscape is nothing new but people prepare themselves for it. You don't give away your last dollar, you use it to buy the appropriate gear.

It sounds like a suicide to me.

It's on my Netflix queue.

Everybody has their own idea on Chris & i suppose none of us will ever really know. But the movie sure doesnt indicate any suicidal tendencies, he seemed to have a deep appreciation for life.

He took a self portrait beside the bus not too long before his death, he looks totally relaxed & happy.

In any case, i hope you enjoy the movie.

Frazod
04-02-2008, 10:33 AM
I watched some other documentary called "Grizzly Man" awhile back, seems to be much of the same. I could care if people go out and die in the wilderness, as long as nobody tries to make it into some sort of sob story. I might rent this movie for entertainment purposes, but these kinds of stories don't really carry a lot of meaning for me.

I've seen that one. Seems like this one would be Grizzly Man minus the bears. Just another moron who thumbed his nose at nature and got crushed.

Darwin 2 - Dumbass Hippies - 0

I think I'll take a pass.

Easy 6
04-02-2008, 10:40 AM
If anyone is interested, here is a link to the original article in Outside Magazine by Krakauer the was published before he wrote the book.

http://outside.away.com/outside/features/1993/1993_into_the_wild_1.html

Thanx for posting that Miles...it seems like a very fair assessment to me.

CosmicPal
04-02-2008, 10:56 AM
Everybody has their own idea on Chris & i suppose none of us will ever really know. But the movie sure doesnt indicate any suicidal tendencies, he seemed to have a deep appreciation for life.

He took a self portrait beside the bus not too long before his death, he looks totally relaxed & happy.



That is precisely the attitude that is so wrong with McCandless: He was your late teen rebel who decided to make something happen out of nothing. McCandless only had 2 things going for him, and they were this: Either die and be remembered as some lost hero in the wilderness; or live, and have all of his friends and future disciples look up to him as some wandering God.

The sad thing is, is that even Krakauer has mentioned several times in the book how McCandless didn't prepare for the worst and broke the most fundamental rules of living purely off the land; and that he was irrevocably ignorant.

Yet, a lot of late teens, early twenty males have turned McCandless into some golden hero, just like we produced James Dean, Fonzi, and Jim Morrison in the past.

Teen males will rebel, and continue to do so for as long as we are here, there's no question about that. But, later on in life, when you're working for a living, owning a home, and raising a family- you'll discover that the very things you rebelled against as a teen (schools, work, family, friends, etc.), are the very things that enrich your lives and make you a COMPLETE human being. Not running off with the Grateful Dead, or joining some misfit group of religious zealots, or running off to the wilderness totally unprepared.

McCandless deserves to be called a hero, 'cause in all actuality heroes are those who brave the elements and being stupid about it. Example: A fireman running into a burning building to save a cat. There isn't a person on this board that would run into a burning building just to save a cat, but your local fireman will. It's dumb, but when he comes out of the house with your cat in his arms, you don't think he's so dumb anymore- he's a hero. And that's how a lot of people view McCandless. Only that I still think he was dumb.

tyton75
04-02-2008, 11:01 AM
I don't think he was "dumb"... he was just a wreckless youth


but the idea behind the story, that pushes him.. thats the part that I can really understand.

I mean, the scene where he is talking to the sheriff about going down the Colorado river really exemplifies everything that is "wrong" with our country... how freedoms have evaporated.

again, really liked the movie.. thought he made some bad choices at the end.. but it is what it is

Easy 6
04-02-2008, 11:18 AM
That is precisely the attitude that is so wrong with McCandless: He was your late teen rebel who decided to make something happen out of nothing. McCandless only had 2 things going for him, and they were this: Either die and be remembered as some lost hero in the wilderness; or live, and have all of his friends and future disciples look up to him as some wandering God.

The sad thing is, is that even Krakauer has mentioned several times in the book how McCandless didn't prepare for the worst and broke the most fundamental rules of living purely off the land; and that he was irrevocably ignorant.

Yet, a lot of late teens, early twenty males have turned McCandless into some golden hero, just like we produced James Dean, Fonzi, and Jim Morrison in the past.

Teen males will rebel, and continue to do so for as long as we are here, there's no question about that. But, later on in life, when you're working for a living, owning a home, and raising a family- you'll discover that the very things you rebelled against as a teen (schools, work, family, friends, etc.), are the very things that enrich your lives and make you a COMPLETE human being. Not running off with the Grateful Dead, or joining some misfit group of religious zealots, or running off to the wilderness totally unprepared.

McCandless deserves to be called a hero, 'cause in all actuality heroes are those who brave the elements and being stupid about it. Example: A fireman running into a burning building to save a cat. There isn't a person on this board that would run into a burning building just to save a cat, but your local fireman will. It's dumb, but when he comes out of the house with your cat in his arms, you don't think he's so dumb anymore- he's a hero. And that's how a lot of people view McCandless. Only that I still think he was dumb.

I'm not holding him up as some kind of Modern Day Demi-God, one of my first sentences in the header says i have some mixed feelings.

But i definitely do admire so much about the guy & i think its obvious he had no intention of dying out there...the article Miles posted makes that clear, its a very, very good article...it portrays the good & bad of what Chris did, a "warts & all" look.

He was anything but a "idiot hippie" IMO, even with all of the right gear & plans i bet most here dont have the guts to attempt what he did.

Duck Dog
04-02-2008, 12:51 PM
Everybody has their own idea on Chris & i suppose none of us will ever really know. But the movie sure doesnt indicate any suicidal tendencies, he seemed to have a deep appreciation for life.

He took a self portrait beside the bus not too long before his death, he looks totally relaxed & happy.

In any case, i hope you enjoy the movie.

I don't want to sound like I'm dissing him. But two things bother me about the story.

1.Not communicating with his family.
2.Giving his savings away.

Thanks for the heads up about the movie. It sounds really good, I can't wait to see it now.

Easy 6
04-02-2008, 01:16 PM
I don't want to sound like I'm dissing him. But two things bother me about the story.

1.Not communicating with his family.
2.Giving his savings away.

Thanks for the heads up about the movie. It sounds really good, I can't wait to see it now.

He was certainly a different kind of guy, but the movie will help shed some light on his estrangement from his family.

The 2 things that i cant figure out are, if he had a pole & the guts from animals he shot...why didnt he fish for grayling???

And also, how do you take down a caribou with a 22 rifle???

tooge
04-02-2008, 01:24 PM
I dont see why he should be viewed through the lens of mental health issues, sane people do crazy things all of the time.

He didnt traipse off into the woods to die, he did die, but that wasnt his purpose. He was unprepared, not crazy.

Timothy Treadwell & Chris couldnt be more different IMO, the only thing they have in common are grisly deaths in Alaska. Treadwell DID have mental health issues as far as i'm concerned, having watched the 2 specials on him you can clearly see him sliding off the face of reality...his nearly incoherent rantings were sure signs of it.

Ya know, I have a deep connection to the wilderness too. I am most at peace with my life when I am hunting, camping, canoeing, fishing etc. Ive done some of the survival stuff. There are times I wish I were born 100 years earlier than I was, but you know what, I wasn't. Part of survival is adapting to whatever situation the environment throws at you. what I do now is go off for a week to canada or southern Mo, Ark, etc. find a remote camp without electricity, trailers, etc. and just chill for a week. Try to forage what you can legally forage, but be prepared to eat food you bring. It reconnects you to yourself like you cant believe and you wont die doing it. What he did was really rather stupid. A true naturalist and woodsman would have been prepared for the perils of Alaska. I admire his aspirations, but pity his foolishness.

Duck Dog
04-02-2008, 01:29 PM
He was certainly a different kind of guy, but the movie will help shed some light on his estrangement from his family.

The 2 things that i cant figure out are, if he had a pole & the guts from animals he shot...why didnt he fish for grayling???

And also, how do you take down a caribou with a 22 rifle???

I know when I was in Alaska I learned that the glacial rivers didn't have much if any life in them, perhaps that was his experience. I'm not sure of their life cycle, but he may have head shot a yearling caribou.

Easy 6
04-02-2008, 02:01 PM
I know when I was in Alaska I learned that the glacial rivers didn't have much if any life in them, perhaps that was his experience. I'm not sure of their life cycle, but he may have head shot a yearling caribou.

Yeah, thats true about glacial rivers having too much silt to support life. But the article Miles posted quoted a local who said that the stream nearest his bus had so many fish in it that you could practically shovel them out with a tree branch.

I guess we'll never know.

boogblaster
04-02-2008, 02:13 PM
Lived in the wild a few years myself .. I'll never forget it and wish I could do it again ....

Pennywise
04-02-2008, 02:20 PM
I wonder how many he rubbed out in the bus?

Duck Dog
04-02-2008, 03:54 PM
Yeah, thats true about glacial rivers having too much silt to support life. But the article Miles posted quoted a local who said that the stream nearest his bus had so many fish in it that you could practically shovel them out with a tree branch.

I guess we'll never know.

Wow, that blows that theory out of the...errr...water. I need to go back and read that.

Sully
04-02-2008, 04:12 PM
I wonder how many he rubbed out in the bus?

ROFL

Chiefmanwillcatch
04-02-2008, 04:24 PM
That is precisely the attitude that is so wrong with McCandless: He was your late teen rebel who decided to make something happen out of nothing. McCandless only had 2 things going for him, and they were this: Either die and be remembered as some lost hero in the wilderness; or live, and have all of his friends and future disciples look up to him as some wandering God.

The sad thing is, is that even Krakauer has mentioned several times in the book how McCandless didn't prepare for the worst and broke the most fundamental rules of living purely off the land; and that he was irrevocably ignorant.

Yet, a lot of late teens, early twenty males have turned McCandless into some golden hero, just like we produced James Dean, Fonzi, and Jim Morrison in the past.

Teen males will rebel, and continue to do so for as long as we are here, there's no question about that. But, later on in life, when you're working for a living, owning a home, and raising a family- you'll discover that the very things you rebelled against as a teen (schools, work, family, friends, etc.), are the very things that enrich your lives and make you a COMPLETE human being. Not running off with the Grateful Dead, or joining some misfit group of religious zealots, or running off to the wilderness totally unprepared.

McCandless deserves to be called a hero, 'cause in all actuality heroes are those who brave the elements and being stupid about it. Example: A fireman running into a burning building to save a cat. There isn't a person on this board that would run into a burning building just to save a cat, but your local fireman will. It's dumb, but when he comes out of the house with your cat in his arms, you don't think he's so dumb anymore- he's a hero. And that's how a lot of people view McCandless. Only that I still think he was dumb.

He was no hero. Why don't look up the definition of hero or why don't you come up with a new word for stupidity.

And quit making stupid analogies.

Chiefmanwillcatch
04-02-2008, 04:25 PM
Surprises me he wasn't eaten by a bear......oh yeah a big hungry bear ate the other brave stupid Alaskan hero.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0427312/

No one calls real Alaskans or eskimos as heroes....hmmmm.

stlchiefs
04-02-2008, 04:47 PM
He was no hero. Why don't look up the definition of hero

And quit making stupid analogies.

I completely agree. It's one thing to desire to get away as he did, it's another to foolishly call the kid a hero. Hero? ROFL Give me a f-ing break.

Duck Dog
04-02-2008, 04:49 PM
I completely agree. It's one thing to desire to get away as he did, it's another to foolishly call the kid a hero. Hero? ROFL Give me a f-ing break.


Yeah, gotta agree, a hero he was not.

evolve27
04-02-2008, 04:52 PM
Yeah, gotta agree, a hero he was not.

I'd think of him as an adventurer and/or martyr.

stlchiefs
04-02-2008, 04:57 PM
I'd think of him as an adventurer and/or martyr.

I can live with adventurer (though he was unprepared). But Martyr? What cause did he die for (besides Darwinism)?

evolve27
04-02-2008, 05:04 PM
I can live with adventurer (though he was unprepared). But Martyr? What cause did he die for (besides Darwinism)?

He suffered for the sake of his principle.

Halfcan
04-02-2008, 05:56 PM
Yep AWESOME movie-great acting and all around great story. Movie of the Year!

Pretty sad at the end-i felt like I really knew the guy.

suds79
04-02-2008, 06:00 PM
I thought it was okay.

I don't know. I just didn't get the guy or where he was coming from..... But the movie looked great on my 47 inch LCD TV. :thumb:

Halfcan
04-02-2008, 06:06 PM
I thought it was okay.

I don't know. I just didn't get the guy or where he was coming from..... But the movie looked great on my 47 inch LCD TV. :thumb:

He had a ****ed up childhood and was not going to let anyone tell him what to do.