PDA

View Full Version : Home and Auto Anybody got a garden?


Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 08:38 AM
What kind of vegetables are you growing?

vailpass
04-16-2008, 08:40 AM
I have a hydroponic garden. I grow roses and herbs.

Am trying to figure out how to lay down a small soil vegetable garden; it is not easy to do here in Phoenix where the ****ing sun burns everything to death.

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 08:43 AM
I have a hydroponic garden. I grow roses and herbs.

Am trying to figure out how to lay down a small soil vegetable garden; it is not easy to do here in Phoenix where the ****ing sun burns everything to death.

Do you use the Nutrient Film Technique?

boogblaster
04-16-2008, 08:46 AM
Yep Skip .. Just planted onions-lettuce-radish.. got pepper & tomato plants ready to plant later.. cuks & squash later also ....

oldandslow
04-16-2008, 08:48 AM
Yep...

We plant everything...corn, squash, watermelon, potatoes, green beens, onions, lettuce, egg plant, okra, - you name it - we have it.

The wife and I can all summer and fall.

Haven't bought a can of vegetables in 25 years.

vailpass
04-16-2008, 08:57 AM
Do you use the Nutrient Film Technique?

Yep. There is a great hydro store here in Tempe called Home Grown Hydroponics. I'm relatively new to the game, still working to get it just right but can already see some amazing results.

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 08:59 AM
Yep. There is a great hydro store here in Tempe called Home Grown Hydroponics. I'm relatively new to the game, still working to get it just right but can already see some amazing results.

Can you post a pic of your garden?

vailpass
04-16-2008, 09:03 AM
Can you post a pic of your garden?

I'm a little hesitant to put personal pics on the intertubes.

Mile High Mania
04-16-2008, 09:05 AM
I'm a little hesitant to put personal pics on the intertubes.

It would just be a pic of dirt, potential food, etc... no? I also don't post personal pics, but I'll post pics of dirt and greenery... I don't garden though. I have a yard and some weeds though... wanna see?

Bwana
04-16-2008, 09:05 AM
I'm a little hesitant to put personal pics on the intertubes.

Indeed: You never know when a nasty ill tempered rabbit may be lurking on the board and then you're screwed! :eek:

vailpass
04-16-2008, 09:07 AM
Indeed: You never know when a nasty ill tempered rabbit may be lurking on the board and then you're screwed! :eek:

:) Exactly right.

Demonpenz
04-16-2008, 09:08 AM
I got a big ole squash you can suck on!

Bwana
04-16-2008, 09:12 AM
I got a big ole squash you can suck on!


Well isn't that special.

Rain Man
04-16-2008, 09:13 AM
I have a rock garden. They grow really slow.

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 09:16 AM
Well isn't that special.

He's a special person. His name should be changed to Special Ed.

Hog Farmer
04-16-2008, 09:32 AM
I've been having trouble growing my hogs. I think I planted them too deep!

tooge
04-16-2008, 09:46 AM
yeah, and I just doubled its size this year. I will plant tomatoes, peppers, jalapenos, cucumbers, and some greens. We also have a pretty hefty stand of blackberries, raspberries, and strawberries.

Gonzo
04-16-2008, 09:51 AM
Can you post a pic of your garden?

I seriously doubt Skip would post pics of his "garden" as well.

:bong:

BigChiefFan
04-16-2008, 09:55 AM
I have a rock garden. They grow really slow.
That was great!:clap:Funny stuff.

Psyko Tek
04-16-2008, 10:30 AM
I have a hydroponic garden. I grow roses and herbs.

Am trying to figure out how to lay down a small soil vegetable garden; it is not easy to do here in Phoenix where the ****ing sun burns everything to death.

I got one going in my front yard (flower bed) right next to the house in Mesa
just use a lot of horse shit
I have tomatoes, red onions, Japeleno, bell peppers, and an artichoke

BigOlChiefsfan
04-16-2008, 10:41 AM
I grow a few fruit trees and berries, plus herbs, peppers and tomatoes, spinach, onion, shallots, radish as a 'catch crop' to fill in the empty dirt between other crops. I use the 'square foot' garden method for the veggies, and I need to finish another raised bed asap and put the tomatoes in 'new dirt' this year, I don't like to grow tomatoes/peppers in the same spot, they leave 'wilt' disease in the soil and it'll infect this years crop if I grow them were I had last years stuff.

No garden photos available, go to http://www.squarefootgardening.com/

or http://www.journeytoforever.org/garden_sqft.html

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 10:49 AM
I got one going in my front yard (flower bed) right next to the house in Mesa
just use a lot of horse shit
I have tomatoes, red onions, Japeleno, bell peppers, and an artichoke

I don't use horse shit because horses only have one stomach and weed seeds can make it through the digestive system. I use goat, sheep or cow manure. They have 4 stomachs.

vailpass
04-16-2008, 10:54 AM
I got one going in my front yard (flower bed) right next to the house in Mesa
just use a lot of horse shit
I have tomatoes, red onions, Japeleno, bell peppers, and an artichoke

Did you just till the dirt in your yard or did you add soil?

keg in kc
04-16-2008, 10:59 AM
I may have an herb garden this year, and a flower pot or two out on my coffin-sized porch.

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 11:04 AM
Did you just till the dirt in your yard or did you add soil?

Don't tell him Psycho, he might hunt you down and kill you.

BigOlChiefsfan
04-16-2008, 11:37 AM
Vailpass, in your part of the country I'd add "soil" to what's there. Except don't buy soil. For a 4x4 bed, buy about 5 or 6 bags of 'composted peat'. Add a bale of sphagnum peat moss and a couple of bucketsful of perlite. Mix this well (I pour it all on a tarp and have two people 'fold' the tarp back and forth a few times til it mixes) and then plant in it. You can build a container for it if you like, or just mound it up with a hoe or rake. I've done that before and grown sweet potatoes in the 'mound', it worked fine.
This mix of composted peat/spaghnum peatmoss/perlite is light, and will hold water pretty well. I always put some mulch on top after the plants come up.

While your dirt beneath it provides plenty of fertitlity in most places, it never hurts to add some blood meal, bone meal and greensand or wood ash. Don't have that stuff? Buy some Miracle grow, water with it.

Chiefmanwillcatch
04-16-2008, 11:42 AM
Grocery store tomatoes are terrible. They gas them to make them red , hard as rocks and no flavor.

Indoor tomato plants are nice idea for winter.

Dartgod
04-16-2008, 11:43 AM
Indeed: You never know when a nasty ill tempered rabbit may be lurking on the board and then you're screwed! :eek:
Death awaits you all with nasty, big, pointy teeth.

Alton deFlat
04-16-2008, 01:33 PM
I have a few things planted... like radishes, lettuce, spinach, onions. Still waiting to plant the about 70 tomato plants, plus sweet peppers, eggplant, zucchini.

Friendo
04-16-2008, 01:42 PM
I haven't grown tomatoes for two years--last time I tried, the f***ing deer wouldn't leave them alone. I swear to God, I think there's nothing they won't eat except that which grows wild.

cookster50
04-16-2008, 01:46 PM
Anyone have luck getting rid of squash bugs?

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 02:13 PM
I have a few things planted... like radishes, lettuce, spinach, onions. Still waiting to plant the about 70 tomato plants, plus sweet peppers, eggplant, zucchini.

What are you going to do with 70 tomato plants? Going into business?

Stewie
04-16-2008, 02:42 PM
I normally just do tomatoes and peppers. This year I may expand my garden to include carrots, lettuce and maybe potatoes. I usually go to the farmer's market to get good produce in the summertime.

BigVE
04-16-2008, 03:07 PM
Anyone have luck getting rid of squash bugs?

Seven dust is the only thing that has worked for us. Those bugs are vicious on an 'ol zucchini plant.

Delano
04-16-2008, 03:27 PM
I don't use horse shit because horses only have one stomach and weed seeds can make it through the digestive system. I use goat, sheep or cow manure. They have 4 stomachs.

Cows don't have four stomachs.

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 03:29 PM
Cows don't have four stomachs.

Bullshit!

Delano
04-16-2008, 03:32 PM
Bullshit!

:)

seclark
04-16-2008, 03:35 PM
"The photograph below, taken from A Dairy Handbook for Tropical America, depicts the internal organs of the cow, including the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, and mammary systems: 1, heart; 2, lungs; 3, gullet; 4, paunch (1st stomach); 5, reticulum (2nd stomach); 6, omasum (3rd stomach); 7, abomasum (4th stomach); 8, small intestines; 9, large intestines; 10, milk veins; 11, milk cistern."

Delano
04-16-2008, 03:40 PM
"The photograph below, taken from A Dairy Handbook for Tropical America, depicts the internal organs of the cow, including the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, and mammary systems: 1, heart; 2, lungs; 3, gullet; 4, paunch (1st stomach); 5, reticulum (2nd stomach); 6, omasum (3rd stomach); 7, abomasum (4th stomach); 8, small intestines; 9, large intestines; 10, milk veins; 11, milk cistern."

I think that the four stomach misconception was popular when that diagram was made, in the 50's. Animal scientists realize now, that the cow has four chambers in one stomach.

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 06:51 PM
I grow a few fruit trees and berries, plus herbs, peppers and tomatoes, spinach, onion, shallots, radish as a 'catch crop' to fill in the empty dirt between other crops. I use the 'square foot' garden method for the veggies, and I need to finish another raised bed asap and put the tomatoes in 'new dirt' this year, I don't like to grow tomatoes/peppers in the same spot, they leave 'wilt' disease in the soil and it'll infect this years crop if I grow them were I had last years stuff.

No garden photos available, go to http://www.squarefootgardening.com/

or http://www.journeytoforever.org/garden_sqft.html

Square foot gardening is a lot of fun. I built my frames out of 2 X 6's and plywood. You can even put legs on them if you want to garden standing up.

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 06:52 PM
I think that the four stomach misconception was popular when that diagram was made, in the 50's. Animal scientists realize now, that the cow has four chambers in one stomach.

Google 4 stomachs and see what you get.

KcMizzou
04-16-2008, 06:58 PM
Grocery store tomatoes are terrible. They gas them to make them red , hard as rocks and no flavor.
They have a grainy texture sometimes too.

I love home grown tomatoes. I'll just slice them up and eat 'em with salt and pepper.

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 07:01 PM
They have a grainy texture sometimes too.

I love home grown tomatoes. I'll just slice them up and eat 'em with salt and pepper.

You can tell a tasty tomato by slicing it and looking at it. All the taste in a tomato is in the jelly like substance around the seeds.

Bill Parcells
04-16-2008, 07:03 PM
You can tell a tasty tomato by slicing it and looking at it. All the taste in a tomato is in the jelly like substance around the seeds.

What in the **** kind of hillbilly tomatoes are you guys eating out there? :spock:

http://www.njtomato.com/

Bill Parcells
04-16-2008, 07:05 PM
http://www.njtomato.com/mz.jpg

:evil:

KcMizzou
04-16-2008, 07:07 PM
What in the **** kind of hillbilly tomatoes are you guys eating out there? :spock:

http://www.njtomato.com/Silly New Yorker. Go post about something you know about.... like... ummm... muggings, or something.

:D

Bill Parcells
04-16-2008, 07:11 PM
Silly New Yorker. Go post about something you know about.... like... ummm... muggings, or something.

:D

I actually live in the suburbia shit hole neighbor of NY, New Jersey. :Lin:

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 07:11 PM
Silly New Yorker. Go post about something you know about.... like... ummm... muggings, or something.

:D

I'll bet Dick Vitale would tell you the east coast has the best tomatoes.

KcMizzou
04-16-2008, 07:13 PM
I actually live in the suburbia shit hole neighbor of NY, New Jersey. :Lin:Meh, close enough.

Bill Parcells
04-16-2008, 07:20 PM
I'll bet Dick Vitale would tell you the east coast has the best tomatoes.

I'll give you a little tip, old timer. I use special steroids in the hole that has worked like magic beans for me.

If you want your annual flowers or veggie garden to do well, follow these steps.

In the hole use these products.

1) Start out with using a good Growers mix. NOT PEET MOSS! that shit sucks!

2)osmocote slow release fertilizer 10-10-10

3)Terra sorb for water retention

http://www.bes-tex.com/images/product_images/Terrasorb.jpg

Description: Terra-Sorb hydrogel is a long-lasting, easy to use, water absorbing crystal used as a soil amendment. In addition to helping conserve moisture, it can help prevent some nutrients from leaching out of your soil. Use it with hostas, astilbes, ferns, and other moisture loving perennials, or add it to your vegetable garden, raised beds, window boxes, and hanging baskets. By adding hydrogel, you will often increase the growth rate or decrease the watering frequency. In undisturbed conditions it lasts 8 - 10 years in the soil but lasts 3 - 4 years under normal gardening conditions.

Be careful with this shit. if you use too much of it you will either find a pool of jell-o or it will pop your plant out of the hole.

If all this doesn't work. I use my special compost mix. 50%top soil/40%compost/10%sand for drainage. I had 3-4ft begonias after putting 6 inches of this crap in the soil.

Good luck!

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 07:24 PM
I'll give you a little tip, old timer. I use special steroids in the hole that has worked like magic beans for me.

If you want your annual flowers or veggie garden to do well, follow these steps.

In the hole use these products.

1) Start out with using a good Growers mix. NOT PEET MOSS! that shit sucks!

2)osmocote slow release fertilizer 10-10-10

3)Terri sorb for water retention

http://www.bes-tex.com/images/product_images/Terrasorb.jpg



Be careful with this shit. if you use too much of it you will either find a pool of jell-o or it will pop your plant out of the hole.

If all this doesn't work. I use my special compost mix. 50%top soil/40%compost/10%sand for drainage. I had 3-4ft begonias after putting 6 inches of this crap in the soil.

Goos luck!

That's waay too much trouble you young whippersnapper. By far the best way to raise tomatoes is hydroponically using the Nutrient Film Technique. As much as I hate it, this was developed at Rutgers.

Psyko Tek
04-16-2008, 07:32 PM
Did you just till the dirt in your yard or did you add soil?

added it
my wife worked for a landscaping company the laid the front yard sprinklers, and sodded it for the cost of the materials
I'm not sure what kid of shit it is, might be steer I didn't check that

Bwana
04-16-2008, 07:32 PM
Google 4 stomachs and see what you get.

:hmmm:

Skip Towne
04-16-2008, 07:44 PM
:hmmm:

No doubt

Delano
04-16-2008, 08:34 PM
Google 4 stomachs and see what you get.

Why limit the search term? Google cow stomach and see what you get.

I found this explanation and any extension agent, animal science professor, or biologist will tell you the same thing.

FORESTOMACH (RETICULORMEN)

This fermentation vat is composed of two areas called the reticulum and the rumen. The reticulum has a distinctive "honeycomb" appearance. It aids to help bring boluses of feed back up to the mouth for rechewing. It also serves as a receptacle for heavy foreign objects that she eats. A condition known as "Hardware Disease" may occur if a metal object such as wire or a nail is swallowed and punctures the reticulum wall. This condition may prove lethal for two reasons. First, the bacteria and protozoa can contaminate the body cavity resulting in peritonitis and second, the heart and diaphragm may be punctured by the object causing failure of these tissues. The rumen is, by far, the largest compartment. Its purpose is to store large quantities of feed, keep the feed mixing by strong contractions, and to provide a suitable environment for the bacteria and protozoa to live. This environment is kept agreeable to the microorganisms by maintaining a relatively constant temperature and pH and by removing many of their waste products. Most of the waste products are volatile fatty acids. These volatile fatty acids are the primary sources of energy for the cow. They are absorbed by thousands of "finger-like" projections lining the bottom and sides of the rumen wall. These can be 1/2 inch long and they increase the surface area of the rumen so as to increase her ability to absorb volatile fatty acids.

OMASUM

Once the feed has been reduced in size by chewing and digestion by the bacteria and protozoa, it can pass into a third compartment called the omasum. This area has been nicknamed the "many-plies" due to its unique structure. It has the appearance of an open book with three sides bound. The tissues within are likened to the pages of a book and are called leaves. Up to 100 leaves can be found in the omasum. These leaves have small papillae on them which absorb a large portion of the volatile fatty acids that were not absorbed through the rumen wall. Water and electrolytes such as potassium and sodium are likely absorbed here as well thus drying out the feedstuffs before they enter the next compartment.
ABOMASUM

This fourth and last compartment which make up the cow's stomach is the abomasum or "true" stomach as it is called because it functions in a very similar way to the stomach of a man or pig. As in the omasum, the abomasum contains many folds to increase its surface area. These leaves enable the abomasum to be in contact with the large amounts of feed passing through it daily. The walls of the abomasum secrete enzymes and hydrochloric acid. The pH of the digesta coming into the abomasum is around 6.0 but is quickly lowered to about 2.5 by the acid. This creates a proper environment for the enzymes to function. The chief digestive function of the abomasum is the partial breakdown of proteins. The enzyme pepsin is responsible for this. Proteins from the feed and the microorganisms coming from the rumen are broken down to smaller units called peptides before leaving.http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/DS061

And from Virginia Tech's extension service:

The four compartments of the cattle stomach are the rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum.http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/beef/400-010/400-010.html

So again, the cow has one stomach with four compartments, unlike the common misunderstanding of one cow, four stomachs.

BigVE
04-17-2008, 01:21 AM
Well I HAD a garden till about 45 minutes ago...thunderstorm came through and with 60+mph windgusts and at least dime sized hail. The ground is white. 50 bucks worth of plants are probably toast by this point. We had to replant 3 times last year because of hail/excessive wind and rain. Ah, the beauty of Kansas.

blueballs
04-17-2008, 02:48 AM
Looking for a scarecrow job for the summer

Otter
04-17-2008, 03:19 AM
I had my first sip of wine when my old man pulled a tomato off the vine, gave a quick look around for my Mom and let me wash a mouthful of tomato down with some piasano'.

There's nothing quiet like the nostalgia of preparing a meal from the back yard.

Saggysack
04-17-2008, 05:26 AM
I would like to see a pic of these rose buds.

cookster50
04-17-2008, 06:01 AM
Seven dust is the only thing that has worked for us. Those bugs are vicious on an 'ol zucchini plant.

None of that stuff has worked for me, they laugh at me when I try it.

BigOlChiefsfan
04-17-2008, 08:13 AM
I need to get an Irish Scarecrow (http://carcino.gen.nz/images/index.php/00b9a680/0f1adff7)

chasedude
04-17-2008, 09:04 AM
I need to get an Irish Scarecrow (http://carcino.gen.nz/images/index.php/00b9a680/0f1adff7)
ROFL

vailpass
04-17-2008, 10:10 AM
added it
my wife worked for a landscaping company the laid the front yard sprinklers, and sodded it for the cost of the materials
I'm not sure what kid of shit it is, might be steer I didn't check that

Thanks. We don't have sprinklers, I take irrigation once every two weeks. Wonder how sitting under 6 inches of water for a day would play out for a garden? Probably wash everything away. Maybe I need to try the Square Foot Gardening thing and raise it up a little?
Any Square Foot Gardeners out there who know if you can raise a garden off the ground to avoid flooding it?

BigOlChiefsfan
04-17-2008, 11:49 AM
I get a lot of runoff in my yard, hasn't bothered my raised bed yet - mine are low but I mulched them with wood bark and straw and once that mulch 'sits up' it's fairly tough. If you expect 6" of water washing across your garden I'd build a box of 2x8's or larger (I use 6' boards, buy 3 and cut one in half for 3x6 boxes, I have better luck with more, smallish raised beds. I fill it with 'grow mix' as I outlined above. Put some stakes into all 4 corners (I put 6' or 8' rebar in the north corners of mine, and then use twine to 'weave' a net between them for vine crops to climb - including tomatoes) I have no idea what kind of stress that your flood-irrigation will put on this, but it's worth trying a box. If it works, build more. If it doesn't, someone downstream may have better luck.

MOhillbilly
04-17-2008, 12:26 PM
im gonna plant some corn,maybe a tomato plant or four. i just dont have the dirt since grandpas place got sold.

vailpass
04-17-2008, 12:36 PM
I get a lot of runoff in my yard, hasn't bothered my raised bed yet - mine are low but I mulched them with wood bark and straw and once that mulch 'sits up' it's fairly tough. If you expect 6" of water washing across your garden I'd build a box of 2x8's or larger (I use 6' boards, buy 3 and cut one in half for 3x6 boxes, I have better luck with more, smallish raised beds. I fill it with 'grow mix' as I outlined above. Put some stakes into all 4 corners (I put 6' or 8' rebar in the north corners of mine, and then use twine to 'weave' a net between them for vine crops to climb - including tomatoes) I have no idea what kind of stress that your flood-irrigation will put on this, but it's worth trying a box. If it works, build more. If it doesn't, someone downstream may have better luck.

Thanks much for the great tips. Do you consider that site you posted earlier to be a good resource for how to construct a square garden? I'm the kind of "builder" ( I use the term loosely) that needs to see a diagram. I'd like to do this myself rather than hand it off to the yard care guys.

BigOlChiefsfan
04-17-2008, 02:17 PM
The book 'square foot gardening' is worth a look-see, but frankly I'd just check it out from the library. It ain't rocket science. A few tips, if you build 'boxes' I'd suggest using screws to put the 'box' together, I've found that 3' is wide enough - much wider and it's hard to tend the center. And I don't make mine very deep, but I have good dirt beneath. Make it as long as you like, but 6' or 8' is the cheapest. I make mine out of 'dog ear fence boards' because I hate running around a long bed. They're tough enough for my purposes. When they rot out I usually switch to landscape timbers or 'found' logs to line the existing bed. A good construction junkpile can be your friend (ask first) Leave space between beds at least as wide as your mower.
Other veggie books I like are the (hard to find but worth looking for) Better Vegetables the Chinese Way (uses raised beds that aren't 'boxed in' but rather just heaped up and raked into shape. Good book, out of print. Author is Peter Chan). With your irrigation, you might just ask some neighbors and see what they're doing. I know some folks in the SW who make 'sunken' beds instead of raised beds. They'll dig out the local dirt, put some 'soil mix' into the trench. Helps with watering. Some places y'all have to poke thru a caliche layer, if that's the case you may need to build a BIG heap just to avoid having to poke holes thru that mess.

That website 'journey to forever' is full of good, cheap ideas. Not a lot of 'visual aids' but enough.

Here's a club for square foot gardening:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/squarefootgardening/

A bunch of You Tube square foot clips
http://youtube.com/results?search_query=square+foot+gardening&search_type=

http://timssquarefootgarden.com/

Best advice...start small and keep at it. Don't kill yourself in april and may trying to lay out a huge garden. Better to have a small one you can keep with, and you'll know what you need next year. Get something started and hang tough until september (when I plant my autumn garden - ask your local yokels what they do. Gardeners are about as friendly as it gets, so long as you don't try telling them your tomato came in before theirs did.)

vailpass
04-17-2008, 02:22 PM
The book 'square foot gardening' is worth a look-see, but frankly I'd just check it out from the library. It ain't rocket science. A few tips, if you build 'boxes' I'd suggest using screws to put the 'box' together, I've found that 3' is wide enough - much wider and it's hard to tend the center. And I don't make mine very deep, but I have good dirt beneath. Make it as long as you like, but 6' or 8' is the cheapest. I make mine out of 'dog ear fence boards' because I hate running around a long bed. They're tough enough for my purposes. When they rot out I usually switch to landscape timbers or 'found' logs to line the existing bed. A good construction junkpile can be your friend (ask first) Leave space between beds at least as wide as your mower.
Other veggie books I like are the (hard to find but worth looking for) Better Vegetables the Chinese Way (uses raised beds that aren't 'boxed in' but rather just heaped up and raked into shape. Good book, out of print. Author is Peter Chan). With your irrigation, you might just ask some neighbors and see what they're doing. I know some folks in the SW who make 'sunken' beds instead of raised beds. They'll dig out the local dirt, put some 'soil mix' into the trench. Helps with watering. Some places y'all have to poke thru a caliche layer, if that's the case you may need to build a BIG heap just to avoid having to poke holes thru that mess.

That website 'journey to forever' is full of good, cheap ideas. Not a lot of 'visual aids' but enough.

Here's a club for square foot gardening:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/squarefootgardening/

A bunch of You Tube square foot clips
http://youtube.com/results?search_query=square+foot+gardening&search_type=

http://timssquarefootgarden.com/

Best advice...start small and keep at it. Don't kill yourself in april and may trying to lay out a huge garden. Better to have a small one you can keep with, and you'll know what you need next year. Get something started and hang tough until september (when I plant my autumn garden - ask your local yokels what they do. Gardeners are about as friendly as it gets, so long as you don't try telling them your tomato came in before theirs did.)

Thanks very much! I told my wife about this type of garden and she is excited to try it out. We've been wanting to grow veggies but haven't seen a method that looked like it fits our situations like this one appears it might.
Thanks again. :toast:

BigOlChiefsfan
04-17-2008, 03:14 PM
Good! When you're eating 'carmello' or 'brandywine' tomatoes w/fresh basil, olive oil and mozzarella in mid august, pour an extra glass of vino for me. Then drink it before the fruit flies ruin it.

Fairplay
04-17-2008, 05:41 PM
Still needs time. Weed and feed is what i use.

MOhillbilly
04-18-2008, 07:22 AM
Still needs time. Weed and feed is what i use.
hahahahaaa;)

Skip Towne
04-18-2008, 07:26 AM
Still needs time. Weed and feed is what i use.

Nice

Bwana
07-09-2009, 05:26 PM
How's everyones crop looking?

Zebedee DuBois
07-09-2009, 05:44 PM
Hail storm ruined our garden last night. All we have are various stalks, all the leaves on the ground. All the cukes are pummeled to oblivion.
:cuss:

DJ's left nut
07-09-2009, 05:49 PM
Based on my extremely unscientific research, 2 out of 3 Labrador retrievers love zucchini leaves.

Zucchini plants, on the other hand, do not love Labrador retrievers. RIP zucchini patch.

(and if you turn on my tomatos, jalapenos or cucumbers, RIP labradors...)

stlchiefs
07-09-2009, 06:32 PM
been picking a tomato every couple of days off my 1 tomato plant. mmmm

BucEyedPea
07-09-2009, 06:38 PM
Roma and cherry tomatoes right now and my herb garden. But the humidity heat and excess rain has ruined a lot of them. Got blight.
Had lettuces and arugula in the winter, regular tomatoes and roma in the winter.

I want sunflowers next and to learn to grow root vegetables for winter. Will do the lettuces and argula plus spinach this winter as well.

DJ's left nut
07-09-2009, 06:42 PM
Roma and cherry tomatoes right now and my herb garden. But the humidity heat and excess rain has ruined a lot of them. Got blight.
Had lettuces and arugula in the winter, regular tomatoes and roma in the winter.

I want sunflowers next and to learn to grow root vegetables for winter. Will do the lettuces and argula plus spinach this winter as well.

Don't sunflowers require a pretty disproportionate amount of space considering the yield?

That's why I've never done sweet corn and will likely steer clear of sunflowers as well.

DJ's left nut
07-09-2009, 06:43 PM
Neighbor just gave me a hugh zucchini and I have know idea how to cook it?

Peel it, slice it, throw it in a skillet with butter and/or oil with crushed garlic. Put some black pepper on it, a little bit of sea salt, cook until a little bit soft but still with feedback.

Or just run the thing over a cheese slicer and make zucchini bread.

Skip Towne
07-09-2009, 06:46 PM
My farmer buddy is bringing me tomatoes this summer. He hasn't showed up yet though.

stlchiefs
07-09-2009, 06:51 PM
Neighbor just gave me a hugh zucchini and I have know idea how to cook it?

Slice it like a cucumber and cook it in a pan with olive oil. A little bit of salt and pepper and it'll be good to go. No need to peel, it's not a banana :D

DJ's left nut
07-09-2009, 06:55 PM
Slice it like a cucumber and cook it in a pan with olive oil. A little bit of salt and pepper and it'll be good to go. No need to peel, it's not a banana :D

Don't have to, but if it's that big I'll be the skin's going to be pretty bitter. I'd take a potato peeler to it just to be safe, but to each their own.

BucEyedPea
07-09-2009, 07:00 PM
Don't have to, but if it's that big I'll be the skin's going to be pretty bitter. I'd take a potato peeler to it just to be safe, but to each their own.

That's where the nutrients are. Eat and don't be a wimp. :D

Bwana
07-09-2009, 07:05 PM
Neighbor just gave me a hugh zucchini and I have know idea how to cook it?

Roll with this:

Stuffed Zucchini Parmesan Recipe


Ingredients

1-1/2 pounds small zucchini
1-1/2 cups fresh bread crumbs
3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese, reserve 1/4 cup for topping
1/4 cup minced white onion
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
1 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 eggs beaten
2 tablespoons margarine
Directions
Scrub zucchini well then cut off ends but do not pare.
Cook covered whole with 1 teaspoon salt in boiling water for 7 minutes.
Preheat oven to 350.
Cut zucchini in half lengthwise.
Carefully remove zucchini from shells with spoon.
Chop into small pieces then combine with remaining ingredients except butter and 1/4 cup cheese.
Pile mixture lightly into zucchini shells and dot with margarine.
Sprinkle 1/4 cup cheese over top.
Bake uncovered for 30 minutes.

<!-- end directions slide -->

Bwana
07-09-2009, 07:10 PM
All right, season salt, garlic and butter and the grill is heating up. High or low temp and how long?

Parmesan cheese is a key. You will thank me.

Skip Towne
07-09-2009, 07:11 PM
There used to be a TV show called "Square Foot Gardening". I haven't seen it for several years now.

Bwana
07-09-2009, 07:15 PM
On top after cooking?

I do mine in a pan a lot of the time and use the shredded style Parmesan cheese for a finish. I let it melt in for the last few minutes on top. You could do the same on the grill.

Bwana
07-09-2009, 07:20 PM
All I have is dried parmesan, I guess I'll put it on at the end.

That works as well, but put in on about two minutes before you are going to pull it off the grilll so it heats up a bit.

Enjoy

Bwana
07-09-2009, 07:36 PM
Just put it on... Thanks and have some Rep for the reply.

Let me know what you think and next time you're at the store, pick up a bag of the shredded variety and use that. The fine ground stuff is good, but the thicker shredded parmesan seems to have a lot more flavor.

Bwana
07-09-2009, 07:58 PM
It was Okay, a bit mushy but as a side dish it might be alright. Not say'n I'm a big fan but for a 1st time a might give it another try.

Next time try it in a hot pan with a little olive oil, garilc and onions. Don't let it cook to long or you will indeed get the "mush."

Skip Towne
07-09-2009, 08:06 PM
How long is the gardening season in Montana? It's got to be really short.

Bwana
07-09-2009, 08:13 PM
How long is the gardening season in Montana? It's got to be really short.

It depends on what you're growing. I have fruit trees out there, that "in theory," I shouldn't be able to grow. I planted some tomatoes out in the garden on April 12 and they got smoked by frost. I replanted and these things are four feet tall, kicking out tomatoes like they're going out of style. They should be good to go until the end of Sept, or mid Oct.

DJ's left nut
07-09-2009, 08:38 PM
It was Okay, a bit mushy but as a side dish it might be alright. Not say'n I'm a big fan but for a 1st time a might give it another try.

If you put it in foil in a grill, it's going to do that. You're essentially creating a steamer.

I've never tried it but if you want to do zucchini on a grill, a fish basket (those metal cages you put fish in so they don't fall apart when you turn them) would probably work really well for harder vegetables. You'll get that grill char but you'll still have an open container so it won't lock in the moisture that creates that mush.

Groves
07-09-2009, 11:09 PM
There used to be a TV show called "Square Foot Gardening". I haven't seen it for several years now.

We built a small one this year.

http://gallery.me.com/mcgroves/100198

The kids got to pick what went in the squares. We have pumpkins, cantaloupe, basil, cilantro, dill, popping corn (strawberry), and some failed squares of sweet corn, watermelons, and jalepenos.

We also had 3 patches of garlic that are harvested and drying.

http://gallery.me.com/mcgroves/100287

Valiant
07-10-2009, 12:14 AM
3 different types of tomatoes, watermelon, cantaloupe and squash..

cookster50
07-10-2009, 06:51 AM
Battling squash bugs again this year, daily trek to the garden to look at every square inch of my zucchini plants looking for eggs.

Bob Dole
07-10-2009, 07:27 AM
No veggies. Only herbs.

ChiTown
07-10-2009, 07:28 AM
We're growing herbs, and THE best gdamn grape tomatoes you've ever tasted. DE-LISH!:)

Saggysack
07-10-2009, 07:38 AM
We built a small one this year.

http://gallery.me.com/mcgroves/100198

The kids got to pick what went in the squares. We have pumpkins, cantaloupe, basil, cilantro, dill, popping corn (strawberry), and some failed squares of sweet corn, watermelons, and jalepenos.

We also had 3 patches of garlic that are harvested and drying.

http://gallery.me.com/mcgroves/100287


What happened to the corn? Were they planted in the raised beds? If so, I wouldn't expect much either way.

Draw some rows and stack them atleast 4x4. 4 rows are need to pollinate corn to have proper production.

Iowanian
07-10-2009, 08:16 AM
Deer rolled in 2 nights ago and ate the damn leaves off of all of my sunflowers.....and the rabbits killed my giant pumpkin plant.

It's about time for some Carnivour Jihad.

cookster50
07-10-2009, 08:29 AM
No veggies. Only herbs.

Special herbs.....

Manila-Chief
07-10-2009, 09:23 AM
My farmer buddy is bringing me tomatoes this summer. He hasn't showed up yet though.

Hey, what happened to your mators? I thought you grew them, thus this thread?

BTW ... great thread!!!

We built a small one this year.

http://gallery.me.com/mcgroves/100198

The kids got to pick what went in the squares. We have pumpkins, cantaloupe, basil, cilantro, dill, popping corn (strawberry), and some failed squares of sweet corn, watermelons, and jalepenos.

We also had 3 patches of garlic that are harvested and drying.

http://gallery.me.com/mcgroves/100287

Love your idea!!! Great way to teach kids the "facts of life." But, I was looking for pictures of your "crops" growing?

3 different types of tomatoes, watermelon, cantaloupe and squash..

Are you already harvesting all of these? In the South, bragging rights are for the one who has a ripe watermelon by the 4th. Because of a very wet spring, mine are much later. Got watermelon/cantaloupes that are larger than a softball but no where near being ripe. We've been harvesting yellow crookneck squash for over a couple of weeks.


Battling squash bugs again this year, daily trek to the garden to look at every square inch of my zucchini plants looking for eggs.

Last year we had some beautiful "jack-o-lateens" growing until the squash bugs took over and the vines just turned yellow and died.

From my reading, if you don't catch them early ... your done. This year, early in the season, we (mostly my wife) killed a few of the adult bugs, and crushed the eggs. I sprayed heavily with Seven's spray. Was most interested in keeping them off of our melons/squash. We've had a couple pumpkin vines slowly die (that could have been from lack of watering???) ... but, so far I think we are winning the battle. But, as you well know, it only takes a few days of those critters and your vines are history. I'm still holding my breath and sprayed again w/Sevens.

We're growing herbs, and THE best gdamn grape tomatoes you've ever tasted. DE-LISH!:)

Congrats! They do taste extra special ... not sure it's the real taste or the pride of eating what you grew!

Skip ... how did your cherry tom. do?

Deer rolled in 2 nights ago and ate the damn leaves off of all of my sunflowers.....and the rabbits killed my giant pumpkin plant.

It's about time for some Carnivour Jihad.

Man, I feel your pain! Very frustrating. They advertise lots of products for keeping them away, but not sure any of it works. Have you tried "marking your territory" around your garden ... read somewhere that Indians did/do this. Also, not sure it works, but heard you can get human hair ... from the barber/beauty shop, put it in panty hose and hang it around your garden. Rabbits? Dogs/gun??? You know, I'm surprised we don't have problems with them. There are plenty of woods around our place, but so far no rabbits. Do see deer, coon, fox, etc. tracts Coons destroyed our late sweet corn last year and the deers were into the late snap beans.

To answer Skips question ... As I said above, we had a very wet spring so all our stuff is late. Been harvesting tomatoes for about 3 weeks. We had a blight/fungus/disease get into them. Started from the bottom and worked it's way up. Leaves looked like they were burned. Finally, broke off the affected limbs and sprayed. Seem to have it under control. Had some very nice fruits, but the vines are about 8'-10' tall (I think, early on, I broke off too many of the suckers) and are slow in setting new fruit at the top of the plants ... maybe too much late fertlizer? We did do staggering planting and have some young plants growing young fruit.

Squash, cucumbers, rattlesnake beans and okra have been productive. We have peas (a couple of Southern field type), baby limas, butterbeans, butterpeas, KYwonder, pinto beans, etc. (as in some type of green Mexican bean & a Filipino bean), and a few sunflower (in honor of our living in KS) growing nicely and some are beginning to bloom.

We have another garden down at my mother-in-laws' place. The 6 rows (about 120" long) of sweet corn is just ready to tassel. But, since it stopped raining, the ground is dry and the weather is hot. She lives on the very minimum S.S. and will not allow us to water (even if I pay the bill), so praying for rain .... soon!!!

Strawberries didn't make very well. Maybe the cool wet weather??? Also, the voles got into them. No, not moles ... voles. They eat the bulbs from underneath the plants and came up and ate strawberries. Very difficult to get rid of those things.

Very few blue berries, although the plants are only 3/4 years old. Apple trees and the 1 peach tree had only a half dozen fruits on them ... did not do well. Pear, cherry, Japanese persimmon, and plum are too young for fruit.

Been just a little frustrating gardening year. I expect some “fail” … but, not this difficult.

Groves
07-10-2009, 09:30 AM
What happened to the corn? Were they planted in the raised beds? If so, I wouldn't expect much either way.

Draw some rows and stack them atleast 4x4. 4 rows are need to pollinate corn to have proper production.

I've grown some corn during my years. Sweet corn isn't worth it to me, because I eat too much of it. We'll put up 20dozen ears next week. That should last me until next summer.

The kids were picking, so I let them put in sweet corn in a square. The seeds never germinated. They were given to us by a friend. I later tried to germinate a few more inside with wet paper towels and couldn't get any of them to sprout. Bad seeds.

All the raised beds do is allow me to focus my watering and make weeding a snap. It was also an excuse for some family woodworking, of course.

Chief Henry
07-10-2009, 10:03 AM
No veggies - but lots of flowers. I feed them Miracle grow 2x's per week.

stlchiefs
07-11-2009, 09:26 AM
How can you tell when a jalepeno is ripe for picking? When it starts to get the brown little striations on it? Help I only have one poor little guy hanging there and I need to get some success out of this plant!

Bwana
07-11-2009, 09:35 AM
How can you tell when a jalepeno is ripe for picking? When it starts to get the brown little striations on it? Help I only have one poor little guy hanging there and I need to get some success out of this plant!

A jalapeno is "ripe" when it turns red. However, most people use them green. They can be picked and used once they are the same size as the ones you see at the store. I have used them even smaller at the end of the season when frost is knocking on the door, mostly in chili.

stlchiefs
07-11-2009, 11:20 AM
A jalapeno is "ripe" when it turns red. However, most people use them green. They can be picked and used once they are the same size as the ones you see at the store. I have used them even smaller at the end of the season when frost is knocking on the door, mostly in chili.

Really? I've never had them get the same size as you find them in store and they've even started to turn red on me before. Even the biggest ones I've had in past years would still be comparable to the smallest ones in the store. I also don't use any fertilizer, miracle grow, etc. on them. I may just pick this little guy and see how he is and compare it to any future ones.

Bwana
07-11-2009, 11:26 AM
Really? I've never had them get the same size as you find them in store and they've even started to turn red on me before. Even the biggest ones I've had in past years would still be comparable to the smallest ones in the store. I also don't use any fertilizer, miracle grow, etc. on them. I may just pick this little guy and see how he is and compare it to any future ones.

I don't let many of mine reach the red stage either and eat most before they get really big. I think you're good to go either way.....enjoy.

stlchiefs
07-11-2009, 11:30 AM
I don't let many of mine reach the red stage either and eat most before they get really big. I think you're good to go either way.....enjoy.

If I'm not sweating while eating this the rest of them are staying on longer.

Bwana
07-11-2009, 11:37 AM
If I'm not sweating while eating this the rest of them are staying on longer.

ROFL

That's the way I like them as well. You talk about no pain, no gain.

If there isn't a fair shot that I will be bending the towel rack into the shape of a horseshoe while sitting on the head the next day, it wasn't hot enough.

Stewie
07-11-2009, 12:59 PM
Right now, in the crock, I'm cooking potatoes, onions, and carrots right out of my garden. Oh yeah, there's a chicken in there, too. I'm at least doubling my potato patch next year. Simple to grow and high yield. This is the first year I've grown them and so much better than store-bought.

Phobia
07-11-2009, 02:10 PM
If I'm not sweating while eating this the rest of them are staying on longer.

If you're seeking sweat you're growing the wrong pepper.

stlchiefs
07-11-2009, 03:01 PM
If you're seeking sweat you're growing the wrong pepper.

If you get enough seeds they do the job for me. Plus I love making guacamole.

Over-Head
07-11-2009, 05:43 PM
What kind of vegetables are you growing?
I believe my seeds were a mix of "Critical Mass/White Russian" :D

Skip Towne
07-11-2009, 05:45 PM
I believe my seeds were a mix of "Critical Mass/White Russian" :D

Sativa or Indica?

Over-Head
07-12-2009, 01:08 PM
Sativa or Indica?
Ya got me, I just threw em' in a clay pot and said grow ya bastages!
And they actualy did :D

Manila-Chief
07-12-2009, 03:53 PM
Ya got me, I just threw em' in a clay pot and said grow ya bastages!
And they actualy did :D

So, instead of a green thumb, you have a "green arm!" :D

Over-Head
07-18-2009, 08:55 PM
So, instead of a green thumb, you have a "green arm!" :D
More like "tribal black" cuz we havent aded the color yet :) (doing a full arm sleeve)