PDA

View Full Version : Life Health Nuts:cholesterol


Sure-Oz
04-24-2008, 05:25 PM
I am 28 and just got back some blood test. Saying i have a 240 in cholesterol. This is pretty high for my age isn't it? I haven't been exercising the past several months and have eaten alot of bad food (moms foreign spicy cooking) and fast meals. My blood sugar is fine and my liver etc is great, just the cholesterol is high. What are some suggestions on diet? I know i need to start running like i used and exercise more. I don't want to be like my dad who had a 5 bypass surgery and has diabetes. I am 6'2 190lbs...(im not "fat") Thanks

I currently suffer from achalasia and gerd so i am not the healthiest, but i manage.

bogey
04-24-2008, 05:28 PM
Did your Dr. prescribe any medication?

Sure-Oz
04-24-2008, 05:30 PM
Did your Dr. prescribe any medication?

I am going to see him asap, i just got a call over the phone from his nurse with a brief explanation. She didn't make it sound like it was too serious but told me to just watch my diet a bit. My gf is a huge health nut so i know she'll help me get healthier, my stomach has gotten a bit thicker in the past 6 months. So it is embarrasing even though im not a big guy. i just wanted some ideas from those who have exp. with cholesterol issues or have a great knowledge on health.

bogey
04-24-2008, 05:37 PM
I'm much older than you and have a family history of heart attacks. My Dr. recommended Lipitor and 80 milligrams of baby aspirin a day. Also, my wife feeds me lots of fish and salad :p and I stay away from the salt shaker. Good for you for discovering it at the young age of 28. Since you're aware of it, you'll likely live another 70 years.

BIG_DADDY
04-24-2008, 05:37 PM
Do your research on this one dog before you take any drugs. The case against cholesterol is well, hell I gotta go read this:

Cholesterol is NOT the Cause of Heart Disease





Ron Rosedale, MD

By Ron Rosedale, MD

Cholesterol is not the major culprit in heart disease or any disease. If it becomes oxidized it can irritate/inflame tissues in which it is lodged in, such as the endothelium (lining of the arteries). This would be one of numerous causes of chronic inflammation that can injure the lining of arteries. However, many good fats are easily oxidized such as omega-3 fatty acids, but it does not mean that you should avoid it at all costs.

Common sense would indicate that we should avoid the oxidation (rancidity) of cholesterol and fatty acids and not get rid of important life-giving molecules. Using the same conventional medical thinking that is being used for cholesterol would lead one to believe that doctors should reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease by taking out everybody's brain.

In fact, cholesterol is being transported to tissues as part of an inflammatory response that is there to repair damage.

The fixation on cholesterol as a major cause of heart disease defies the last 15 years of science and deflects from real causes such as the damage (via glycation) that sugars such as glucose and fructose inflict on tissues, including the lining of arteries, causing chronic inflammation and resultant plaque.

Insulin & Leptin Resistance

Hundreds of excellent scientific articles have linked insulin resistance and more recently leptin resistance to cardiovascular disease much more strongly than cholesterol, and they are in fact at least partially responsible for cholesterol abnormalities. For instance, insulin and leptin resistance result in "small dense" LDL particles and a greater number of particles.

This is much more important than the total cholesterol number. Because of particle size shift to small and dense, the total LDL cholesterol could still be low even though the number of particles and the density of the particles is greater. Small, dense LDL particles can squeeze between the cells lining the inside of the arteries, the "gap junction" of the endothelium, where they can get stuck and potentially oxidize, turn rancid, and cause inflammation of the lining of the arteries and plaque formation.

Importantly, many solid scientific studies have shown a mechanistic, causal effect of elevated insulin and leptin on heart and vascular disease, whereas almost all studies with cholesterol misleadingly only show an association. Association does not imply cause. For instance, something else may be causing lipid abnormalities such as elevated cholesterol and triglycerides, and also causing heart disease.

This "something else" is improper insulin and leptin signaling. Similarly, sugar does not cause diabetes; sugar is just listening to orders. Improper insulin and leptin signaling is the cause of diabetes. Likewise, cholesterol does not cause heart disease, but improper metabolic signals including improper signals to cholesterol (causing it to oxidize) and perhaps to the liver that manufactures the cholesterol, will cause heart and vascular disease and hypertension.

Removing cholesterol will do nothing to improve the underlying problems, the real roots of chronic disease, which will always have to do with improper communication, and the generals of metabolic communication are insulin and leptin. They are really what must be treated to reverse heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, obesity, and to some extent aging itself.

Cholesterol; Wrongly Accused?

Before we can begin to talk about the real cause and effective treatment for heart and blood vessel disease, we must first look at what is known, or I should say what we think we know. The first thing that comes to mind when one hears about heart disease is almost always cholesterol. Cholesterol and heart disease has been almost synonymous for the last half-century. Cholesterol has been portrayed as the Darth Vader to our arteries and our heart.

The latest recommendation given by a so-called panel of "experts" recommends that a person's cholesterol be as low as possible, in fact to a level so low they say it cannot be achieved by diet, exercise, or any known lifestyle modification. Therefore, they say cholesterol-lowering drugs; particularly the so-called "statins" need to be given to anyone at high risk of heart disease. Since heart disease is the number one killer in this country that would include most adults and even many children. The fact that this might add to the $26 billion in sales of statin drugs last year I'm sure played no role in their recommendations.

Or did it?

Expert Conflict of Interests

Major consumer groups think so. They found out that eight of the nine "experts" that made the recommendations were on the payroll of pharmaceutical companies that manufacture those drugs. Major scientific organizations have chastised medical journals for allowing the pharmaceutical industry to publish misleading results and half-truths. There is a major push under way to force the pharmaceutical industry (and others) to publish results of all of their studies, and not just the ones that appear positive. The studies that showed negative results would be forced to be published also.

It could be that lowering cholesterol might not be as healthy as we are being told. More and more studies are coming out showing just how unhealthy lowering cholesterol might be, particularly by the use of statin drugs. In particular, statin drugs have been shown to be harmful to muscles causing considerable damage. A common symptom of this damage is muscular aches and pains that many patients experience on cholesterol-lowering drugs, however most do not realize that these drugs are to blame.

Hmm...isn't the heart a muscle?

Statin Drugs Actually Increase Heart Disease

Indeed, low cholesterol levels have been shown to worsen patients with congestive heart failure, a life-threatening condition where the heart becomes too weak to effectively pump blood. Statin drugs have been shown to also cause nerve damage and to greatly impair memory. One reason that statin drugs have these various serious side effects is that they work by inhibiting a vital enzyme that manufactures cholesterol in the liver. However, the same enzyme is used to manufacture coenzyme Q10, which is a biochemical needed to transfer energy from food to our cells to be used for the work of staying alive and healthy.

Statin drugs are known to inhibit our very important production of coenzyme Q10. Importantly, while many cardiologists insist that lowering cholesterol is correlated with a reduction in the risk of heart attacks; few can say that there is a reduction in the risk of mortality (death). That has been much harder to show. In other words it has never been conclusively shown that lowering cholesterol saves lives. In fact, several large studies have shown that lowering cholesterol into the range currently recommended is correlated with an increased risk of dying, especially of cancer.

No Such Thing as Good and Bad Cholesterol

Because the correlation of total cholesterol with heart disease is so weak, many years ago a stronger correlation was sought. It was found that there is so-called "good cholesterol" called HDL, and that the so-called "bad cholesterol" was LDL. HDL stands for high-density lipoprotein, and LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein. Notice please that LDL and HDL are lipoproteins -- fats combined with proteins. There is only one cholesterol. There is no such thing as a good or a bad cholesterol. Cholesterol is just cholesterol. It combines with other fats and proteins to be carried through the bloodstream, since fat and our watery blood do not mix very well.

Fatty substances therefore must be shuttled to and from our tissues and cells using proteins. LDL and HDL are forms of proteins and are far from being just cholesterol. In fact we now know there are many types of these fat and protein particles. LDL particles come in many sizes and large LDL particles are not a problem. Only the so-called small dense LDL particles can potentially be a problem, because they can squeeze through the lining of the arteries and if they oxidize, otherwise known as turning rancid, they can cause damage and inflammation. Thus, you might say that there is "good LDL" and "bad LDL." Also, some HDL particles are better than others. Knowing just your total cholesterol tells you very little. Even knowing your LDL and HDL levels do not tell you very much.

A mistake that is rarely made in the hard-core sciences such as physics seems to be frequently made in medicine. This is confusing correlation with cause. There may be a weak correlation of elevated cholesterol with heart attacks, however this does not mean it is the cholesterol that caused the heart attack. Certainly gray hair is correlated with getting older; however one could hardly say that the gray hair caused one to get old. Using hair dye to reduce the gray hair would not really make you any younger. Neither it appears would just lowering your cholesterol.

Perhaps something else is causing both the gray hair and aging. Even if elevated cholesterol were significant and heart disease (which I question) perhaps something else is causing the elevated cholesterol and also causing the heart disease.

Let's look little more at cholesterol or, as Paul Harvey was fond of saying, "the rest of the story." First and foremost, cholesterol is a vital component of every cell membrane on Earth. In other words, there is no life on Earth they can live without cholesterol. They will automatically tell you that, in of itself, it cannot be evil. In fact it is one of our best friends. We would not be here without it. No wonder lowering cholesterol too much increases one's risk of dying. Cholesterol also is a precursor to all of the steroid hormones. You cannot make estrogen, testosterone, cortisone, and a host of other vital hormones without cholesterol.

Cholesterol Is The Hero, Not The Villain.

It was determined many years ago that the majority of cholesterol in your bloodstream comes from what your liver is manufacturing and distributing. The amount of cholesterol that one eats plays little role in determining your cholesterol levels. It is also known that HDL shuttles cholesterol away from tissues, and away from your arteries, back to your liver. That is why HDL is called the "good cholesterol;" because it is supposedly taking cholesterol away from your arteries. But let's think about that.

Why does your liver make sure that you have plenty of cholesterol?
Why is HDL taking cholesterol back to your liver?
Why not take it right to your kidneys, or your intestines to get rid of it?
It is taking it back to your liver so that your liver can recycle it; put it back into other particles to be taken to tissues and cells that need it. Your body is trying to make and conserve the cholesterol for the precise reason that it is so important, indeed vital, for health.

One function of cholesterol is to keep your cell membranes from falling apart. As such, you might consider cholesterol your cells "superglue." It is a necessary ingredient in any sort of cellular repair. The coronary disease associated with heart attacks is now known to be caused from damage to the lining of those arteries. That damage causes inflammation. The coronary disease that causes heart attacks is now considered to be caused mostly from chronic inflammation.

What Is Inflammation?

Think of what happens if you were to cut your hand. Within a fraction of a second, chemicals are released by the damaged tissue to initiate the process known as inflammation. Inflammation will allow that little cut to heal, and indeed to keep you from dying. The cut blood vessels constrict to keep you from bleeding too much. Blood becomes "thicker" so that it can clot. Cells and chemicals from the immune system are alerted to come to the area to keep intruders such as viruses and bacteria from invading the cut. Other cells are told to multiply to repair the damage so that you can heal. When the repair is completed, you have lived to be careless another day, though you may have a small scar to show for your troubles.

We now know that similar events take place within the lining of our arteries. When damage occurs to the lining of our arteries (or even elsewhere) chemicals are released to initiate the process of inflammation. Arteries constrict, blood becomes more prone to clot, white blood cells are called to the area to gobble up damaged debris, and cells adjacent to those damaged are told to multiply. Ultimately, scars form, however inside our arteries we call it plaque. And the constriction of our arteries and the "thickening" of our blood further predisposes us to high blood pressure and heart attacks.

So Where Might Cholesterol Fit Into All Of This?

When damage is occurring and inflammation is being initiated, chemicals are being released so that that damage can be repaired. One could speculate that to replace damaged, old and worn-out cells the liver needs to be notified to either recycle or manufacture cholesterol since no cell, human or otherwise, can be made without it. In this case, cholesterol is being manufactured and distributed in your bloodstream to help you repair damaged tissue and in fact to keep you alive.

If excessive damage is occurring such that it is necessary to distribute extra cholesterol through the bloodstream, it would not seem very wise to merely lower the cholesterol and forget about why it is there in the first place. It would seem much smarter to reduce the extra need for the cholesterol -- the excessive damage that is occurring, the reason for the chronic inflammation.

So Why Take Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs?

The pharmaceutical companies thought that you might think that. They went back to the drawing board. They did more "research" and found (coincidentally) that statin drugs had anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore we're currently being told to stay on our cholesterol-lowering drugs because now they work by reducing inflammation and perhaps not even by reducing cholesterol, and in fact perhaps in spite of it. Aspirin reduces inflammation for a lot less money. So does vitamin E, and fish oil, and dietary changes without the dangers of drugs and having many other benefits instead.

What About Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are just medical terminology for fat. A person with high triglycerides has a lot of fat in the bloodstream. Triglycerides are generally measured when a person has fasted overnight. High fasting triglycerides are either from manufacturing too much, or using (burning) too little. In other words, what high triglycerides are telling you is that you are making too much fat and you are unable to burn it. This indeed is a major problem. The inability to burn fat underlies virtually all of the chronic diseases of aging, and in fact may contribute to the rate of aging itself.

As such, one might think that the control of fat burning and storage might be very important in heart disease, and the other diseases of aging such as diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, and even cancer. Indeed, this appears to very much be the case. The two hormones that to a major extent control our ability to burn and store fat, insulin and leptin, appear to play a major role in all of the chronic diseases of aging. I would call them the most important hormones, indeed chemicals in the entire body. But that is a story for next time.

bogey
04-24-2008, 05:39 PM
Do your research on this one dog before you take any drugs. The case against cholesterol is well, hell I gotta go read this:

Cholesterol is NOT the Cause of Heart Disease





Ron Rosedale, MD

By Ron Rosedale, MD

Cholesterol is not the major culprit in heart disease or any disease. If it becomes oxidized it can irritate/inflame tissues in which it is lodged in, such as the endothelium (lining of the arteries). This would be one of numerous causes of chronic inflammation that can injure the lining of arteries. However, many good fats are easily oxidized such as omega-3 fatty acids, but it does not mean that you should avoid it at all costs.

Common sense would indicate that we should avoid the oxidation (rancidity) of cholesterol and fatty acids and not get rid of important life-giving molecules. Using the same conventional medical thinking that is being used for cholesterol would lead one to believe that doctors should reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease by taking out everybody's brain.

In fact, cholesterol is being transported to tissues as part of an inflammatory response that is there to repair damage.

The fixation on cholesterol as a major cause of heart disease defies the last 15 years of science and deflects from real causes such as the damage (via glycation) that sugars such as glucose and fructose inflict on tissues, including the lining of arteries, causing chronic inflammation and resultant plaque.

Insulin & Leptin Resistance

Hundreds of excellent scientific articles have linked insulin resistance and more recently leptin resistance to cardiovascular disease much more strongly than cholesterol, and they are in fact at least partially responsible for cholesterol abnormalities. For instance, insulin and leptin resistance result in "small dense" LDL particles and a greater number of particles.

This is much more important than the total cholesterol number. Because of particle size shift to small and dense, the total LDL cholesterol could still be low even though the number of particles and the density of the particles is greater. Small, dense LDL particles can squeeze between the cells lining the inside of the arteries, the "gap junction" of the endothelium, where they can get stuck and potentially oxidize, turn rancid, and cause inflammation of the lining of the arteries and plaque formation.

Importantly, many solid scientific studies have shown a mechanistic, causal effect of elevated insulin and leptin on heart and vascular disease, whereas almost all studies with cholesterol misleadingly only show an association. Association does not imply cause. For instance, something else may be causing lipid abnormalities such as elevated cholesterol and triglycerides, and also causing heart disease.

This "something else" is improper insulin and leptin signaling. Similarly, sugar does not cause diabetes; sugar is just listening to orders. Improper insulin and leptin signaling is the cause of diabetes. Likewise, cholesterol does not cause heart disease, but improper metabolic signals including improper signals to cholesterol (causing it to oxidize) and perhaps to the liver that manufactures the cholesterol, will cause heart and vascular disease and hypertension.

Removing cholesterol will do nothing to improve the underlying problems, the real roots of chronic disease, which will always have to do with improper communication, and the generals of metabolic communication are insulin and leptin. They are really what must be treated to reverse heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, obesity, and to some extent aging itself.

Cholesterol; Wrongly Accused?

Before we can begin to talk about the real cause and effective treatment for heart and blood vessel disease, we must first look at what is known, or I should say what we think we know. The first thing that comes to mind when one hears about heart disease is almost always cholesterol. Cholesterol and heart disease has been almost synonymous for the last half-century. Cholesterol has been portrayed as the Darth Vader to our arteries and our heart.

The latest recommendation given by a so-called panel of "experts" recommends that a person's cholesterol be as low as possible, in fact to a level so low they say it cannot be achieved by diet, exercise, or any known lifestyle modification. Therefore, they say cholesterol-lowering drugs; particularly the so-called "statins" need to be given to anyone at high risk of heart disease. Since heart disease is the number one killer in this country that would include most adults and even many children. The fact that this might add to the $26 billion in sales of statin drugs last year I'm sure played no role in their recommendations.

Or did it?

Expert Conflict of Interests

Major consumer groups think so. They found out that eight of the nine "experts" that made the recommendations were on the payroll of pharmaceutical companies that manufacture those drugs. Major scientific organizations have chastised medical journals for allowing the pharmaceutical industry to publish misleading results and half-truths. There is a major push under way to force the pharmaceutical industry (and others) to publish results of all of their studies, and not just the ones that appear positive. The studies that showed negative results would be forced to be published also.

It could be that lowering cholesterol might not be as healthy as we are being told. More and more studies are coming out showing just how unhealthy lowering cholesterol might be, particularly by the use of statin drugs. In particular, statin drugs have been shown to be harmful to muscles causing considerable damage. A common symptom of this damage is muscular aches and pains that many patients experience on cholesterol-lowering drugs, however most do not realize that these drugs are to blame.

Hmm...isn't the heart a muscle?

Statin Drugs Actually Increase Heart Disease

Indeed, low cholesterol levels have been shown to worsen patients with congestive heart failure, a life-threatening condition where the heart becomes too weak to effectively pump blood. Statin drugs have been shown to also cause nerve damage and to greatly impair memory. One reason that statin drugs have these various serious side effects is that they work by inhibiting a vital enzyme that manufactures cholesterol in the liver. However, the same enzyme is used to manufacture coenzyme Q10, which is a biochemical needed to transfer energy from food to our cells to be used for the work of staying alive and healthy.

Statin drugs are known to inhibit our very important production of coenzyme Q10. Importantly, while many cardiologists insist that lowering cholesterol is correlated with a reduction in the risk of heart attacks; few can say that there is a reduction in the risk of mortality (death). That has been much harder to show. In other words it has never been conclusively shown that lowering cholesterol saves lives. In fact, several large studies have shown that lowering cholesterol into the range currently recommended is correlated with an increased risk of dying, especially of cancer.

No Such Thing as Good and Bad Cholesterol

Because the correlation of total cholesterol with heart disease is so weak, many years ago a stronger correlation was sought. It was found that there is so-called "good cholesterol" called HDL, and that the so-called "bad cholesterol" was LDL. HDL stands for high-density lipoprotein, and LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein. Notice please that LDL and HDL are lipoproteins -- fats combined with proteins. There is only one cholesterol. There is no such thing as a good or a bad cholesterol. Cholesterol is just cholesterol. It combines with other fats and proteins to be carried through the bloodstream, since fat and our watery blood do not mix very well.

Fatty substances therefore must be shuttled to and from our tissues and cells using proteins. LDL and HDL are forms of proteins and are far from being just cholesterol. In fact we now know there are many types of these fat and protein particles. LDL particles come in many sizes and large LDL particles are not a problem. Only the so-called small dense LDL particles can potentially be a problem, because they can squeeze through the lining of the arteries and if they oxidize, otherwise known as turning rancid, they can cause damage and inflammation. Thus, you might say that there is "good LDL" and "bad LDL." Also, some HDL particles are better than others. Knowing just your total cholesterol tells you very little. Even knowing your LDL and HDL levels do not tell you very much.

A mistake that is rarely made in the hard-core sciences such as physics seems to be frequently made in medicine. This is confusing correlation with cause. There may be a weak correlation of elevated cholesterol with heart attacks, however this does not mean it is the cholesterol that caused the heart attack. Certainly gray hair is correlated with getting older; however one could hardly say that the gray hair caused one to get old. Using hair dye to reduce the gray hair would not really make you any younger. Neither it appears would just lowering your cholesterol.

Perhaps something else is causing both the gray hair and aging. Even if elevated cholesterol were significant and heart disease (which I question) perhaps something else is causing the elevated cholesterol and also causing the heart disease.

Let's look little more at cholesterol or, as Paul Harvey was fond of saying, "the rest of the story." First and foremost, cholesterol is a vital component of every cell membrane on Earth. In other words, there is no life on Earth they can live without cholesterol. They will automatically tell you that, in of itself, it cannot be evil. In fact it is one of our best friends. We would not be here without it. No wonder lowering cholesterol too much increases one's risk of dying. Cholesterol also is a precursor to all of the steroid hormones. You cannot make estrogen, testosterone, cortisone, and a host of other vital hormones without cholesterol.

Cholesterol Is The Hero, Not The Villain.

It was determined many years ago that the majority of cholesterol in your bloodstream comes from what your liver is manufacturing and distributing. The amount of cholesterol that one eats plays little role in determining your cholesterol levels. It is also known that HDL shuttles cholesterol away from tissues, and away from your arteries, back to your liver. That is why HDL is called the "good cholesterol;" because it is supposedly taking cholesterol away from your arteries. But let's think about that.

Why does your liver make sure that you have plenty of cholesterol?
Why is HDL taking cholesterol back to your liver?
Why not take it right to your kidneys, or your intestines to get rid of it?
It is taking it back to your liver so that your liver can recycle it; put it back into other particles to be taken to tissues and cells that need it. Your body is trying to make and conserve the cholesterol for the precise reason that it is so important, indeed vital, for health.

One function of cholesterol is to keep your cell membranes from falling apart. As such, you might consider cholesterol your cells "superglue." It is a necessary ingredient in any sort of cellular repair. The coronary disease associated with heart attacks is now known to be caused from damage to the lining of those arteries. That damage causes inflammation. The coronary disease that causes heart attacks is now considered to be caused mostly from chronic inflammation.

What Is Inflammation?

Think of what happens if you were to cut your hand. Within a fraction of a second, chemicals are released by the damaged tissue to initiate the process known as inflammation. Inflammation will allow that little cut to heal, and indeed to keep you from dying. The cut blood vessels constrict to keep you from bleeding too much. Blood becomes "thicker" so that it can clot. Cells and chemicals from the immune system are alerted to come to the area to keep intruders such as viruses and bacteria from invading the cut. Other cells are told to multiply to repair the damage so that you can heal. When the repair is completed, you have lived to be careless another day, though you may have a small scar to show for your troubles.

We now know that similar events take place within the lining of our arteries. When damage occurs to the lining of our arteries (or even elsewhere) chemicals are released to initiate the process of inflammation. Arteries constrict, blood becomes more prone to clot, white blood cells are called to the area to gobble up damaged debris, and cells adjacent to those damaged are told to multiply. Ultimately, scars form, however inside our arteries we call it plaque. And the constriction of our arteries and the "thickening" of our blood further predisposes us to high blood pressure and heart attacks.

So Where Might Cholesterol Fit Into All Of This?

When damage is occurring and inflammation is being initiated, chemicals are being released so that that damage can be repaired. One could speculate that to replace damaged, old and worn-out cells the liver needs to be notified to either recycle or manufacture cholesterol since no cell, human or otherwise, can be made without it. In this case, cholesterol is being manufactured and distributed in your bloodstream to help you repair damaged tissue and in fact to keep you alive.

If excessive damage is occurring such that it is necessary to distribute extra cholesterol through the bloodstream, it would not seem very wise to merely lower the cholesterol and forget about why it is there in the first place. It would seem much smarter to reduce the extra need for the cholesterol -- the excessive damage that is occurring, the reason for the chronic inflammation.

So Why Take Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs?

The pharmaceutical companies thought that you might think that. They went back to the drawing board. They did more "research" and found (coincidentally) that statin drugs had anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore we're currently being told to stay on our cholesterol-lowering drugs because now they work by reducing inflammation and perhaps not even by reducing cholesterol, and in fact perhaps in spite of it. Aspirin reduces inflammation for a lot less money. So does vitamin E, and fish oil, and dietary changes without the dangers of drugs and having many other benefits instead.

What About Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are just medical terminology for fat. A person with high triglycerides has a lot of fat in the bloodstream. Triglycerides are generally measured when a person has fasted overnight. High fasting triglycerides are either from manufacturing too much, or using (burning) too little. In other words, what high triglycerides are telling you is that you are making too much fat and you are unable to burn it. This indeed is a major problem. The inability to burn fat underlies virtually all of the chronic diseases of aging, and in fact may contribute to the rate of aging itself.

As such, one might think that the control of fat burning and storage might be very important in heart disease, and the other diseases of aging such as diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, and even cancer. Indeed, this appears to very much be the case. The two hormones that to a major extent control our ability to burn and store fat, insulin and leptin, appear to play a major role in all of the chronic diseases of aging. I would call them the most important hormones, indeed chemicals in the entire body. But that is a story for next time.

Or you can read this.

Sure-Oz
04-24-2008, 05:42 PM
I'm much older than you and have a family history of heart attacks. My Dr. recommended Lipitor and 80 milligrams of baby aspirin a day. Also, my wife feeds me lots of fish and salad :p and I stay away from the salt shaker. Good for you for discovering it at the young age of 28. Since you're aware of it, you'll likely live another 70 years.

My gf will do a kickass job for me like your wife has for you...

She always eats well and exercises well, its insane how healthy she can be and how she hardly ever gets sick. She said it is easier than I think it is to lower my cholestrol than it seems. I will definetly check wth the dr and see what i should do, i assume he will want me to change my diet first etc. I am pretty health consious and have been up until the past 6 months because i let my job and school come first before me. I always ate way too much too so i will cut down meals as well. Appreciate the kind words as well!

jiveturkey
04-24-2008, 05:43 PM
Fiber, fiber, fiber

Make sure you also get the good Cholesterol (olive oil and what not). Get your HDL levels up.

Skip the drugs.

When I was 22 my Cholesterol was about 220. It's now about 170, which is perfectly acceptable.

Sure-Oz
04-24-2008, 05:44 PM
Fiber, fiber, fiber

Make sure you also get the good Cholesterol (olive oil and what not). Get your HDL levels up.

Skip the drugs.

When I was 22 my Cholesterol was about 220. It's now about 170, which is perfectly acceptable.

Appreciate it...i take enough drugs with my disease as it is...i really would prefer to avoid anymore!

memyselfI
04-24-2008, 06:26 PM
Your cholesterol level has a genetic component as well. Does this run in your family? If so, you are predisposed to higher levels. It's sucks, I know.

Mine is 212. I exercise 3-5 times a week regularly. We don't eat alot of fried foods and the ones we do we use olive oil. We hardly eat fast food. We eat tons of veggies, fruits, and lean meats.

It's not fair.

irishjayhawk
04-24-2008, 06:30 PM
I am 28 and just got back some blood test. Saying i have a 240 in cholesterol. This is pretty high for my age isn't it? I haven't been exercising the past several months and have eaten alot of bad food (moms foreign spicy cooking) and fast meals. My blood sugar is fine and my liver etc is great, just the cholesterol is high. What are some suggestions on diet? I know i need to start running like i used and exercise more. I don't want to be like my dad who had a 5 bypass surgery and has diabetes. I am 6'2 190lbs...(im not "fat") Thanks

I currently suffer from achalasia and gerd so i am not the healthiest, but i manage.

I will still recommend the Eat To Live diet. It's a book on Amazon and it's pretty damn good.

Friendo
04-24-2008, 06:55 PM
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/othernuts/coq10/index.html

for real man...plus, what Big Daddy sez....

Sure-Oz
04-24-2008, 06:57 PM
Your cholesterol level has a genetic component as well. Does this run in your family? If so, you are predisposed to higher levels. It's sucks, I know.

Mine is 212. I exercise 3-5 times a week regularly. We don't each alot of fried foods and the ones we do we use olive oil. We hardly eat fast food. We eat tons of veggies, fruits, and lean meats.

It's not fair.

My dad has had a heartattack, moms dad died of a heart attack after a stroke, i believe dads dad died of a heart attack as well

Sure-Oz
04-24-2008, 06:58 PM
I will still recommend the Eat To Live diet. It's a book on Amazon and it's pretty damn good.

Got that book for the gf's months ago, she has read it cover to cover, she is probably the healthiest or one of the healthiest people i know. *knock on wood*

BigOlChiefsfan
04-24-2008, 07:03 PM
Eat some oatmeal every day, add some oatbran to it (throw in walnuts if you like, and I add blueberries/cranberries to mine). I use instant with a shotglass of oatbran added, but 'old fashioned' or 'irish' oats are prolly better. This works for me, helps get that LDL down. Don't forget the oat bran, it really makes a diff. You can't taste it mixed in with the oatmeal.

Eat 24 raw almonds every day or so (24 = 1 ounce) Count 'em out the first time to see how much of your hand they cover...then just grab about that many every morning while you're making coffee. Think of them as 'heart pills' so you don't go eating the whole bag in one sitting.

Split an avocado with someone every couple of days.

Clean out corn oil/soy oil/veggie oil from your cabinets. Replace with olive oil, canola oil.

If your HDL is low, exercise will raise that. 30 minutes daily, work up to 45 minutes daily. Anything you like, just move for now. Your HDL should be over 40 and higher is much better. You can justify a glass of wine (or two) per day to raise this, too. You can also take Slo-Niacin if need be to get it higher. I take that Slo-niacin before bedtime, niacin can give you a 'flushed skin' that makes you reddish. I don't care if I'm red while I sleep. Slo-Niacin 500 mg like I take is available OTC, but be sure you tell your doctor about the niacin, just so he knows you're taking it. Meds interact.


I think this guy is good. Heart Scan blog (http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/)

bogey
04-24-2008, 07:05 PM
Your cholesterol level has a genetic component as well. Does this run in your family? If so, you are predisposed to higher levels. It's sucks, I know.

Mine is 212. I exercise 3-5 times a week regularly. We don't each alot of fried foods and the ones we do we use olive oil. We hardly eat fast food. We eat tons of veggies, fruits, and lean meats.

It's not fair.

Yep. My 10 year old daughter has cholesterol levels that are high for her age. My Dad has high cholesterol, and I do too.

irishjayhawk
04-24-2008, 07:12 PM
Got that book for the gf's months ago, she has read it cover to cover, she is probably the healthiest or one of the healthiest people i know. *knock on wood*

I would follow it but being in college has its drawbacks and limitations. :P

ChiefaRoo
04-24-2008, 07:16 PM
Yep. My 10 year old daughter has cholesterol levels that are high for her age. My Dad has high cholesterol, and I do too.

Mine was 240 about 3 months ago and I'm in my 30's. Doc said it's too high. He put me on Welchol and an acid producing Niacin drug.

My grandpa and mom both have high chol. My G-Pa is 86 and has only about 30% circulation in his legs from arterial plaque caused by chol. according to his doc. He can only walk a little ways then his leg muscles cramp due to lack of blood flow.

So, you can look at it two ways. Be proactive after getting a good diagnosis (there is more to chol. than just good and bad) and then make your decisions. Or do what my g-pa did which was to live to at least 86, never exercises and he eats anything he wants to but he's in pain now because his arteries have chol. cement in them.

Sure-Oz
04-24-2008, 07:18 PM
Mine was 240 about 3 months ago and I'm in my 30's. Doc said it's too high. He put me on Welchol and an acid producing Niacin drug.

My grandpa and mom both have high chol. My G-Pa is 86 and has only about 30% circulation in his legs from arterial plaque caused by chol. according to his doc. He can only walk about little ways then his leg muscles cramp due to lack of blood flow.

So, you can look at it two ways. Be proactive after getting a good diagnosis (there is more to chol. than just good and bad) and then make your decisions. Or do what my g-pa did which was to live to at least 86, never exercises and he eats anything he wants to but he's in pain now because his arteries have chol. cement in them.

I'd hope to live 86 years considering the avg lifespan for a male now...

I will definetly do what i need to do to atleast improve my cholestrol health

Skip Towne
04-24-2008, 07:29 PM
I am going to see him asap, i just got a call over the phone from his nurse with a brief explanation. She didn't make it sound like it was too serious but told me to just watch my diet a bit. My gf is a huge health nut so i know she'll help me get healthier, my stomach has gotten a bit thicker in the past 6 months. So it is embarrasing even though im not a big guy. i just wanted some ideas from those who have exp. with cholesterol issues or have a great knowledge on health.

Sounds like you have the epizudic.

Ultra Peanut
04-24-2008, 07:29 PM
Get yourself some Honey Nut. Kid-tested, Omar-approved.

HemiEd
04-24-2008, 07:31 PM
.

ChiefsFan4Life
04-24-2008, 07:44 PM
I am 28 and just got back some blood test. Saying i have a 240 in cholesterol. This is pretty high for my age isn't it? I haven't been exercising the past several months and have eaten alot of bad food (moms foreign spicy cooking) and fast meals. My blood sugar is fine and my liver etc is great, just the cholesterol is high. What are some suggestions on diet? I know i need to start running like i used and exercise more. I don't want to be like my dad who had a 5 bypass surgery and has diabetes. I am 6'2 190lbs...(im not "fat") Thanks

I currently suffer from achalasia and gerd so i am not the healthiest, but i manage.

I'm not saying this will work for everyone, but for what it's worth it worked for me

I was told I had slightly elevated cholesterol so I bought a giant bottle of fish oil pills from Sam's and took two a day (one in the morning, one at night)

The next time I got my cholesterol it was reduced by a lot and well into normal range. Mind you, this is ALL I changed about my lifestyle at the time so it was definitely the pills. Plus, I don't eat a lot of fish so it's good to get that in my diet anyway.

However, one important thing to remember, when you buy the pills (if you do), make sure to buy the kind that say ENTERIC COATED - this means they are coated and digested differently than the regular fish oil pills so they will have no taste and won't ruin your breath or anything else. The regular ones that are not enteric coated will gross you out.

I would suggest it though.

Sure-Oz
04-24-2008, 07:50 PM
I'm not saying this will work for everyone, but for what it's worth it worked for me

I was told I had slightly elevated cholesterol so I bought a giant bottle of fish oil pills from Sam's and took two a day (one in the morning, one at night)

The next time I got my cholesterol it was reduced by a lot and well into normal range. Mind you, this is ALL I changed about my lifestyle at the time so it was definitely the pills. Plus, I don't eat a lot of fish so it's good to get that in my diet anyway.

However, one important thing to remember, when you buy the pills (if you do), make sure to buy the kind that say ENTERIC COATED - this means they are coated and digested differently than the regular fish oil pills so they will have no taste and won't ruin your breath or anything else. The regular ones that are not enteric coated will gross you out.

I would suggest it though.

Appreciate the suggestion...i'll look into that!

Chiefmanwillcatch
04-24-2008, 08:01 PM
google foods that reduce cholesterol.

http://www.laurelonhealthfood.com/2007/08/04/14-foods-that-lower-cholesterol/

BIG_DADDY
04-25-2008, 11:18 AM
Your cholesterol level has a genetic component as well. Does this run in your family? If so, you are predisposed to higher levels. It's sucks, I know.

Mine is 212. I exercise 3-5 times a week regularly. We don't eat alot of fried foods and the ones we do we use olive oil. We hardly eat fast food. We eat tons of veggies, fruits, and lean meats.

It's not fair.


Actually you would fry with coconut oil whenever possible as it doesn't it doesn' break down on a molecular level when exposed to heat. This is something I saved from awhile back.

"It is the only oil that is stable enough to resist heat-induced damage, while it also helps you promote heart health, maintain normal cholesterol levels and even supports weight loss coconut oil."

Here is a list of benefits.

http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/health-benefits-of-coconut-oil.html

Remember when doing research on health related issues if someone including the government is pimping the huge benefits of a product that can be produced for pennies it is usually disinformation.

Sure-Oz
04-25-2008, 12:39 PM
Actually you would fry with coconut oil whenever possible as it doesn't it doesn' break down on a molecular level when exposed to heat. This is something I saved from awhile back.

"It is the only oil that is stable enough to resist heat-induced damage, while it also helps you promote heart health, maintain normal cholesterol levels and even supports weight loss coconut oil."

Here is a list of benefits.

http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/health-benefits-of-coconut-oil.html

Remember when doing research on health related issues if someone including the government is pimping the huge benefits of a product that can be produced for pennies it is usually disinformation.


That pretty much sucks, im going to avoid the meds for now..my uncle is on a cholestorol pill right now from his dr.

BIG_DADDY
04-25-2008, 12:49 PM
That pretty much sucks, im going to avoid the meds for now..my uncle is on a cholestorol pill right now from his dr.

Not really, I love cooking with coconut oil. Best price is on iherb.com

The AMA would have you on a pill for everything if they had their way. Pops got a great doctor who has a private practice and only occasionally picks up new clients and is very spendy. He pulled him off all of his cholesterol lowering drugs including Lipitor. Pfizer sent him a letter immediately that would have made just about anyone think he was going to die if they didn't know better. The fact that they even knew he quit taking their product and would respond that way is scary.

DaneMcCloud
04-25-2008, 12:57 PM
My dad has had a heartattack, moms dad died of a heart attack after a stroke, i believe dads dad died of a heart attack as well

Personally, I'd suggest seeing your doctor and taking the prescribed medication. You have a history of heart disease in your family and without proper medication, you may follow their path.

Cholesterol is created by the liver. While unhealthy eating habits can contribute to high cholesterol levels, more than 90% of those with high cholesterol have a genetic issue, not an dietary issue.

Cholesterol is created by the liver. If your body at age 28 is creating too much cholesterol (240 - danger zone), just imagine how much your liver will be creating as you age.

I had my cholesterol measured at age forty during a life insurance physical. It was 195 (on the high side). I had been eating hard-boiled eggs after each workout and attributed it to the egss (one egg has more cholesterol than is recommended each day). A year later, I had a full physical and my cholesterol measured over 300! The doctor and the nurses were astounded, saying that with my body type and body fat (very athletic), they thought it would be around 190. So I re-tested on week later and after eating only organic berry smoothies and low-sodium and low-cholesterol soup, my cholesterol was STILL 300. My doctor explained to me that he's had 350 pound people in with a cholesterol level of 160 and a 160 pound person in with a level of 300. It's genetics, though diet can help.

I went on Simvastatin (Zocor 20mg) and after 5 months, it's back down to 206. I'll be re-tested in June but I can happily say that I've felt no side effects, whatsoever.

IF you're planning to avoid medication and try to deal with your cholesterol through dieting, keep in mind that you're going to have to be extremely disciplined and even in doing so, your levels may not drop a point. Additionally, if you're going to avoid medication, my advice would be to get checked every year. You dont want it to sky-rocket and go unchecked, as with your family history, it may lead to serious implications.

Silock
04-25-2008, 01:06 PM
Actually you would fry with coconut oil whenever possible as it doesn't it doesn' break down on a molecular level when exposed to heat. This is something I saved from awhile back.

"It is the only oil that is stable enough to resist heat-induced damage, while it also helps you promote heart health, maintain normal cholesterol levels and even supports weight loss coconut oil."

Here is a list of benefits.

http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/health-benefits-of-coconut-oil.html

Remember when doing research on health related issues if someone including the government is pimping the huge benefits of a product that can be produced for pennies it is usually disinformation.

Coconut isn't the only one. Peanut oil also has an extremely high smoke point, and it has a lot of unsaturated fat.

BIG_DADDY
04-25-2008, 01:11 PM
Personally, I'd suggest seeing your doctor and taking the prescribed medication. You have a history of heart disease in your family and without proper medication, you may follow their path.

Cholesterol is created by the liver. While unhealthy eating habits can contribute to high cholesterol levels, more than 90% of those with high cholesterol have a genetic issue, not an dietary issue.

Cholesterol is created by the liver. If your body at age 28 is creating too much cholesterol (240 - danger zone), just imagine how much your liver will be creating as you age.

I had my cholesterol measured at age forty during a life insurance physical. It was 195 (on the high side). I had been eating hard-boiled eggs after each workout and attributed it to the egss (one egg has more cholesterol than is recommended each day). A year later, I had a full physical and my cholesterol measured over 300! The doctor and the nurses were astounded, saying that with my body type and body fat (very athletic), they thought it would be around 190. So I re-tested on week later and after eating only organic berry smoothies and low-sodium and low-cholesterol soup, my cholesterol was STILL 300. My doctor explained to me that he's had 350 pound people in with a cholesterol level of 160 and a 160 pound person in with a level of 300. It's genetics, though diet can help.

I went on Simvastatin (Zocor 20mg) and after 5 months, it's back down to 206. I'll be re-tested in June but I can happily say that I've felt no side effects, whatsoever.

IF you're planning to avoid medication and try to deal with your cholesterol through dieting, keep in mind that you're going to have to be extremely disciplined and even in doing so, your levels may not drop a point. Additionally, if you're going to avoid medication, my advice would be to get checked every year. You dont want it to sky-rocket and go unchecked, as with your family history, it may lead to serious implications.


Read this before you buy into any of this guys hysteria.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/07/21/statin-drugs-part-four.aspx



Like I said, take your time, do your research and take responsibility for your own health. If you go with the meds you will fell good knowing you did your due diligence on the subject and made the best decision you could make. Do not just accept whatever horseshit the AMA is selling. JMO

BIG_DADDY
04-25-2008, 01:13 PM
Coconut isn't the only one. Peanut oil also has an extremely high smoke point, and it has a lot of unsaturated fat.

I was never talking about smoking points I was talking about molecular change. Did you read what I posted?

Stinger
04-25-2008, 01:33 PM
Just coming into the thread and have not read the responses yet .... If you are looking to take something.... Fish Oil pills. It a natural and I don't believe any sided effects.

Frosty
04-25-2008, 01:42 PM
Another chance to pimp this heart doctor's blog:

http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/

Does a great job cutting through the bullshit.

Sure-Oz
04-25-2008, 01:54 PM
im glad i have made this thread, all of your points are real helpful and i havent even seen the dr yet..

BIG_DADDY
04-25-2008, 01:55 PM
Another chance to pimp this heart doctor's blog:

http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/

Does a great job cutting through the bullshit.

Love the article on Cheerios. LMAO Just proves my point. If they are pimping health and it only costs pennies to produce more times than not it's total BS.

BIG_DADDY
04-25-2008, 02:02 PM
im glad i have made this thread, all of your points are real helpful and i havent even seen the dr yet..

Do all your due diligence on cholesterol and statins and either memorize it or bring it in and ask questions. Hit your doctor with it when you go in. You get some great responses. I find one of two things usually happens. The doctor either tries to come clean on some level and starts talking to you like a real doctor or they freak out and won't answer questions acting all indignant that you would ever question the advise they are giving you.

Sure-Oz
04-25-2008, 02:03 PM
Do all your due diligence on cholesterol and statins and either memorize it or bring it in and ask questions. Hit your doctor with it when you go in. You get some great responses. I find one of two things usually happens. The doctor either tries to come clean on some level and starts talking to you like a real doctor or they freak out and won't answer questions acting all indignant that you would ever question the advise they are giving you.

Good advice, my family dr is a friend and has been for a long time so i think he'll give it to me straight on what i need to do...if not ive got some knowledge and actually copying and pasting some of this stuff on a word document for myself. I didn't even think the thread would get past a few responses. The planet is great!

JohnnyV13
04-25-2008, 02:08 PM
There are a number of foods that do help you reduce cholesterol. Oatmeal, adding flax seed to your dishes, and drinking ONE alcoholic beverage on a daily basis are all things that help. (Things I do regularly). If you want to add flax seed to your diet, you need to remember that flax needs to be stored in a sealed container, otherwise exposure to oxygen will ruin its benefits.

I also eat a lot of japanese style stir fry rather than eating big slabs of meat. My cholesterol has gone from 227 to 151, with excellent ratios in all the tested categories.

Silock
04-25-2008, 03:12 PM
I was never talking about smoking points I was talking about molecular change. Did you read what I posted?

Do you even know what a smoke point is? It's the point where heat causes the molecules to break down.

Silock
04-25-2008, 03:21 PM
Do all your due diligence on cholesterol and statins and either memorize it or bring it in and ask questions. Hit your doctor with it when you go in. You get some great responses. I find one of two things usually happens. The doctor either tries to come clean on some level and starts talking to you like a real doctor or they freak out and won't answer questions acting all indignant that you would ever question the advise they are giving you.

No wonder you're so anti-doctor. You've apparently never had one treat you like a human being. Sad for you :(

BIG_DADDY
04-25-2008, 03:53 PM
Do you even know what a smoke point is? It's the point where heat causes the molecules to break down.


Smoking point isn't the only measurement of an oil breaking down. Iw ould get into this more but obviously you are more concerned about being a dick than coming up with answers.

Silock
04-25-2008, 04:05 PM
Smoking point isn't the only measurement of an oil breaking down. Iw ould get into this more but obviously you are more concerned about being a dick than coming up with answers.

Of course it's not, but you were specifically talking about oils that withstand high frying heat before breaking down and said coconut oil is the only one. That's just not true. That's all I'm saying. I'm not even arguing with you about the benefits coconut oil, because that stuff is all true.

"Actually you would fry with coconut oil whenever possible as it doesn't it doesn' break down on a molecular level when exposed to heat. This is something I saved from awhile back.

"It is the only oil that is stable enough to resist heat-induced damage, while it also helps you promote heart health, maintain normal cholesterol levels and even supports weight loss — coconut oil.""

If you were referring to something in addition to heat, perhaps you should have said so, because everything in there is talking specifically about heat.

BIG_DADDY
04-25-2008, 04:17 PM
No wonder you're so anti-doctor. You've apparently never had one treat you like a human being. Sad for you :(

Out of all the people that post here I find the relationship I have with you to be the least rewarding considering the potential. You obviously not only have a true concern for your health, you actually take some responsibility for your own and are not too lazy to do some of your own research. This is really rare I gotta tell ya. The sad part is it is obviously much more important for you to try and be a dick than it is to network with some really good people. Truth is I know a lot of doctors and network with some awesome guys. I am truly blessed in having access to some great medical minds when I am not satisfied with some of the answers I am getting. Along with these doctors there are several other people I am close to who have similar interests that network with others I do not have access to. This makes my life much easier.

Obviously you know it all at 27 though and don't need anyone but yourself and some disinformation that you have read already Dr. Soy so I'll just leave it at that. It's a shame though. If you ever make it through the smoke that being sold sold to you as healthy in this country you might actually find something that will allow you to help yourself and somebody else one day.

Silock
04-25-2008, 04:33 PM
Out of all the people that post here I find the relationship I have with you to be the least rewarding considering the potential. You obviously not only have a true concern for your health, you actually take some responsibility for your own and are not too lazy to do some of your own research. This is really rare I gotta tell ya. The sad part is it is obviously much more important for you to try and be a dick than it is to network with some really good people. Truth is I know a lot of doctors and network with some awesome guys. I am truly blessed in having access to some great medical minds when I am not satisfied with some of the answers I am getting. Along with these doctors there are several other people I am close to who have similar interests that network with others I do not have access to. This makes my life much easier.

Obviously you know it all at 27 though and don't need anyone but yourself and some disinformation that you have read already Dr. Soy so I'll just leave it at that. It's a shame though. If you ever make it through the smoke that being sold sold to you as healthy in this country you might actually find something that will allow you to help yourself and somebody else one day.

I just don't understand your semi-snide comments about doctors "coming clean" or ridiculing you for questioning their decisions. Some doctors may do that, but I feel that's a totally unfair way to categorize doctors. They're not out to get one over on you. They're just trying to do their best, and like all humans, they sometimes get it wrong.

I never said I know it all, and I apologize if I come off that way. However, I don't see any difference between your attitude and mine, so if you're calling me out on that, perhaps you should take a good, long look in the mirror as well.

Bill Parcells
04-25-2008, 05:42 PM
Eat Oat Meal for breakfast every day.

http://www.crystalradio.net/oatbox/newquickoats.jpg

I'm 42 and I had blood work done in February. my cholesterol was 117 and my doctor told me to watch my diet and exercise. :eek: the problem is that I already do work out and watch my diet. I have a family history of diabetes and heart disease.

Good luck bud.

ChiefsFan4Life
08-26-2008, 01:24 PM
Sure-Oz I am curious how you are doing and if anything worked for you

tooge
08-26-2008, 01:56 PM
Want to avoid the drugs? Here is a simple list of dos and don'ts that will have you where you need to be in 6 mos or so. If not, it is genetic and you are gonna have to do something else

Do: eat uncooked monounsaturated oils (olive oil) ie:salads
eat lots of raw fiber (whole or cracked oats, fruits and vegetables, beans)
do drink in moderation (1 or 2 glasses of wine or beer per night)
good foods- avacado, nuts, oats, fruit, veggies, fish, chicken
Don't: Smoke
Drink in excess
Eat processed fats (trans fats, saturated fats, polyunsaturated fats)
bad foods-fatty beef, anything fried, processed foods (crackers, chips, etc)

Get 5 servings a day of the Do's and no more than 1 per week of the don'ts and you should be where you want to be as far as the ratio of HDL to LDL. This does wonders for diabetes as well.

Mr. Flopnuts
08-26-2008, 01:57 PM
I'm sure you've gotten lots of good advice here just scanning the first page. That said, to put it in perspective for you, when I weighed in at 430lbs back in January my cholesterol was 135. It's now down to about 110. I hope you're able to lick it, it's the silent killer.

Sure-Oz
08-26-2008, 02:31 PM
Sure-Oz I am curious how you are doing and if anything worked for you

I haven't gotten checked out in awhile, but I have been eating oatmeal for breakfast and pretty much watching what i eat. I have totally cut out fast food, chips and pop. I have started to eat alot of fruits and vegetables, the gf makes some healthy stuf for me as well. I also drink a ton of water, so im hoping that when i go to the doctors for a checkup here in a week or two it will be better...:)

Just making the choice to eat better....i really do feel alot better too

btw-lots of great advice on this thread that i appreciate from you all!

MVChiefFan
08-26-2008, 02:38 PM
See the mac and cheese thread... that should do the trick.

DaneMcCloud
08-26-2008, 02:39 PM
I'm sure you've gotten lots of good advice here just scanning the first page. That said, to put it in perspective for you, when I weighed in at 430lbs back in January my cholesterol was 135. It's now down to about 110. I hope you're able to lick it, it's the silent killer.

This just proves what my doctor has told me since last year: 90% of the time, it's not about diet, it's about your genes.

Personally, I'd suggest seeing your doctor and taking the prescribed medication. You have a history of heart disease in your family and without proper medication, you may follow their path.

Cholesterol is created by the liver. While unhealthy eating habits can contribute to high cholesterol levels, more than 90% of those with high cholesterol have a genetic issue, not an dietary issue.

Cholesterol is created by the liver. If your body at age 28 is creating too much cholesterol (240 - danger zone), just imagine how much your liver will be creating as you age.

I had my cholesterol measured at age forty during a life insurance physical. It was 195 (on the high side). I had been eating hard-boiled eggs after each workout and attributed it to the egss (one egg has more cholesterol than is recommended each day). A year later, I had a full physical and my cholesterol measured over 300! The doctor and the nurses were astounded, saying that with my body type and body fat (very athletic), they thought it would be around 190. So I re-tested on week later and after eating only organic berry smoothies and low-sodium and low-cholesterol soup, my cholesterol was STILL 300. My doctor explained to me that he's had 350 pound people in with a cholesterol level of 160 and a 160 pound person in with a level of 300. It's genetics, though diet can help.

I went on Simvastatin (Zocor 20mg) and after 5 months, it's back down to 206. I'll be re-tested in June but I can happily say that I've felt no side effects, whatsoever.

IF you're planning to avoid medication and try to deal with your cholesterol through dieting, keep in mind that you're going to have to be extremely disciplined and even in doing so, your levels may not drop a point. Additionally, if you're going to avoid medication, my advice would be to get checked every year. You dont want it to sky-rocket and go unchecked, as with your family history, it may lead to serious implications.

jidar
08-26-2008, 02:45 PM
Jesus ****ing christ people do not take health advise from Big Daddy. This guy is a ****ing fruit cake and he's going to get people killed. Talk to your ****ing Dr.

Listen, modern medicine isn't perfect and the system can suck sometimes but the fact is societies without modern medicine have life expectancies that are fractions of what we have here. Use it.

Skip Towne
08-26-2008, 02:51 PM
Do your research on this one dog before you take any drugs. The case against cholesterol is well, hell I gotta go read this:

Cholesterol is NOT the Cause of Heart Disease





Ron Rosedale, MD

By Ron Rosedale, MD

Cholesterol is not the major culprit in heart disease or any disease. If it becomes oxidized it can irritate/inflame tissues in which it is lodged in, such as the endothelium (lining of the arteries). This would be one of numerous causes of chronic inflammation that can injure the lining of arteries. However, many good fats are easily oxidized such as omega-3 fatty acids, but it does not mean that you should avoid it at all costs.

Common sense would indicate that we should avoid the oxidation (rancidity) of cholesterol and fatty acids and not get rid of important life-giving molecules. Using the same conventional medical thinking that is being used for cholesterol would lead one to believe that doctors should reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease by taking out everybody's brain.

In fact, cholesterol is being transported to tissues as part of an inflammatory response that is there to repair damage.

The fixation on cholesterol as a major cause of heart disease defies the last 15 years of science and deflects from real causes such as the damage (via glycation) that sugars such as glucose and fructose inflict on tissues, including the lining of arteries, causing chronic inflammation and resultant plaque.

Insulin & Leptin Resistance

Hundreds of excellent scientific articles have linked insulin resistance and more recently leptin resistance to cardiovascular disease much more strongly than cholesterol, and they are in fact at least partially responsible for cholesterol abnormalities. For instance, insulin and leptin resistance result in "small dense" LDL particles and a greater number of particles.

This is much more important than the total cholesterol number. Because of particle size shift to small and dense, the total LDL cholesterol could still be low even though the number of particles and the density of the particles is greater. Small, dense LDL particles can squeeze between the cells lining the inside of the arteries, the "gap junction" of the endothelium, where they can get stuck and potentially oxidize, turn rancid, and cause inflammation of the lining of the arteries and plaque formation.

Importantly, many solid scientific studies have shown a mechanistic, causal effect of elevated insulin and leptin on heart and vascular disease, whereas almost all studies with cholesterol misleadingly only show an association. Association does not imply cause. For instance, something else may be causing lipid abnormalities such as elevated cholesterol and triglycerides, and also causing heart disease.

This "something else" is improper insulin and leptin signaling. Similarly, sugar does not cause diabetes; sugar is just listening to orders. Improper insulin and leptin signaling is the cause of diabetes. Likewise, cholesterol does not cause heart disease, but improper metabolic signals including improper signals to cholesterol (causing it to oxidize) and perhaps to the liver that manufactures the cholesterol, will cause heart and vascular disease and hypertension.

Removing cholesterol will do nothing to improve the underlying problems, the real roots of chronic disease, which will always have to do with improper communication, and the generals of metabolic communication are insulin and leptin. They are really what must be treated to reverse heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, obesity, and to some extent aging itself.

Cholesterol; Wrongly Accused?

Before we can begin to talk about the real cause and effective treatment for heart and blood vessel disease, we must first look at what is known, or I should say what we think we know. The first thing that comes to mind when one hears about heart disease is almost always cholesterol. Cholesterol and heart disease has been almost synonymous for the last half-century. Cholesterol has been portrayed as the Darth Vader to our arteries and our heart.

The latest recommendation given by a so-called panel of "experts" recommends that a person's cholesterol be as low as possible, in fact to a level so low they say it cannot be achieved by diet, exercise, or any known lifestyle modification. Therefore, they say cholesterol-lowering drugs; particularly the so-called "statins" need to be given to anyone at high risk of heart disease. Since heart disease is the number one killer in this country that would include most adults and even many children. The fact that this might add to the $26 billion in sales of statin drugs last year I'm sure played no role in their recommendations.

Or did it?

Expert Conflict of Interests

Major consumer groups think so. They found out that eight of the nine "experts" that made the recommendations were on the payroll of pharmaceutical companies that manufacture those drugs. Major scientific organizations have chastised medical journals for allowing the pharmaceutical industry to publish misleading results and half-truths. There is a major push under way to force the pharmaceutical industry (and others) to publish results of all of their studies, and not just the ones that appear positive. The studies that showed negative results would be forced to be published also.

It could be that lowering cholesterol might not be as healthy as we are being told. More and more studies are coming out showing just how unhealthy lowering cholesterol might be, particularly by the use of statin drugs. In particular, statin drugs have been shown to be harmful to muscles causing considerable damage. A common symptom of this damage is muscular aches and pains that many patients experience on cholesterol-lowering drugs, however most do not realize that these drugs are to blame.

Hmm...isn't the heart a muscle?

Statin Drugs Actually Increase Heart Disease

Indeed, low cholesterol levels have been shown to worsen patients with congestive heart failure, a life-threatening condition where the heart becomes too weak to effectively pump blood. Statin drugs have been shown to also cause nerve damage and to greatly impair memory. One reason that statin drugs have these various serious side effects is that they work by inhibiting a vital enzyme that manufactures cholesterol in the liver. However, the same enzyme is used to manufacture coenzyme Q10, which is a biochemical needed to transfer energy from food to our cells to be used for the work of staying alive and healthy.

Statin drugs are known to inhibit our very important production of coenzyme Q10. Importantly, while many cardiologists insist that lowering cholesterol is correlated with a reduction in the risk of heart attacks; few can say that there is a reduction in the risk of mortality (death). That has been much harder to show. In other words it has never been conclusively shown that lowering cholesterol saves lives. In fact, several large studies have shown that lowering cholesterol into the range currently recommended is correlated with an increased risk of dying, especially of cancer.

No Such Thing as Good and Bad Cholesterol

Because the correlation of total cholesterol with heart disease is so weak, many years ago a stronger correlation was sought. It was found that there is so-called "good cholesterol" called HDL, and that the so-called "bad cholesterol" was LDL. HDL stands for high-density lipoprotein, and LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein. Notice please that LDL and HDL are lipoproteins -- fats combined with proteins. There is only one cholesterol. There is no such thing as a good or a bad cholesterol. Cholesterol is just cholesterol. It combines with other fats and proteins to be carried through the bloodstream, since fat and our watery blood do not mix very well.

Fatty substances therefore must be shuttled to and from our tissues and cells using proteins. LDL and HDL are forms of proteins and are far from being just cholesterol. In fact we now know there are many types of these fat and protein particles. LDL particles come in many sizes and large LDL particles are not a problem. Only the so-called small dense LDL particles can potentially be a problem, because they can squeeze through the lining of the arteries and if they oxidize, otherwise known as turning rancid, they can cause damage and inflammation. Thus, you might say that there is "good LDL" and "bad LDL." Also, some HDL particles are better than others. Knowing just your total cholesterol tells you very little. Even knowing your LDL and HDL levels do not tell you very much.

A mistake that is rarely made in the hard-core sciences such as physics seems to be frequently made in medicine. This is confusing correlation with cause. There may be a weak correlation of elevated cholesterol with heart attacks, however this does not mean it is the cholesterol that caused the heart attack. Certainly gray hair is correlated with getting older; however one could hardly say that the gray hair caused one to get old. Using hair dye to reduce the gray hair would not really make you any younger. Neither it appears would just lowering your cholesterol.

Perhaps something else is causing both the gray hair and aging. Even if elevated cholesterol were significant and heart disease (which I question) perhaps something else is causing the elevated cholesterol and also causing the heart disease.

Let's look little more at cholesterol or, as Paul Harvey was fond of saying, "the rest of the story." First and foremost, cholesterol is a vital component of every cell membrane on Earth. In other words, there is no life on Earth they can live without cholesterol. They will automatically tell you that, in of itself, it cannot be evil. In fact it is one of our best friends. We would not be here without it. No wonder lowering cholesterol too much increases one's risk of dying. Cholesterol also is a precursor to all of the steroid hormones. You cannot make estrogen, testosterone, cortisone, and a host of other vital hormones without cholesterol.

Cholesterol Is The Hero, Not The Villain.

It was determined many years ago that the majority of cholesterol in your bloodstream comes from what your liver is manufacturing and distributing. The amount of cholesterol that one eats plays little role in determining your cholesterol levels. It is also known that HDL shuttles cholesterol away from tissues, and away from your arteries, back to your liver. That is why HDL is called the "good cholesterol;" because it is supposedly taking cholesterol away from your arteries. But let's think about that.

Why does your liver make sure that you have plenty of cholesterol?
Why is HDL taking cholesterol back to your liver?
Why not take it right to your kidneys, or your intestines to get rid of it?
It is taking it back to your liver so that your liver can recycle it; put it back into other particles to be taken to tissues and cells that need it. Your body is trying to make and conserve the cholesterol for the precise reason that it is so important, indeed vital, for health.

One function of cholesterol is to keep your cell membranes from falling apart. As such, you might consider cholesterol your cells "superglue." It is a necessary ingredient in any sort of cellular repair. The coronary disease associated with heart attacks is now known to be caused from damage to the lining of those arteries. That damage causes inflammation. The coronary disease that causes heart attacks is now considered to be caused mostly from chronic inflammation.

What Is Inflammation?

Think of what happens if you were to cut your hand. Within a fraction of a second, chemicals are released by the damaged tissue to initiate the process known as inflammation. Inflammation will allow that little cut to heal, and indeed to keep you from dying. The cut blood vessels constrict to keep you from bleeding too much. Blood becomes "thicker" so that it can clot. Cells and chemicals from the immune system are alerted to come to the area to keep intruders such as viruses and bacteria from invading the cut. Other cells are told to multiply to repair the damage so that you can heal. When the repair is completed, you have lived to be careless another day, though you may have a small scar to show for your troubles.

We now know that similar events take place within the lining of our arteries. When damage occurs to the lining of our arteries (or even elsewhere) chemicals are released to initiate the process of inflammation. Arteries constrict, blood becomes more prone to clot, white blood cells are called to the area to gobble up damaged debris, and cells adjacent to those damaged are told to multiply. Ultimately, scars form, however inside our arteries we call it plaque. And the constriction of our arteries and the "thickening" of our blood further predisposes us to high blood pressure and heart attacks.

So Where Might Cholesterol Fit Into All Of This?

When damage is occurring and inflammation is being initiated, chemicals are being released so that that damage can be repaired. One could speculate that to replace damaged, old and worn-out cells the liver needs to be notified to either recycle or manufacture cholesterol since no cell, human or otherwise, can be made without it. In this case, cholesterol is being manufactured and distributed in your bloodstream to help you repair damaged tissue and in fact to keep you alive.

If excessive damage is occurring such that it is necessary to distribute extra cholesterol through the bloodstream, it would not seem very wise to merely lower the cholesterol and forget about why it is there in the first place. It would seem much smarter to reduce the extra need for the cholesterol -- the excessive damage that is occurring, the reason for the chronic inflammation.

So Why Take Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs?

The pharmaceutical companies thought that you might think that. They went back to the drawing board. They did more "research" and found (coincidentally) that statin drugs had anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore we're currently being told to stay on our cholesterol-lowering drugs because now they work by reducing inflammation and perhaps not even by reducing cholesterol, and in fact perhaps in spite of it. Aspirin reduces inflammation for a lot less money. So does vitamin E, and fish oil, and dietary changes without the dangers of drugs and having many other benefits instead.

What About Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are just medical terminology for fat. A person with high triglycerides has a lot of fat in the bloodstream. Triglycerides are generally measured when a person has fasted overnight. High fasting triglycerides are either from manufacturing too much, or using (burning) too little. In other words, what high triglycerides are telling you is that you are making too much fat and you are unable to burn it. This indeed is a major problem. The inability to burn fat underlies virtually all of the chronic diseases of aging, and in fact may contribute to the rate of aging itself.

As such, one might think that the control of fat burning and storage might be very important in heart disease, and the other diseases of aging such as diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, and even cancer. Indeed, this appears to very much be the case. The two hormones that to a major extent control our ability to burn and store fat, insulin and leptin, appear to play a major role in all of the chronic diseases of aging. I would call them the most important hormones, indeed chemicals in the entire body. But that is a story for next time.

Is there going to be a test on this?

penguinz
08-26-2008, 02:58 PM
Jesus ****ing christ people do not take health advise from Big Daddy. This guy is a ****ing fruit cake and he's going to get people killed. Talk to your ****ing Dr.

Listen, modern medicine isn't perfect and the system can suck sometimes but the fact is societies without modern medicine have life expectancies that are fractions of what we have here. Use it.I do not agree with a lot of what Big Daddy says about health but for some one at the age of 28 he is correct. The first thing that should be done is an attempt to control it with a healthy diet and exercise. If it is still high after trying to fix the natural way then look towards the drugs.

Groves
08-26-2008, 03:26 PM
Even the fine print of the ads for the blockers like lipitor, etc state that it doesn't reduce your likelihood of heart disease or heart attacks.

They mostly just make your cholesterol number go down without any of the benefits that you think of with having a lower number. The fine print fails to mention this, of course.

FAX
08-26-2008, 03:52 PM
I'm curious about something. Why do peeps refer to peeps who are attentive to their health and well-being "health nuts"? It seems to me that those are the peeps who are most sane and the peeps who gorge themselves on dangerous food and never exercise are the actual "nuts".

FAX

Sure-Oz
08-26-2008, 04:05 PM
I'm curious about something. Why do peeps refer to peeps who are attentive to their health and well-being "health nuts"? It seems to me that those are the peeps who are most sane and the peeps who gorge themselves on dangerous food and never exercise are the actual "nuts".

FAX

I refer to people that are "health nuts" as people with great knowledge of food/healthy lifestyle. My gf thought I was a nut for eating fast food, which i have recently shutout. I exercise though, just needed to get into eating better.

Jilly
08-26-2008, 04:09 PM
I am 28 and just got back some blood test. Saying i have a 240 in cholesterol. This is pretty high for my age isn't it? I haven't been exercising the past several months and have eaten alot of bad food (moms foreign spicy cooking) and fast meals. My blood sugar is fine and my liver etc is great, just the cholesterol is high. What are some suggestions on diet? I know i need to start running like i used and exercise more. I don't want to be like my dad who had a 5 bypass surgery and has diabetes. I am 6'2 190lbs...(im not "fat") Thanks

I currently suffer from achalasia and gerd so i am not the healthiest, but i manage.

I echo the fiber intake (eat good fruits - my dietician said cantaloupe is the best for fiber); drink water; and eat less more frequently. So space your calories out throughout the day.

FAX
08-26-2008, 04:09 PM
I refer to people that are "health nuts" as people with great knowledge of food/healthy lifestyle. My gf thought I was a nut for eating fast food, which i have recently shutout.

Please don't take my post the wrong way. I certainly didn't mean to cast asparagus in your direction, Mr. Sure-Oz. It's a common term. Everybody uses it, including me. I just think it's interesting that the "nuts" are termed as the ones who are actually making wise, short-term life decisions whereas the Big Mac peeps (and I have certainly had my share) are considered as not being "nuts". Just seems like it ought to be the opposite.

EDIT: I wonder if McDonalds had something to do with popularizing this term?

FAX

Sure-Oz
08-26-2008, 04:10 PM
Please don't take my post the wrong way. I certainly didn't mean to cast asparagus in your direction, Mr. Sure-Oz. It's a common term. Everybody uses it, including me. I just think it's interesting that the "nuts" are termed as the ones who are actually making wise, short-term life decisions whereas the Big Mac peeps (and I have certainly had my share) are considered as not being "nuts". Just seems like it ought to be the opposite.

FAX

LMAO

I didn't take it personally...i can say i don't miss the feeling after eating a big mac.:doh!: I agree with you...

Sure-Oz
08-26-2008, 04:12 PM
I echo the fiber intake (eat good fruits - my dietician said cantaloupe is the best for fiber); drink water; and eat less more frequently. So space your calories out throughout the day.

I've been working on that part, i still have a tendency to get hungry alot, probably cause im bored, so i drink alot of water.

FAX
08-26-2008, 04:17 PM
I've been working on that part, i still have a tendency to get hungry alot, probably cause im bored, so i drink alot of water.

I work from home a lot, Mr. Sure-Oz. As a result, I'm waaaayyy too close to a refrigerator for my own good. The beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX's solution was to put some fruit and almonds and stuff in bowls out on the counter. You know, make a nice display. That way, when I walk into the kitchen, I see this attractive bunch of grapes and bananas and oranges and apples and almonds and stuff in these cool bowls. Then, my impulse is to grab some fruit and a fistfull of almonds and I tend to avoid the fridge altogether. It works.

FAX

Sure-Oz
08-26-2008, 04:22 PM
I work from home a lot, Mr. Sure-Oz. As a result, I'm waaaayyy too close to a refrigerator for my own good. The beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX's solution was to put some fruit and almonds and stuff in bowls out on the counter. You know, make a nice display. That way, when I walk into the kitchen, I see this attractive bunch of grapes and bananas and oranges and apples and almonds and stuff in these cool bowls. Then, my impulse is to grab some fruit and a fistfull of almonds and I tend to avoid the fridge altogether. It works.

FAX

Sounds like a good idea...i'm going to have to do that, esp since i come home for lunch.

FAX
08-26-2008, 04:34 PM
Sounds like a good idea...i'm going to have to do that, esp since i come home for lunch.

I've learned that, for me at least, it's all about impulse control, Mr. Sure-Oz. Of which, unfortunately, I have very little. Also, like you, I can become bored fairly easily and eating is kind of a natural response. It turns out, though, if I eat small quantities of fruits and vegetables throughout the day, I can maintain my weight with no problem whatsoever. The method I've described of displaying good foods in an attractive, easily accessible manner seems to direct me toward eating better because it's quick, no hassle, and looks appetizing. Otherwise, I'd be diving into mountains of Triscuits and cheddar cheese. I'm not sure it would work for everybody, though.

FAX

Sure-Oz
08-26-2008, 04:42 PM
I've learned that, for me at least, it's all about impulse control, Mr. Sure-Oz. Of which, unfortunately, I have very little. Also, like you, I can become bored fairly easily and eating is kind of a natural response. It turns out, though, if I eat small quantities of fruits and vegetables throughout the day, I can maintain my weight with no problem whatsoever. The method I've described of displaying good foods in an attractive, easily accessible manner seems to direct me toward eating better because it's quick, no hassle, and looks appetizing. Otherwise, I'd be diving into mountains of Triscuits and cheddar cheese. I'm not sure it would work for everybody, though.

FAX

Definetly, i probably need to get some apples cut or something, get some celery sticks with peanut butter, who i am kidding, she'll probably do it for me since im a lazy ass when i get home....hehe...seirously though i think that would be a great idea as an alternative, cause i tend to want to snack and i can only drink so much water to make me full.

Jilly
08-26-2008, 05:24 PM
Definetly, i probably need to get some apples cut or something, get some celery sticks with peanut butter, who i am kidding, she'll probably do it for me since im a lazy ass when i get home....hehe...seirously though i think that would be a great idea as an alternative, cause i tend to want to snack and i can only drink so much water to make me full.

It's a little work, but I always cut the celery and put it in baggies and the same with carrots...it makes it a lot more accessible. I also think it's okay to have like triscuits and cheese, etc. Just not the whole box. That takes discipline, but if you're eating good foods throughout the day, when you go for that snack, you're not as apt to overeat.

MahiMike
08-26-2008, 06:40 PM
Cholesterol was invented by the AMA to sell statin drugs. Some people just have high cholesterol. I do. Mine's 240 too. I'm 5'11" 188 and in great shape. I hardly eat bad stuff. My dad eats bacon and eggs every day, ways 240 and his cholesterol is 160.

Whatever you do - don't let your doctors put you on any drugs! Mine recommended Lipitor and then my liver counts went thru the roof! Now I can't get health insurance because of it.

What a racket.

djrcmay
08-26-2008, 07:45 PM
sausage and eggs!