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KurtCobain
05-23-2008, 03:57 PM
I have a few hours to kill tonight and I was gonna find a something to read at the library. But then I realize I don't know of any books outside of the harry potter books and the outsiders. I'm 19, I'm male, and I don't like scifi. Or Romance. Give me an idea.

Fried Meat Ball!
05-23-2008, 04:00 PM
Mario Puzo's The Godfather.

Fried Meat Ball!
05-23-2008, 04:01 PM
If you liked the movie, the book will friggin' blow you away.

Virtua Chief
05-23-2008, 04:02 PM
The Blind Side by Michael Lewis
If you like comics, I am reading Stephen King's Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born and it rocks

Count Zarth
05-23-2008, 04:02 PM
Shooter. The real life story of an elite sniper in Iraq.

High school confidential (24-year old guy infiltrates high school and poses as a student) is also riveting. Real story.

Ari Chi3fs
05-23-2008, 04:04 PM
Conversations with God - Neale Donald Walsch

not what you expect. Very intriguing.

Stewie
05-23-2008, 04:05 PM
Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah

by Richard Bach

bogey
05-23-2008, 04:06 PM
Playing for Pizza. John Grisham. Fun book about a failing NFL player that goes to Italy to play for Italian league football.

Bugeater
05-23-2008, 04:07 PM
Bringing Down the House by Ben Mezrich.

bogey
05-23-2008, 04:09 PM
Anyone have any suggestions for something fiction and funny?

FAX
05-23-2008, 04:10 PM
It's not exactly a book, but the February issue of Playboy was a pretty good read.

FAX

bogey
05-23-2008, 04:11 PM
It's not exactly a book, but the February issue of Playboy was a pretty good read.

FAX

So glad you came back.

bogey
05-23-2008, 04:12 PM
hahaha always so funny Fax. . :huh:

Wow, I was serious.

Virtua Chief
05-23-2008, 04:12 PM
My friend is reading Snuff by Chuck Palahniuk about a porn star who engages in a 600 man gangbang. It is told from three of the participants POV. Don't know how funny it is. Just came out too, so the library might not have it.

Ari Chi3fs
05-23-2008, 04:14 PM
Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah

by Richard Bach


When I finished reading that book... I went outside, and a blue jay flew up and landed on my deck and looked at me.

I was like WHOA.

FAX
05-23-2008, 04:15 PM
hahaha always so funny Fax. . :huh:

Yeah, I've been off my game. I think it's allergies. Unless you're a wealthy Columbian drug lord, it's hard to laugh and sniffle simultaneously.

I think can turn it around though. I'll go make fun of Mr. GoChiefs' t-shirts. That's always brilliant comedy.

FAX

FAX
05-23-2008, 04:16 PM
When I finished reading that book... I went outside, and a blue jay flew up and landed on my deck and looked at me.

I was like WHOA.

Spooky. Did you attempt communication? Blue Jay style, I mean?

FAX

DaneMcCloud
05-23-2008, 04:19 PM
If you liked the "Da Vinci Code" & "Angels & Demons", try "The Last Templar".

If you like history wrapped up with legendary myths, try "The Historian".

Or just wait for both movies.

Hydrae
05-23-2008, 04:19 PM
Playing for Pizza. John Grisham. Fun book about a failing NFL player that goes to Italy to play for Italian league football.

I'll second this as a good read. Definitely not one of his lawyer stories, that's for sure.

Ari Chi3fs
05-23-2008, 04:19 PM
Spooky. Did you attempt communication? Blue Jay style, I mean?

FAX

Have you read the book?

Ari Chi3fs
05-23-2008, 04:22 PM
If not, there was a part in it about manifesting a blue feather... so it was a bit surreal.

KurtCobain
05-23-2008, 04:22 PM
Or just wait for both movies.

I think I'll wait for the movies. I couldn't get into the Da Vinci Code, but the movie was ok.

bogey
05-23-2008, 04:22 PM
I'll second this as a good read. Definitely not one of his lawyer stories, that's for sure.

Yep. Also, I recommend A Painted House by the same author.

DaFace
05-23-2008, 04:24 PM
I've always enjoyed "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" myself. Perhaps there's an "Abridged Works of Dr. Seuss" out there somewhere.

bogey
05-23-2008, 04:26 PM
I've always enjoyed "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" myself. Perhaps there's an "Abridged Works of Dr. Seuss" out there somewhere.

I have read that book over and over and over and over and over and over and over again.

FAX
05-23-2008, 04:27 PM
Have you read the book?

No. Just the liner notes and then filled in the blanks.

FAX

Bugeater
05-23-2008, 04:29 PM
I've always enjoyed "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" myself. Perhaps there's an "Abridged Works of Dr. Seuss" out there somewhere.
I tried to read this (http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/dreeves/Fox-In-Socks.txt) to my son ONE TIME. That book went straight into the fuggin' garbage after that.

bogey
05-23-2008, 04:36 PM
I tried to read this (http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/dreeves/Fox-In-Socks.txt) to my son ONE TIME. That book went straight into the fuggin' garbage after that.

Oh my, try to read that after a few gins. I don't remember the book, but I remember one night after my wife and I had spent a rare night out at a party and I had a few too many, tucking my kid in and trying to read a book to her. I had to pick a different book because I couldn't get the words to roll off of my tongue.

NewChief
05-23-2008, 04:52 PM
http://chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=137161

ChiefaRoo
05-23-2008, 04:55 PM
If you like easy to read and interesting Science then try anything by Michio Kaku.

noa
05-23-2008, 04:55 PM
Anyone have any suggestions for something fiction and funny?

Confederacy of Dunces, if you haven't read it.

If you're looking for something shorter, I think Christopher Moore is a really funny writer and its really light stuff. My favorite is Lamb: The Gospel According To Biff, who was Jesus' best pal. Its actually really well written and researched and not at all offensive to the story of Jesus.

bogey
05-23-2008, 04:58 PM
Confederacy of Dunces, if you haven't read it.

If you're looking for something shorter, I think Christopher Moore is a really funny writer and its really light stuff. My favorite is Lamb: The Gospel According To Biff, who was Jesus' best pal. Its actually really well written and researched and not at all offensive to the story of Jesus.

Thanks.

Adept Havelock
05-23-2008, 04:58 PM
"The Charm School" by Nelson De<ille

Great cold-war era spy thriller. Fast paced, interesting characters, and some great twists.

"Earth Abides" - George Stewart

Big plague wipes out almost everyone while main character is camping out. Comes back to an almost empty world. Follows him as he journeys through America and forms the nucleus of a small tribe of survivors until he is "The Last American".

"War Day"- James Kunetka and Whitley Streiber

Written as a series of interviews and stories from the perspective of two travelers going through America 5 years after a very small nuclear war.

"The Dark Side of the Game" - Tim Green

Insider stories about the "Dark Side" of playing in the NFL

"When Pride Still Mattered" - David Maraness

Biography of the greatest NFL coach ever, Vince Lombardi

ChiefaRoo
05-23-2008, 05:05 PM
Harrington on Hold'em (as in Texas Hold'em) volumes 1,2 and 3 by Dan Harrington are all excellent if you really want to learn how to play competitive poker.

keg in kc
05-23-2008, 05:06 PM
"War Day"- James Kunetka and Whitley Streiber

Written as a series of interviews and stories from the perspective of two travelers going through America 5 years after a very small nuclear war.I've read that, good book. I think it's out of print, but there's tons of copies available through amazon.

Adept Havelock
05-23-2008, 05:21 PM
I've read that, good book. I think it's out of print, but there's tons of copies available through amazon.

I remember reading it back in '85 and thinking "could it really be this bad after losing 3 cities, the Dakotas, and Wyoming?". Over the years I've come to believe they might have underestimated the fragmentation of our society. Chilling stuff.

NewChief
05-23-2008, 05:23 PM
I'll second Chuck Pahlanuik (sp?). Most guys your age tend to like him. If you've seen the movie Fight Club, the book is still worth reading. You might prefer getting something different, though.

The Kite Runner by Khaleid Houisenni (sp?) is excellent and people from young to old tend to love the book.

Psyko Tek
05-23-2008, 05:28 PM
funny

Good omens
by
terry pratchett and neil gamman

monty python esk look at an oncoming apacolypse

Joie
05-23-2008, 05:33 PM
Read Tom Clancy's "Without Remorse"

You'll then spend the next year or two of your life reading every book in the Ryanverse series. Make sure you read them in the right order, though.

If anyone's interested in the correct order, just let me know and I'll post it.

TrickyNicky
05-23-2008, 05:37 PM
funny

Good omens
by
terry pratchett and neil gamman

monty python esk look at an oncoming apacolypse

Indeed. My only complaint about it was that it wasn't long enough.

Adept Havelock
05-23-2008, 05:37 PM
Read Tom Clancy's "Without Remorse"

You'll then spend the next year or two of your life reading every book in the Ryanverse series. Make sure you read them in the right order, though.

If anyone's interested in the correct order, just let me know and I'll post it.

Good thriller. Love the quote just before the dedication:


Beware the fury of a patient man

I liked all of them, except The Bear and The Dragon. Too little story, way too preachy.

I'd also suggest "Red Storm Rising". It's not a Ryan book, but a fun "What-If" the Soviets had invaded Western Europe with only conventional weapons.

Rain Man
05-23-2008, 05:39 PM
"You Shall Know Our Velocity", by Dave Eggers. It's exceedingly well-written and engaging.

NewChief
05-23-2008, 05:42 PM
"You Shall Know Our Velocity", by Dave Eggers. It's exceedingly well-written and engaging.

It's not quite as cool as it once was, but "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius" is also a book that's popular with the college age crowd.

Joie
05-23-2008, 05:47 PM
Good thriller. Love the quote just before the dedication:



I liked all of them, except The Bear and The Dragon. Too little story, way too preachy.

I'd also suggest "Red Storm Rising". It's not a Ryan book, but a fun "What-If" the Soviets had invaded Western Europe with only conventional weapons.

Did you read "The Teeth of the Tiger"? Not the best...it's about Jack Jr.

FAX
05-23-2008, 06:03 PM
"The Well On Everett's Pass"

The delightful coming of age tale about a curious teenaged boy who discovers an abandon well in the mountains and learns that the water was poisoned years ago by the man who killed his parents and left him for dead. Raised by a family of racoons, the boy learns the ways of the forest and secret magical phrases he finds on mysterious stone tablets that can bring ultimate happiness and shrink an enemy's genitals to an embarrassingly small size. Suggested for ages 12 and up. Not recommended for goat fans.

FAX

Frazod
05-23-2008, 06:09 PM
Without Remorse rocks. :thumb:

crispystl420
05-23-2008, 06:14 PM
[QUOTE=joey;4764959]I have a few hours to kill tonight and I was gonna find a something to read at the library. But then I realize I don't know of any books outside of the harry potter books and the outsiders. I'm 19, I'm male, and I don't like scifi. Or Romance. Give me an idea.

You should read forgotten soldier by Guy Sajer? I think. He was a german soldier who fought on the eastern front against the Russians (obviously) It involves the hardships involved with the russian winter and the war in general. If you like personal recollections of wars and specific details of what it was like to be there this is a very good read. Not to mention after you read it you will be thankful for everything youhave trust me.

Adept Havelock
05-23-2008, 06:15 PM
Did you read "The Teeth of the Tiger"? Not the best...it's about Jack Jr.

I gave up on Mr. Clancy's fiction halfway through "Red Rabbit", and found the same problems I had with "Bear and the Dragon".

I do enjoy his Non-Fiction works, especially "Into the Storm" and "Every Man a Tiger".


You should read forgotten soldier by Guy Sajer? I think. He was a german soldier who fought on the eastern front against the Russians (obviously) It involves the hardships involved with the russian winter and the war in general. If you like personal recollections of wars and specific details of what it was like to be there this is a very good read. Not to mention after you read it you will be thankful for everything youhave trust me.


That was fantastic. I'd also suggest "Enemy at the Gates" by Craig. It's a great history of the battle of Stalingrad.

Jenson71
05-23-2008, 06:15 PM
The Chosen - Chiam Potek

The Devil in the White City - Erik Larson

The Name of the Rose - Umberto Eco

All Quiet on the Western Front - Erich Maria Remarque

Joie
05-23-2008, 06:29 PM
I gave up on Mr. Clancy's fiction halfway through "Red Rabbit", and found the same problems I had with "Bear and the Dragon".

I do enjoy his Non-Fiction works, especially "Into the Storm" and "Every Man a Tiger".




That was fantastic. I'd also suggest "Enemy at the Gates" by Craig. It's a great history of the battle of Stalingrad.

There were a few books in the series that were hard to read. "The Cardinal of the Kremlin" was by far the best, "Without Remorse", "Clear and Present Danger", and "The Hunt for Red October" were also very good. I enjoyed the majority of the books....the only one I can really say I was unhappy with is "The Teeth of the Tiger". I felt Clancy was using it to wrap up the series, and he could have done a much better job.

crispystl420
05-23-2008, 06:33 PM
I gave up on Mr. Clancy's fiction halfway through "Red Rabbit", and found the same problems I had with "Bear and the Dragon".

I do enjoy his Non-Fiction works, especially "Into the Storm" and "Every Man a Tiger".




That was fantastic. I'd also suggest "Enemy at the Gates" by Craig. It's a great history of the battle of Stalingrad.

Great thanks for reminding me about that book I was looking for another book invloving the eastern front.

crispystl420
05-23-2008, 06:36 PM
The Chosen - Chiam Potek

The Devil in the White City - Erik Larson

The Name of the Rose - Umberto Eco

All Quiet on the Western Front - Erich Maria Remarque



Yeah All Quiet on the Western Front was great read too. It was very short though*

*actually I should note that I read it in a bundle book that had like 5 books made into one. So i have always wondered if I had read the whole thing or just a lrge section.

crispystl420
05-23-2008, 06:36 PM
The Chosen - Chiam Potek

The Devil in the White City - Erik Larson

The Name of the Rose - Umberto Eco

All Quiet on the Western Front - Erich Maria Remarque



Yeah All Quiet on the Western Front was great read too. It was very short though*

*actually I should note that I read it in a bundle book that had like 5 books made into one. So I have always wondered if I read the whole thing or just a large section.

cdcox
05-23-2008, 08:54 PM
Try "Papillon". It is an autobiographical tale of a man's time in a French Penal Colony. It's validity as a true story has been, shall we say, questioned, but it's a great read regardless of whether it is fact, fiction or somewhere in between. I probably read that book 3 or 4 times during my high school and college years.

Skip Towne
05-23-2008, 08:57 PM
Atlas Shrugged - Ayn Rand

FAX
05-23-2008, 08:58 PM
"Donna's Bad Day" - Elaine McGrew

A compelling account of a young lady's efforts to redeem herself after removing her clothes on the subway and calling on the name of Pishtar to rain blue ink and graham particles down on humanity.

FAX

badgirl
05-23-2008, 08:59 PM
I have a few hours to kill tonight and I was gonna find a something to read at the library. But then I realize I don't know of any books outside of the harry potter books and the outsiders. I'm 19, I'm male, and I don't like scifi. Or Romance. Give me an idea.

Any James Patterson books that has the character of Alex Cross such as Cross first then Double Cross, I love those two the best.:thumb:

KCChiefsMan
05-23-2008, 09:08 PM
I'm reading I Am Legend right now, pretty damn good so far. I know the movie came out but I wanted to read it anyways. Definately better than the movie so far.

Pablo
05-23-2008, 09:09 PM
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger

Good book, read it on a flight to Hawaii.

Joie
05-23-2008, 09:12 PM
"The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck (plan to spend some time on it)

"To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee (one of the best books ever written IMO)

btlook1
05-23-2008, 10:03 PM
I'm reading I Am Legend right now, pretty damn good so far. I know the movie came out but I wanted to read it anyways. Definately better than the movie so far.

I enjoyed I Am Legend but it was way to short...could have been so much better. Try Point of Impact Stephen Hunter...he's a good writer that wrote Shooter...book was way better than the movie....they changed the story around quite a bit. Almost all of his books are pretty good!!
Another good one...Day by Day Armegeddon!

blaise
05-23-2008, 10:07 PM
A couple of books I would recommend to anyone:

You Know Me Al, by Ring Lardner. He writes it as a series of letters written by a sort of buffoonish baseball player to his friend back home. It's hilarious and Lardner does an awesome job of writing it. I love that book

The Southpaw, by Mark Harris. Another fictional baseball book. Great writing. Bang the Drum Slowly (which was made into a not great movie starring Robert DeNiro and Michael Moriarty) is a follow up to that book. Both are very good books.

I would also recommend Layer Cake, by JJ Connelly (sp?). That was later made into a film. It's about the London crime scene. Entertaining book for sure. I enjoyed the dialect in it.

2bikemike
05-23-2008, 10:40 PM
I enjoyed I Am Legend but it was way to short...could have been so much better. Try Point of Impact Stephen Hunter...he's a good writer that wrote Shooter...book was way better than the movie....they changed the story around quite a bit. Almost all of his books are pretty good!!
Another good one...Day by Day Armegeddon!

I read Point of Impact years ago. I was surprised when I set down to watch Shooter that it was based on Point of Impact. The story was changed quite a bit. I have read a few othr of Hunter's books but I can't recall the names of them. But I did enjoy them all.

NewChief
05-23-2008, 10:42 PM
"The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck (plan to spend some time on it)


My thesis was on Steinbeck. I think that East of Eden is probably his greatest work in many ways. It's epic and vast and a mess, but it's also awesome.

Some lesser know, but great shorter fiction of his:

In Dubious Battle (that was actually the work that my thesis focused on)
To a God Unknown (way ahead of its time and very interesting read)

Fish
05-23-2008, 10:48 PM
In Silent Graves
by Gary A. Braunbeck


creeeeeeepy.......
[/URL][URL="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Gary%20A.%20Braunbeck"] (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Gary%20A.%20Braunbeck)

FAX
05-23-2008, 10:59 PM
"Lights Out In New Jersey" - Malcolm Overby

The compelling, true story of Harold Hickston who, while texting his fiance, walked headlong into a bridge abutment, fell into a coma that lasted 17 years, and made medical history when he spontaneously began reciting Homer's Iliad in the original Greek.

FAX

Cavgrunt
05-23-2008, 11:37 PM
Lonesome Dove by Larry MacMurthy

Rain Man
05-24-2008, 12:46 AM
It's not quite as cool as it once was, but "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius" is also a book that's popular with the college age crowd.

I thought it was a fine book, and it's certainly the better known of the two, but I greatly preferred "Velocity". Maybe it's just because I always like a good road novel.

Rain Man
05-24-2008, 12:49 AM
You should read forgotten soldier by Guy Sajer? I think. He was a german soldier who fought on the eastern front against the Russians (obviously) It involves the hardships involved with the russian winter and the war in general. If you like personal recollections of wars and specific details of what it was like to be there this is a very good read. Not to mention after you read it you will be thankful for everything youhave trust me.

Yeah, awesome book. Mind-blowing, even for the jaded WWII buff. Were you in the group that was discussing it a couple of years back on this board?

Rain Man
05-24-2008, 12:53 AM
That was fantastic. I'd also suggest "Enemy at the Gates" by Craig. It's a great history of the battle of Stalingrad.

I would second that.

Rausch
05-24-2008, 01:09 AM
I would second that.

3rd.

And add the children's book Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler's Shadow (odd how honest they are in children's books. The photographs and personal stories are heartbreaking) for easy reading with Farnham's Freehold (an oft forgotten Heinlein gem) to fill the race relations, geopolotical, sci-fi bent to yer' personality...

noa
05-24-2008, 01:42 AM
My thesis was on Steinbeck. I think that East of Eden is probably his greatest work in many ways. It's epic and vast and a mess, but it's also awesome.

A few friends and I decided to re-read the East of Eden recently and it is all we have been talking about lately. Every conversation leads back to that book. Definitely in my top 10.

Rausch
05-24-2008, 01:48 AM
A few friends and I decided to re-read the Grapes of Wrath recently and it is all we have been talking about lately. Every conversation leads back to that book. Definitely in my top 10.

It might be due to my ADHD but I've never been able to finish it. I've tried. Hell, I've cheated at times to avoid trying.

And the odd thing is the theme and characters are right up my alley. It's my kind of story. I want to like it. I start reading....and...just.....was that a squirrel?

noa
05-24-2008, 01:53 AM
It might be due to my ADHD but I've never been able to finish it. I've tried. Hell, I've cheated at times to avoid trying.

And the odd thing is the theme and characters are right up my alley. It's my kind of story. I want to like it. I start reading....and...just.....was that a squirrel?

Haha, due to my drunkenness and it being really late, I see that I typed Grapes of Wrath instead of East of Eden. My bad.
I meant to talk about East of Eden.
Grapes of Wrath I definitely found boring.

Rausch
05-24-2008, 02:02 AM
Haha, due to my drunkenness and it being really late, I see that I typed Grapes of Wrath instead of East of Eden. My bad.
I meant to talk about East of Eden.

:hmmm:

Fish
05-24-2008, 09:38 AM
Black Cross

by Greg Iles

Jewish Commando kicking nazi ass.....

"Bob" Dobbs
05-24-2008, 09:52 AM
"The Charm School" by Nelson De<ILLE< p>
Great cold-war era spy thriller. Fast paced, interesting characters, and some great twists.

"Earth Abides" - George Stewart

Big plague wipes out almost everyone while main character is camping out. Comes back to an almost empty world. Follows him as he journeys through America and forms the nucleus of a small tribe of survivors until he is "The Last American".

"War Day"- James Kunetka and Whitley Streiber

Written as a series of interviews and stories from the perspective of two travelers going through America 5 years after a very small nuclear war.

"The Dark Side of the Game" - Tim Green

Insider stories about the "Dark Side" of playing in the NFL

"When Pride Still Mattered" - David Maraness

Biography of the greatest NFL coach ever, Vince Lombardi
Holy shit, AH! We have almost identical tastes in books. War Day kicked ass, as did Charm School. Rep!

"Bob" Dobbs
05-24-2008, 10:00 AM
Also I gotta second the Tom Clancy suggestions. I'm currently rereading Debt of Honor.

Adept Havelock
05-24-2008, 10:01 AM
"The Odessa File" by Frederick Forsyth

"The Guns of the South" by Harry Turtledove

Holy shit, AH! We have almost identical tastes in books. War Day kicked ass, as did Charm School. Rep!

Thank you. If you're a Clancy fan, I'd also suggest Red Phoenix, Cauldron, and Vortex by Larry Bond (Clancy's co-author on Red Storm Rising). They are fun techno-thrillers.

Warrior5
05-24-2008, 11:35 AM
The Killer Angels by William Shaara

Gates of Fire by Steven Pressfield

Adept Havelock
05-24-2008, 11:59 AM
3rd.

And add the children's book Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler's Shadow (odd how honest they are in children's books. The photographs and personal stories are heartbreaking) for easy reading with Farnham's Freehold (an oft forgotten Heinlein gem) to fill the race relations, geopolotical, sci-fi bent to yer' personality...

Farnham's Freehold...great book, and very un-PC. :thumb:

For the Bard of Butler MO. , I'd also suggest The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, Starship Troopers, and Job:A Comedy of Justice. The first two are technically Sci-Fi, but the stories could easily be set in a mundane setting. ST is one of the best military adventure/coming of age stories ever.

Crashride
05-24-2008, 12:42 PM
"Donna's Bad Day" - Elaine McGrew

A compelling account of a young lady's efforts to redeem herself after removing her clothes on the subway and calling on the name of Pishtar to rain blue ink and graham particles down on humanity.

FAX

FAX your ****in killing me over here LMAO. Everyones being so serious and your throwing out these crazy ass books and no one notices. LOL. Thanks for the laugh/cry sir.

Joie
05-24-2008, 03:27 PM
Haha, due to my drunkenness and it being really late, I see that I typed Grapes of Wrath instead of East of Eden. My bad.
I meant to talk about East of Eden.
Grapes of Wrath I definitely found boring.

The Grapes of Wrath? Boring?

I loved that book. I was completely obsessed with it the entire time I was reading it (I tend to get that way about good books). Any free time I had was spent reading. I was sad when it ended.


Although...it isn't unusual for me to spend free time reading. My father-in-law teases me because I always have a book with me. You never know when you'll get bored.

Rain Man
05-24-2008, 04:36 PM
"The Guns of the South" by Harry Turtledove



Read "Guns of the South" and then never ever pick up another book by Turtledove again. That book is good, but all of his other books have dialogue like this:

"Eek!" she said.

"I'm going to kill you," he said.

"Eek, he's going to kill me!" she said.

"I'm going to shoot you with this gun," he said.

"Oh, no!" she said.

Bowser
05-24-2008, 04:45 PM
World War Z by Max Brooks

Written in the exact same style as Studs Terkel's "The Good War". Sci-fi, some humor, and a suprisingly honest look at the world we live in as of today.

KCKID58
05-24-2008, 04:47 PM
Anything from John Grisham.

FAX
05-24-2008, 04:51 PM
Read "Guns of the South" and then never ever pick up another book by Turtledove again. That book is good, but all of his other books have dialogue like this:

"Eek!" she said.

"I'm going to kill you," he said.

"Eek, he's going to kill me!" she said.

"I'm going to shoot you with this gun," he said.

"Oh, no!" she said.

I love those kinds of books, Mr. Rain Man. They're short, but the color pictures are cool.

FAX

Joie
05-24-2008, 04:53 PM
I love those kinds of books, Mr. Rain Man. They're short, but the color pictures are cool.

FAX

You like the "Dick and Jane" books from Kindergarten, don't you, Mr. FAX?

Joie
05-24-2008, 04:54 PM
Anything from John Grisham.

Agreed. Favorites are Runaway Jury, The Rainmaker and The Client.

Adept Havelock
05-24-2008, 05:20 PM
Read "Guns of the South" and then never ever pick up another book by Turtledove again. That book is good, but all of his other books have dialogue like this:

"Eek!" she said.

"I'm going to kill you," he said.

"Eek, he's going to kill me!" she said.

"I'm going to shoot you with this gun," he said.

"Oh, no!" she said.

I've read his entire alternate WW1-WW2 series, his "Worldwar" series, and the entire "Darkness" cycle, and can't argue with that at all. They are my literary Snickers bars. Horrible dialogue, and repetitive character descriptions. I'll go to my grave knowing Sam Yeager has store-bought teeth and Sam Carsten sunburns easily. LMAO

However, "In the Presence of My Enemies" (Jews living under deep cover in early 21st century Nazi Germany) and "Ruled Britannia" (Shakespeare as revolutionary in Spanish Armada-occupied England) manage to avoid his usual pitfalls. "The Two Georges" written with Richard Dreyfuss was pretty decent as well.

To be free, or not to be free, that is the question!

World War Z by Max Brooks

Written in the exact same style as Studs Terkel's "The Good War". Sci-fi, some humor, and a suprisingly honest look at the world we live in as of today.

The Good War is a favorite of mine (as is Hard Times by the same author). I've got to get WWZ. Anything written by Mel Brooks son has to be entertaining.

FAX
05-24-2008, 05:56 PM
You like the "Dick and Jane" books from Kindergarten, don't you, Mr. FAX?

Very much so, Ms. Joie. Jane is one of the classic characters in literature. Right up there with Sherlock Holmes and George Smiley.

One has to appreciate the historic endeavor with the pail as an exploration with coherent insight and sensitivity how the idealized human condition counterbalances the expectations and disappointments associated with man's struggle against the threat of potential poverty, starvation, and poor footing in the modern era.

FAX

Joie
05-24-2008, 05:59 PM
Very much so, Ms. Joie. Jane is one of the classic characters in literature. Right up there with Sherlock Holmes and George Smiley.

One has to appreciate the historic endeavor with the pail as an exploration with coherent insight and sensitivity how the idealized human condition counterbalances the expectations and disappointments associated with man's struggle against the threat of potential poverty, starvation, and poor footing in the modern era.

FAX

Plus there's how good you felt each time you finished one in Kindergarten. They lead the way to a lifelong love of literature.

BigOlChiefsfan
05-24-2008, 07:41 PM
Flashman by George MacDonald Fraser. There are 8 or 9 other books that follow - in no particular order - but start with this one. Very amusing, and you'll learn a little military history without even noticing it.

I know you said you don't like scifi, but everyone should read DUNE by Frank Herbert. Skip the sequels, but the original book is excellent.

Trouble Is My Business by Raymond Chandler, frankly anything by Chandler but this is a good one to start with, several novellas. He took Dashiell Hammett's detective (The Thin Man, the Maltese Falcoln) and made him more of a knight-errant, with a code of honor and some of the best dialogue of all time. Chandler, Hammett and James M. Cain are all worth your time.

FAX
05-24-2008, 08:20 PM
Plus there's how good you felt each time you finished one in Kindergarten. They lead the way to a lifelong love of literature.

True, Ms. Joie. Very true. And, as usual, you raise yet another interesting point. Now that I think of it, a lot of Kindergarten experiences foster later life inclinations.

For example, the "I'm A Little Teapot" dance no doubt contributed to my lifelong fascination with pottery.

FAX

Joie
05-24-2008, 08:29 PM
True, Ms. Joie. Very true. And, as usual, you raise yet another interesting point. Now that I think of it, a lot of Kindergarten experiences foster later life inclinations.

For example, the "I'm A Little Teapot" dance no doubt contributed to my lifelong fascination with pottery.

FAX

I love tea, Mr. Fax. Iced tea, herbal tea, green tea...all kinds of tea. Coincidence?

Adept Havelock
05-25-2008, 12:01 AM
True, Ms. Joie. Very true. And, as usual, you raise yet another interesting point. Now that I think of it, a lot of Kindergarten experiences foster later life inclinations.

For example, the "I'm A Little Teapot" dance no doubt contributed to my lifelong fascination with pottery.

FAX

I love tea, Mr. Fax. Iced tea, herbal tea, green tea...all kinds of tea. Coincidence?


I believe I may have just discerned the origin of my arachnophobia minimus. Thank you, Mr. FAX and Joie.

blueballs
05-25-2008, 01:15 AM
Finding the G spot for dummies
then you can sell the clift notes

burt
05-25-2008, 08:10 AM
Farnham's Freehold...great book, and very un-PC. :thumb:

For the Bard of Butler MO. , I'd also suggest The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, Starship Troopers, and Job:A Comedy of Justice. The first two are technically Sci-Fi, but the stories could easily be set in a mundane setting. ST is one of the best military adventure/coming of age stories ever.

and Job:A Comedy of Justice is so wierd it will twist your relity for a few days.

burt
05-25-2008, 08:15 AM
"The Second Son" by Charles Sailor. This book has everything. Politics, religion, suspense, super natural powers, asasins, and even nuclear holocaust. It is by far my favorite book. Followed by "Stranger in a Strange land."

Now many of you are now surprised that I can read more than 2 sentances. Still can't spell though.

Rain Man
05-25-2008, 09:04 AM
True, Ms. Joie. Very true. And, as usual, you raise yet another interesting point. Now that I think of it, a lot of Kindergarten experiences foster later life inclinations.

For example, the "I'm A Little Teapot" dance no doubt contributed to my lifelong fascination with pottery.

FAX


I think my fear of big government comes from my mother reading 1984 as my bedtime story when I was 2.

Joie
05-25-2008, 09:29 AM
I believe I may have just discerned the origin of my arachnophobia minimus. Thank you, Mr. FAX and Joie.

You're very welcome. I suggest you discuss this with your therapist ASAP....before water fountains are as ruined for you as spiders are.

Adept Havelock
05-25-2008, 09:34 AM
I think my fear of big government comes from my mother reading 1984 as my bedtime story when I was 2.

"Mommy, I don't wanna go to the Two minute hate!"

"Be quiet, or I'll send you back to Room 101 without any dessert! Now be a good boy and sing with me. Under the spreading Chestnut Tree..."

You're very welcome. I suggest you discuss this with your therapist ASAP....before water fountains are as ruined for you as spiders are.

LMAO

crispystl420
05-25-2008, 11:08 AM
Yeah, awesome book. Mind-blowing, even for the jaded WWII buff. Were you in the group that was discussing it a couple of years back on this board?

Yes I was. In fact you're the one who recommended the book to me in the first place. Thanks. It has become one of my favorites. I've read it probably four times in the last couple of years(and I hardly ever read books twice)