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tooge
07-08-2008, 02:46 PM
what forms of improper English bother you the most? Mine are
1. We seen/ I seen (frequently used by Redrum) as opposed to We saw/I saw
2. We was as opposed to we were...
3. I would rather see this THEN that, as opposed to THAN....
Others?

rambleonthruthefog
07-08-2008, 02:48 PM
What u be talkin' of?

RedNeckRaider
07-08-2008, 02:49 PM
Say what? huh what ya talkin bout?

Dicky McElephant
07-08-2008, 02:49 PM
I hate when people use loose when they mean lose and lose when they mean loose.

Sure-Oz
07-08-2008, 02:49 PM
My gf gets on me about "that don't matter" when it should be "that doesn't matter"

CupidStunt
07-08-2008, 02:56 PM
Either "your" and "you're" or "it's" and "its."

tyton75
07-08-2008, 02:56 PM
people who say Supposeably should be shot

and those that say Irregardless should have their ballz ripped off thru their anus


Those 2 things are just like nails on a chalkboard to me and I'm not even sure why it bothers me so much

Donger
07-08-2008, 02:59 PM
Et cetera as "excetra." Of course, that's Latin.

tooge
07-08-2008, 02:59 PM
people who say Supposeably should be shot

and those that say Irregardless should have their ballz ripped off thru their anus


Those 2 things are just like nails on a chalkboard to me and I'm not even sure why it bothers me so much

I sure hope I dont ever actually slip and say one of those around you man, god that sounds painful

Baconeater
07-08-2008, 03:00 PM
I hate when people use loose when they mean lose and lose when they mean loose.
ur a looser

Sully
07-08-2008, 03:00 PM
When I hear people say, "Same difference,: it makes me want to punch babies.

Adept Havelock
07-08-2008, 03:03 PM
Can I "axe" you something? :banghead:

SPATCH
07-08-2008, 03:04 PM
there/their/they're

are/our

and CHEIFS

SPATCH
07-08-2008, 03:05 PM
there/their/they're

are/our

and Chiefs

wow. it won't let you misspell chiefs

RedNeckRaider
07-08-2008, 03:09 PM
Can I "axe" you something? :banghead:

Or people that use slang for every word but aunt :spock:

Skip Towne
07-08-2008, 03:10 PM
Your and idiot.

2bikemike
07-08-2008, 03:11 PM
I am guilty of the double negatives. My wife is always calling me on it.
She also hates when I say something like " I'm going to get me a sandwich you want one?"

RedNeckRaider
07-08-2008, 03:12 PM
Your and idiot.

LMAO

2bikemike
07-08-2008, 03:13 PM
Can I "axe" you something? :banghead:

I work with a guy who loves his Brefkast in the morning. But he never axes me if I want brefkast.

FAX
07-08-2008, 03:13 PM
Or, when somebody uses the term "potentiality" when, what they really mean is, "conceivability". Bastards.

FAX

BigMeatballDave
07-08-2008, 03:15 PM
Should of :banghead:
Should have o:-)

Braincase
07-08-2008, 03:16 PM
My bad.

seclark
07-08-2008, 03:19 PM
when someone says, "i got th'runnin drip"
instead of saying, "i got th'syphilis"
sec

Demonpenz
07-08-2008, 03:23 PM
this thread is ironic.

BigVE
07-08-2008, 03:27 PM
people who say Supposeably should be shot

and those that say Irregardless should have their ballz ripped off thru their anus


Those 2 things are just like nails on a chalkboard to me and I'm not even sure why it bothers me so much

...says the man who can't use punctuation. Don't hate, educate. FYI...
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/irregardless

2bikemike
07-08-2008, 03:28 PM
I was reading this thread to my wife and she wants me to throw in Laxadaisical.

FAX
07-08-2008, 03:28 PM
when someone says, "i got th'runnin drip"
instead of saying, "i got th'syphilis"
sec

Yeah. That's pretty troubling, right there.

FAX

SPATCH
07-08-2008, 03:29 PM
...says the man who can't use punctuation. Don't hate, educate. FYI...
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/irregardless

i was wondering what his qualms with the word "irregardless" were

SPATCH
07-08-2008, 03:31 PM
I was reading this thread to my wife and she wants me to throw in Laxadaisical.

can you be more pacific?

FAX
07-08-2008, 03:33 PM
...says the man who can't use punctuation. Don't hate, educate. FYI...
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/irregardless

So, basically, disregardlessness?

FAX

markk
07-08-2008, 03:34 PM
to/too/two
you're/your
there/they're/their

Stewie
07-08-2008, 03:37 PM
Myself instead of me.

"Come see Joe or myself..."

Drives me nuts.

Adept Havelock
07-08-2008, 03:39 PM
I also have a loathing for people who say, or type, hahahaha.

It brings back unpleasant memories of Max Headroom.

Dicky McElephant
07-08-2008, 03:40 PM
ur a looser

I'm not lose!

FAX
07-08-2008, 03:41 PM
I agree with the "hahaha" thing. That's why I use "LOLROROLOROL".

But what really burns my toast is when somebody says, "We're simplifying the offense" when they really mean, "I don't have a clue what the hell I'm doing."

FAX

Adept Havelock
07-08-2008, 03:44 PM
But what really burns my toast is when somebody says, "We're simplifying the offense" when they really mean, "I don't have a clue what the hell I'm doing."

FAX

Agreed. It also disturbs me when someone says “He was the highest rated guy on our board — without any question." when they mean, "I think I can browbeat his agent and sign him cheap, even though we have three guys at that position already".

88TG88
07-08-2008, 03:44 PM
people who say Supposeably should be shot

and those that say Irregardless should have their ballz ripped off thru their anus



Et cetera as "excetra." Of course, that's Latin.

When I hear people say, "Same difference,: it makes me want to punch babies.
All those phrases make me want to kill

Skip Towne
07-08-2008, 03:45 PM
I agree with the "hahaha" thing. That's why I use "LOLROROLOROL".

But what really burns my toast is when somebody says, "We're simplifying the offense" when they really mean, "I don't have a clue what the hell I'm doing."

FAX

Maybe he's just simplifying it down to where he can understand it.

Adept Havelock
07-08-2008, 03:46 PM
Me fail English? That's unpossible. [/R. Wiggum]

blueballs
07-08-2008, 03:56 PM
going to hospital
the English are strange

Stryker
07-08-2008, 04:24 PM
Pulling up to the pickup window and the fast food drive-thru attendant says "Here go ya ordea" or "Here ya ordea go"

I'm like WTF did you just say?

Stewie
07-08-2008, 04:32 PM
Pulling up to the pickup window and the fast food drive-thru attendant says "Here go ya ordea" or "Here ya ordea go"

I'm like WTF did you just say?

And they wonder why their job is shoving food through a window.

DJay23
07-08-2008, 04:42 PM
One that's Chiefs related is when people spell Tony GonzaleZ, Tony GonzaleS. Look at the back of his ****ing jersey.

SPATCH
07-08-2008, 04:46 PM
i ****ing hate it when people say "deal" or "dealie"...

dumbass: "hey, can you had me that deal over there."

me: "wait. what?"

dumbass: "that dealie."

me: [shoves finger through eyeball and twirls it around]

FAX
07-08-2008, 05:07 PM
I would like to take this opportunity to invite all the posters who use these strange words to join our fantastic, awesome, special social group we call, "Peeple Who Cant Spel Gud: We, the peeple who cant spel gud beleeve in the write to post anyhow. If yu cant spel gud and want too be part of this groop its okay."

I don't know how you access this group, or how you join, but you are more than welcome. We have lots of members, but we can always use more. We will teach you the special handshake and next week's program is entitled, "I before E, except after C."

FAX

acesn8s
07-08-2008, 05:09 PM
Can I "axe" you something? :banghead:Reminds me of an O.J. joke.

acesn8s
07-08-2008, 05:15 PM
I would like to take this opportunity to invite all the posters who use these strange words to join our fantastic, awesome, special social group we call, "Peeple Who Cant Spel Gud: We, the peeple who cant spel gud beleeve in the write to post anyhow. If yu cant spel gud and want too be part of this groop its okay."

I don't know how you access this group, or how you join, but you are more than welcome. We have lots of members, but we can always use more. We will teach you the special handshake and next week's program is entitled, "I before E, except after C."

FAXYou just need to sign up on ChiefsPlanet.com.

Skip Towne
07-08-2008, 05:20 PM
One that's Chiefs related is when people spell Tony GonzaleZ, Tony GonzaleS. Look at the back of his ****ing jersey.

I tried that but he won't hold still.

Simply Red
07-08-2008, 05:23 PM
"me and my wife"

Fuggin irritates me to the point of tazing a wigga!

brorth
07-08-2008, 05:36 PM
The Apostrophe
Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab

The apostrophe has three uses:
1) to form possessives of nouns
2) to show the omission of letters
3) to indicate certain plurals of lowercase letters.

Apostrophes are NOT used for possessive pronouns or for noun plurals, including acronyms.
Forming possessives of nouns
To see if you need to make a possessive, turn the phrase around and make it an "of the..." phrase. For example:
the boy's hat = the hat of the boy
three days' journey = journey of three days
If the noun after "of" is a building, an object, or a piece of furniture, then no apostrophe is needed!
room of the hotel = hotel room
door of the car = car door
leg of the table = table leg
Once you've determined whether you need to make a possessive, follow these rules to create one.
• add 's to the singular form of the word (even if it ends in -s):
the owner's car
James's hat
• add 's to the plural forms that do not end in -s:
the children's game
the geese's honking
• add ' to the end of plural nouns that end in -s:
houses' roofs
three friends' letters
• add 's to the end of compound words:
my brother-in-law's money
• add 's to the last noun to show joint possession of an object:
Todd and Anne's apartment
Showing omission of letters
Apostrophes are used in contractions. A contraction is a word (or set of numbers) in which one or more letters (or numbers) have been omitted. The apostrophe shows this omission. Contractions are common in speaking and in informal writing. To use an apostrophe to create a contraction, place an apostrophe where the omitted letter(s) would go. Here are some examples:
don't = do not
I'm = I am
he'll = he will
who's = who is
shouldn't = should not
didn't = did not
could've= could have (NOT "could of"!)
'60 = 1960
Forming plurals of lowercase letters
Apostrophes are used to form plurals of letters that appear in lowercase; here the rule appears to be more typographical than grammatical, e.g. "three ps" versus "three p's." To form the plural of a lowercase letter, place 's after the letter. There is no need for apostrophes indicating a plural on capitalized letters, numbers, and symbols (though keep in mind that some editors, teachers, and professors still prefer them). Here are some examples:
p's and q's = a phrase indicating politeness, possibly from "mind your pleases and thank yous"?
Nita's mother constantly stressed minding one's p's and q's.
three Macintosh G4s = three of the Macintosh model G4
There are two G4s currently used in the writing classrom.
many &s = many ampersands
That printed page has too many &s on it.
the 1960s = the years in decade from 1960 to 1969
The 1960s were a time of great social unrest.
Don't use apostrophes for possessive pronouns or for noun plurals.
Apostrophes should not be used with possessive pronouns because possessive pronouns already show possession -- they don't need an apostrophe. His, her, its, my, yours, ours are all possessive pronouns. Here are some examples:
wrong: his' book
correct: his book
wrong: The group made it's decision.
correct: The group made its decision.
(Note: Its and it's are not the same thing. It's is a contraction for "it is" and its is a possesive pronoun meaning "belonging to it." It's raining out= it is raining out. A simple way to remember this rule is the fact that you don't use an apostrophe for the possesives his or hers, so don't do it with its!)
wrong: a friend of yours'
correct: a friend of yours
wrong: She waited for three hours' to get her ticket.
correct: She waited for three hours to get her ticket.

KCChiefsMan
07-08-2008, 05:49 PM
Yo, what up homie? I speak straight G baby, you motha****as needs to check this $hit out yo and you'll bees spittin like a playa in no time

Bearcat
07-08-2008, 05:53 PM
I'm used to most of it.... your/you're used to bug me, but there are no so many people that don't know the difference I think "you're" will be phased out within a generation or two.

What really annoys me is the extreme messaging. An example from a friend's wall...

heyy how r u? hope u k - am fine - i just spoken 2 mal just now that she had seen the film of bollywood calledJodhaa Akbar wit her friends as i didnt went cos i gt plan 2day. n she sed it is really good n wnt 2 c it again - so i told her that i will be available from 2moro night as i am going 2 zee carnival at noon. n we will like u come wiv us 2 watch Jodhaa Akbar if u can - plz let us know. tc X

Jesus f***ing Christ on a stick, what the hell? This is way beyond the excuse of wanting to type fewer letters or of being on a cell phone. If it wasn't for the punctuation, you couldn't even crack it with a kcnut/tommykat decoder ring.

Jawshco
07-08-2008, 05:56 PM
To be honest, I really don't care anymore. English is a living language. If enough people use grammar incorrectly for a long enough amount of time it will become correct by default. A lot of the words that we use in English were created by Shakespeare, and the reason he spelled them the way they are was because he liked the way they looked. The creation of language is sometimes so random and arbitrary that there more exceptions to the "rules" than there are rules.

I'm not advocating that there should be a world without grammar, but some things in our language are just stupid. Why so many silent letters? Why do we even have the letter "c" when it has no sound of it's own (it borrows form "k" and "s")? We should make "c" adopt the sound of the "ch" dipthong. That would give it some value. And while we're at it, make new letters for all the other annoying dipthongs: "sh", "th", "gh", and "ph"; or at least eliminate the redundant ones.

Most of the faux pas have already been mentioned here, like the apostrophes and homonyms. My favorite error to make is the misuse of prepositions. I have friend that cringes everytime I ask him, "Where's your prepositions at?" LOL!

ChiefsFan4Life
07-08-2008, 05:58 PM
People who say "drownding" and "warshed" make me want to kill

SNR
07-08-2008, 05:58 PM
Everybody should know the difference between an adverb and an adjective.

"The Chiefs did bad." Everytime somebody says this I correct them like an asshole. But I don't even care.

or the usual "I did good"

Skip Towne
07-08-2008, 06:40 PM
To be honest, I really don't care anymore. English is a living language. If enough people use grammar incorrectly for a long enough amount of time it will become correct by default. A lot of the words that we use in English were created by Shakespeare, and the reason he spelled them the way they are was because he liked the way they looked. The creation of language is sometimes so random and arbitrary that there more exceptions to the "rules" than there are rules.

I'm not advocating that there should be a world without grammar, but some things in our language are just stupid. Why so many silent letters? Why do we even have the letter "c" when it has no sound of it's own (it borrows form "k" and "s")? We should make "c" adopt the sound of the "ch" dipthong. That would give it some value. And while we're at it, make new letters for all the other annoying dipthongs: "sh", "th", "gh", and "ph"; or at least eliminate the redundant ones.

Most of the faux pas have already been mentioned here, like the apostrophes and homonyms. My favorite error to make is the misuse of prepositions. I have friend that cringes everytime I ask him, "Where's your prepositions at?" LOL!

Never use a preposition to end a sentence with.

kstater
07-08-2008, 06:47 PM
what forms of improper English bother you the most? Mine are
1. We seen/ I seen (frequently used by Redrum) as opposed to We saw/I saw
2. We was as opposed to we were...
3. I would rather see this THEN that, as opposed to THAN....
Others?

Wow, almost 60 responses and no-one noticed the OP's improper grammar in the very first word.

luv
07-08-2008, 06:50 PM
Jesus f***ing Christ on a stick, what the hell? This is way beyond the excuse of wanting to type fewer letters or of being on a cell phone. If it wasn't for the punctuation, you couldn't even crack it with a kcnut/tommykat decoder ring.

I even spell out words like to (2), your or you're (ur), you (u), for (4), etc. The only time I use "text talk" in my texts is when I run out of room and want the whole thing to send as one message.

One I hate for the internet is kewl instead of cool. If you don't talk like a valley girl in real life, don't type like one.

alanm
07-08-2008, 06:52 PM
All of you guys should be teaching English in middle school.

luv
07-08-2008, 06:53 PM
All of you guys should be teaching English in middle school.

I'd be an awesome English teacher.

Mizzou_8541
07-08-2008, 07:06 PM
should "of" vs. should have or
would "of" vs. would have

Mizzou_8541
07-08-2008, 07:07 PM
oh, and their vs. there

Mizzou_8541
07-08-2008, 07:10 PM
People who say "drownding" and "warshed" make me want to kill

what about "prolly" and "nucular"?

luv
07-08-2008, 07:10 PM
should "of" vs. should have or
would "of" vs. would have

That gets me, too. People are so used to saying "should've" that, whenever they spell it out, they write it as it sounds --should of.

SPATCH
07-09-2008, 12:24 AM
what about "prolly" and "nucular"?

ROFL that's a George W. trademark

Guru
07-09-2008, 12:34 AM
Can I "axe" you something? :banghead:

That one drives me nuts.

J Diddy
07-09-2008, 12:37 AM
That one drives me nuts.

you better go axe sombuddy

Jenson71
07-09-2008, 12:52 AM
A lady I work with screws up her "anys/nos" or some crazy stuff like that.

For example:

"We don't have no more of that."

should be, of course:

"We don't have anymore of that."

She sounds so backass retarded. I'm going to say something one of these days.

Pablo
07-09-2008, 12:58 AM
I hate it when people call gaming controllers, paddles.

In South Missouri apparently a cooler is an ice-chest.

Logical
07-09-2008, 01:02 AM
Wow, almost 60 responses and no-one noticed the OP's improper grammar in the very first word.HAHA yup should have used Which.

Logical
07-09-2008, 01:06 AM
I am most annoyed by things that have evidently over the years become acceptable English, but would have got me a nice big red mark when I was a youngster.

Guru
07-09-2008, 01:14 AM
I hate it when people call gaming controllers, paddles.

In South Missouri apparently a cooler is an ice-chest.

Where do they call them that?

Oh, and soda. It's pop damnit. heh

I know, I know. It's a region thing.

J Diddy
07-09-2008, 01:19 AM
I am most annoyed by things that have evidently over the years become acceptable English, but would have got me a nice big red mark when I was a youngster.


this is too easy to make fun of, grampa

J Diddy
07-09-2008, 01:20 AM
Where do they call them that?

Oh, and soda. It's pop damnit. heh

I know, I know. It's a region thing.

there's some kind of promotion at the Kum and go gas stations about pop versus soda

it's a hoot

Guru
07-09-2008, 01:26 AM
there's some kind of promotion at the Kum and go gas stations about pop versus soda

it's a hoot

I still can't believe the store is called that. :doh!:

J Diddy
07-09-2008, 01:31 AM
I still can't believe the store is called that. :doh!:


could make a killing if they change it to cum and go

richpjr
07-09-2008, 01:58 AM
I find it irritating when people don't capitalize the first word of a sentence.

Guru
07-09-2008, 02:00 AM
I find it irritating when people don't capitalize the first word of a sentence.

DRives Gobo nuts when people start a sentence with two capitals too. HEh.:evil:

Logical
07-09-2008, 02:03 AM
this is too easy to make fun of, grampa
I sort of like it now that I am a grampa and proud of it.

Silock
07-09-2008, 03:57 AM
I hate it when people screw up the conditional.

"If I was an idiot" instead of "If I were a smart man."

Fruit Ninja
07-09-2008, 04:08 AM
I fail with a big ass F in this department. I hated hated hated English in school. Math was my favorite though. It wasn't hard for me, i got the hang of it quick. Then again, i never went passed Algebra, but they all say thats pretty much harder then anything up to Calculus. I am sure if i kept at it, i could have done that too. I also didn't mind history or science. I just couldn't ever get the hang of English. I hated writing essays, once i would get to the page, my mind would just go freaking blank. I couldn't think of ANYTHING. I would just freeze up. I have no clue why.

Silock
07-09-2008, 04:17 AM
I fail with a big ass F in this department. I hated hated hated English in school. Math was my favorite though. It wasn't hard for me, i got the hang of it quick. Then again, i never went passed Algebra, but they all say thats pretty much harder then anything up to Calculus. I am sure if i kept at it, i could have done that too. I also didn't mind history or science. I just couldn't ever get the hang of English. I hated writing essays, once i would get to the page, my mind would just go freaking blank. I couldn't think of ANYTHING. I would just freeze up. I have no clue why.

?

:thumb:

Guru
07-09-2008, 04:38 AM
?

:thumb:

:LOL:Just cruel.

Sully
07-09-2008, 06:57 AM
"For all intense and purposes..."

ugh

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 07:03 AM
I still can't believe the store is called that. :doh!:

Really. I wonder what retard came up with that.

HonestChieffan
07-09-2008, 07:40 AM
"on accident"

Saying that should be punishable by something like waterboarding.

milkman
07-09-2008, 07:50 AM
The Apostrophe
Brought to you by the Purdue University Online Writing Lab

The apostrophe has three uses:
1) to form possessives of nouns
2) to show the omission of letters
3) to indicate certain plurals of lowercase letters.

Apostrophes are NOT used for possessive pronouns or for noun plurals, including acronyms.
Forming possessives of nouns
To see if you need to make a possessive, turn the phrase around and make it an "of the..." phrase. For example:
the boy's hat = the hat of the boy
three days' journey = journey of three days
If the noun after "of" is a building, an object, or a piece of furniture, then no apostrophe is needed!
room of the hotel = hotel room
door of the car = car door
leg of the table = table leg
Once you've determined whether you need to make a possessive, follow these rules to create one.
• add 's to the singular form of the word (even if it ends in -s):
the owner's car
James's hat
• add 's to the plural forms that do not end in -s:
the children's game
the geese's honking
• add ' to the end of plural nouns that end in -s:
houses' roofs
three friends' letters
• add 's to the end of compound words:
my brother-in-law's money
• add 's to the last noun to show joint possession of an object:
Todd and Anne's apartment
Showing omission of letters
Apostrophes are used in contractions. A contraction is a word (or set of numbers) in which one or more letters (or numbers) have been omitted. The apostrophe shows this omission. Contractions are common in speaking and in informal writing. To use an apostrophe to create a contraction, place an apostrophe where the omitted letter(s) would go. Here are some examples:
don't = do not
I'm = I am
he'll = he will
who's = who is
shouldn't = should not
didn't = did not
could've= could have (NOT "could of"!)
'60 = 1960
Forming plurals of lowercase letters
Apostrophes are used to form plurals of letters that appear in lowercase; here the rule appears to be more typographical than grammatical, e.g. "three ps" versus "three p's." To form the plural of a lowercase letter, place 's after the letter. There is no need for apostrophes indicating a plural on capitalized letters, numbers, and symbols (though keep in mind that some editors, teachers, and professors still prefer them). Here are some examples:
p's and q's = a phrase indicating politeness, possibly from "mind your pleases and thank yous"?
Nita's mother constantly stressed minding one's p's and q's.
three Macintosh G4s = three of the Macintosh model G4
There are two G4s currently used in the writing classrom.
many &s = many ampersands
That printed page has too many &s on it.
the 1960s = the years in decade from 1960 to 1969
The 1960s were a time of great social unrest.
Don't use apostrophes for possessive pronouns or for noun plurals.
Apostrophes should not be used with possessive pronouns because possessive pronouns already show possession -- they don't need an apostrophe. His, her, its, my, yours, ours are all possessive pronouns. Here are some examples:
wrong: his' book
correct: his book
wrong: The group made it's decision.
correct: The group made its decision.
(Note: Its and it's are not the same thing. It's is a contraction for "it is" and its is a possesive pronoun meaning "belonging to it." It's raining out= it is raining out. A simple way to remember this rule is the fact that you don't use an apostrophe for the possesives his or hers, so don't do it with its!)
wrong: a friend of yours'
correct: a friend of yours
wrong: She waited for three hours' to get her ticket.
correct: She waited for three hours to get her ticket.

I ain't readin' allathat.

RedNeckRaider
07-09-2008, 07:58 AM
I ain't readin' allathat.

Done all his learnin in school, real book smart fella.

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 08:05 AM
I ain't readin' allathat.

Me neither. I'm stayin' stoopid.

ExtremeChief
07-09-2008, 08:15 AM
'everwhat' and 'everwhere' instead of whatever and whereever.

When someone is advertising and makes a sign all caps and randomly doesn't capitalize a letter.

Heard a guy yesterday talking about being accused of something he didn't do. He said, "Before you make an acquisition, you should make sure you have all the information."

wutamess
07-09-2008, 08:16 AM
people who say Supposeably should be shot

and those that say Irregardless should have their ballz ripped off thru their anus


Those 2 things are just like nails on a chalkboard to me and I'm not even sure why it bothers me so much

Your mom's should be shot after what she did to demean herself last night.
Irregardless, don't kiss her when you see her.

HonestChieffan
07-09-2008, 08:18 AM
I fail with a big ass F in this department. I hated hated hated English in school. Math was my favorite though. It wasn't hard for me, i got the hang of it quick. Then again, i never went passed Algebra, but they all say thats pretty much harder then anything up to Calculus. I am sure if i kept at it, i could have done that too. I also didn't mind history or science. I just couldn't ever get the hang of English. I hated writing essays, once i would get to the page, my mind would just go freaking blank. I couldn't think of ANYTHING. I would just freeze up. I have no clue why.

Looks like you have gotten over the freeze issue.

kindra68
07-09-2008, 08:24 AM
"Ain't got no" makes me want to scream

tooge
07-09-2008, 08:35 AM
HAHA yup should have used Which.

Nice catch. Now I is gonna have to axe you're ass

RedNeckRaider
07-09-2008, 08:38 AM
Me neither. I'm stayin' stoopid.

way i here it ingnerent can learn stoopid cant

Sully
07-09-2008, 09:18 AM
This isn't poor grammar as much as just stupid decision making, but I'mpretty much tired of all "z"s put in where they don't belong.

"I got skillz."

milkman
07-09-2008, 09:19 AM
This isn't poor grammar as much as just stupid decision making, but I'mpretty much tired of all "z"s put in where they don't belong.

"I got skillz."

I got no problem with that.

Frosty
07-09-2008, 09:50 AM
One that bugs me a little is when people use the phrase "I could care less" when they actually mean the opposite.

luv
07-09-2008, 10:38 AM
One that bugs me a little is when people use the phrase "I could care less" when they actually mean the opposite.

That one gets to me, too.

thurman merman
07-09-2008, 10:51 AM
wow. it won't let you misspell chiefs

what about when people say "chief's," because they think every word that ends in "s" should have an apostrophe in it?

thurman merman
07-09-2008, 10:56 AM
One that's Chiefs related is when people spell Tony GonzaleZ, Tony GonzaleS. Look at the back of his ****ing jersey.

this one gets me too. also, remember when no one in the world could spell "jared allen" for some reason? we had:

jarid allen
jared allin
jaryd allen
jarred allen

and about ten other misspellings i can't remember.

gblowfish
07-09-2008, 10:57 AM
Using Over and Under for quantities.

"We have over 500 members...."

Over and Under is spacial, not quantitative.

"The dog jumped over the fence."

Quantity is "more than and less than."

"We have more than 500 members...."

thurman merman
07-09-2008, 11:05 AM
Using Over and Under for quantities.

"We have over 500 members...."

Over and Under is spacial, not quantitative.

"The dog jumped over the fence."

Quantity is "more than and less than."

"We have more than 500 members...."


i hope there are things that bother you more than that.

KCUnited
07-09-2008, 11:10 AM
Wal-Marts

**** that "s", and **** you too.

Sorry Oklahoma and Texas, but that high pitched "ahight then" kills me.

Jawshco
07-09-2008, 06:04 PM
I'd be an awesome English teacher.

LOL! I actually tried to be an English teacher, and even have a degree in English, however there is one tiny drawback to that- I happen to hate working with kids. :# Also, the political restrictions of what you can and can't do while teaching really suck. Kids feel an inordinate amount of entitlement that allows them to do what they want, and many schools allow all kinds of bad behavior. I feel that if I can't smack some sense into these kids, then I'm probably not well suited for this career.

Then again, who knows? Perhaps, I'll mellow out when I'm older.

Jawshco
07-09-2008, 06:07 PM
"For all intense and purposes..."

ugh

How about, "For all intensive purposes," or "I'm on her becon call,"? Those both make me laugh.

Extra Point
07-09-2008, 06:49 PM
"At the end of the day." Had all season to look at the problems.

"All of a sudden." Had all camp to see who would stand out.

"Then you look and see..." Haven't you been looking and seeing all along?

Why do we need a clock manager, when all you need, at the end of the day, when you look and see, all of a sudden, all you need is a guy, with a rolled up, stapled, group of sheets with plays on them, to step up and down the sideline with optomism and common sense?