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Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:13 PM
So for those of you who don't ever look at me, I wandered away for a while. A sample of vacation photos will follow.

kstater
07-09-2008, 05:16 PM
Don't lie, you spent the whole time creating the new avatar.

Hydrae
07-09-2008, 05:16 PM
I hope you didn't have to sacrifice the cats up there in the woods. How many Ruskies did you take out?

FAX
07-09-2008, 05:16 PM
Nude pictures only, if you please, Mr. Rain Man.

FAX

Adept Havelock
07-09-2008, 05:18 PM
Hail the conquering......errr....

FAX
07-09-2008, 05:19 PM
Is it just me, or over there on the left, does it look like someone is peeing out the window?

FAX

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:19 PM
First off, you know it's a long trip when your airplane has to make a fuel stop partway through. They wouldn't let me off the plane, so here's my only photo of Dakar, Senegal.

I was on the second-longest commercial flight in the world - Washington DC to Johannesburg, South Africa. The flight originates in New York, and the New York-Johannesburg route is the longest flight in the world. It was 17 hours on the schedule going out, and 18 coming back due to differences in winds. About an hour is spent on the ground in Dakar refueling.

Hog Farmer
07-09-2008, 05:21 PM
Why couldn't they refuel in midair like the Air force does.

BIG_DADDY
07-09-2008, 05:23 PM
I got up. I went downtown to look for a job. I hung out in front of the drug store.

Ari Chi3fs
07-09-2008, 05:24 PM
you take the best photos, Rain Man. Is that an expensive camera?

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:24 PM
Another exciting part about the trip was wandering to the bathroom about 12 hours into it and seeing a guy with robes and leather cords chanting next to the emergency exit. I snuck this photo and hope it's not disrespectful to do so, but it was really interesting. Someone else said he was a Hasidic Jew, but I've never seen dress like this. If you look at his arms, he had a long cord wrapped around them. Fortunately, he didn't blow up the plane or anything.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:28 PM
you take the best photos, Rain Man. Is that an expensive camera?

I have a longstanding tradition of breaking my camera on the first day of vacations. In this case, though, my batteries died on the plane on the way there, so this is from my phone. My extra batteries were in my checked bag.

Seriously, I've had 7 overseas vacations, and broke cameras on the first day on two of them, and in the first week on a third.

Hog Farmer
07-09-2008, 05:28 PM
You should have taken him down, you'd be a hero just like Tony Gonzalez.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:31 PM
A random street scene from Durban, South Africa, on my first day. My hotel was apparently in a predominantly African American neighborhood.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:34 PM
Getting ready for a boat tour of Durban's harbor. In a theme to be repeated over and over, my wife and I were the only people on the boat.

Adept Havelock
07-09-2008, 05:37 PM
A random street scene from Durban, South Africa, on my first day. My hotel was apparently in a predominantly African American neighborhood.

Are you sure they weren't South African Americans?

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:38 PM
The pictures will get more interesting, by the way.

Here's the Durban skyline as seen from the boat.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:42 PM
Another sign that you're far from home: one of your sauce options is "monkey gland". Mmmmmm, monkey gland.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:46 PM
Then it's to the car, to head up to Zululand. We stayed at a game lodge near Hluhluwe, which for those of you familiar with Zululand is a little north of Mtubatuba.

Hog Farmer
07-09-2008, 05:49 PM
I wish I had known you were going over there. I have an associate thats been wanting to deposit 87 million dollars in my account.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:50 PM
Our "tented lodge" was rather luxurious...granite bathroom, leather couch, etc. Pretty nice digs.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 05:52 PM
I wish I had known you were going over there. I have an associate thats been wanting to deposit 87 million dollars in my account.

Don't worry; we've been in discussions about that already. I happened to meet him while I was there.

bogey
07-09-2008, 05:54 PM
What was the temperature?

Pestilence
07-09-2008, 05:54 PM
Don't worry; we've been in discussions about that already. I happened to meet him while I was there.

Did he have a fish on his head?

bogey
07-09-2008, 05:55 PM
Our "tented lodge" was rather luxurious...granite bathroom, leather couch, etc. Pretty nice digs.

Who's standing in the doorway?

DaFace
07-09-2008, 05:57 PM
Who are you again?

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:04 PM
Watch out for the lawn mowers, though.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:06 PM
What was the temperature?

Lows in the 50s, highs in the low 70s. It was the depths of winter.

That's my wifey standing in the doorway.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:08 PM
Who are you again?

I am Dr. Livingstone, I presume.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:11 PM
Then it was off in the open-topped Land Rover for several days of game viewing.

First up, a nyala, a type of antelope. Not the greatest picture. These guys were around everywhere.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:25 PM
We went through a grove of trees, and in a little clearing...

DaFace
07-09-2008, 06:28 PM
Man, what a lame vacation. I bet you were missing us in the office the whole time! :)

blueballs
07-09-2008, 06:28 PM
did your dad have a subscription to
National Geographic

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:29 PM
Closeup, minus part of a horn.

Adept Havelock
07-09-2008, 06:31 PM
Then it's to the car, to head up to Zululand. We stayed at a game lodge near Hluhluwe, which for those of you familiar with Zululand is a little north of Mtubatuba.

Sounds very nice. I assume you didn't take the "Rorke's Drift Experience" package?

Usuthu!! Usuthu!!

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:35 PM
They wandered off after a couple of minutes.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:44 PM
A female nyala stares me down. The females look quite different from the males, shown earlier.

pikesome
07-09-2008, 06:46 PM
Sounds very nice. I assume you didn't take the "Rorke's Drift Experience" package?

Usuthu!! Usuthu!!

I'd like to know how many people laughed at this?

LMAO

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:50 PM
Run!

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:52 PM
I'd like to know how many people laughed at this?

LMAO

I looked it up. Does that count?

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 06:55 PM
Did you get any pics of Madagascar hissing cockroaches?

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 06:57 PM
Never mind. It's going around.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 07:00 PM
Did you get any pics of Madagascar hissing cockroaches?

You'll just have to wait and see.

Simply Red
07-09-2008, 07:02 PM
Watch out for the lawn mowers, though.

STUNNING!

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 07:07 PM
The zulu dancers came to perform on the first night. There was no light and lots of movement, so the pictures didn't really turn out.

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 07:15 PM
The zulu dancers came to perform on the first night. There was no light and lots of movement, so the pictures didn't really turn out.

Do the Zulus use Central Standard Time?

TrebMaxx
07-09-2008, 07:16 PM
I find this thread fascinating! I never would have realized that so many African-Americans live in South Africa.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 07:17 PM
Try again on the Zulu picture.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 07:20 PM
I find this thread fascinating! I never would have realized that so many African-Americans live in South Africa.

Yeah, it was surprising. Most of our hotels were in African American neighborhoods. What are the odds of that?

kstater
07-09-2008, 07:20 PM
Yeah, it was surprising. Most of our hotels were in African American neighborhoods. What are the odds of that?

Wouldn't they be called African African's?

Hydrae
07-09-2008, 07:21 PM
Our "tented lodge" was rather luxurious...granite bathroom, leather couch, etc. Pretty nice digs.

Just curious, why do they put a tent over a permanent structure?

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 07:27 PM
Just curious, why do they put a tent over a permanent structure?

Because the thatch leaks when it rains.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 07:45 PM
Life at the swimming hole.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 07:47 PM
Just curious, why do they put a tent over a permanent structure?

My theory was "marketing".

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 07:51 PM
Wouldn't they be called African African's?

I never know what the proper term is.

Simply Red
07-09-2008, 07:53 PM
At any time did you feel threatened? By either a human or animal, while vacationing?

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 07:57 PM
The "Z" guys were relatively common.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:01 PM
At any time did you feel threatened? By either a human or animal, while vacationing?

Only in one situation to be described momentarily, but even that was more imagined than real, I think. For the most part, the animals didn't really pay attention to the land rovers. The only rule was to not get out of the land rover, because then the animals would see you differently.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:05 PM
Birdie birdie.

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 08:08 PM
The "Z" guys were relatively common.

Were those wild zebras?

L.A. Chieffan
07-09-2008, 08:09 PM
First off, you know it's a long trip when your airplane has to make a fuel stop partway through. They wouldn't let me off the plane, so here's my only photo of Dakar, Senegal.

I was on the second-longest commercial flight in the world - Washington DC to Johannesburg, South Africa. The flight originates in New York, and the New York-Johannesburg route is the longest flight in the world. It was 17 hours on the schedule going out, and 18 coming back due to differences in winds. About an hour is spent on the ground in Dakar refueling.

I thought the flight to New Zealand was the longest in the world. Like 20 something hours.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:09 PM
What's that over there in those trees?

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:11 PM
Were those wild zebras?

Yeah, all of these are wild, though the ones near our cabin/tent were pretty used to humans. I wouldn't get close enough to touch those, but we still had a couple of times where they were only about ten feet from us.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:17 PM
I thought the flight to New Zealand was the longest in the world. Like 20 something hours.

Maybe that's the longest nonstop flight. I did the San Francisco to Sydney flight about ten years ago, and it was about 15 hours if I remember right. This one was 18 on the way back, but with a stop at about the halfway point.


Oh, and run! (I like this picture.)

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 08:23 PM
Yeah, all of these are wild, though the ones near our cabin/tent were pretty used to humans. I wouldn't get close enough to touch those, but we still had a couple of times where they were only about ten feet from us.

Zebras are mean as hell. Even the "tame" ones here in the US.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:23 PM
This was a cool bird. Very large, probably about three feet tall.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:27 PM
I liked this picture, which was taken at the boundary of the reserve. The one we visited was small at about 4,500 acres, and the one across the fence was about 30,000 acres. They then connected up to a national park that was huge.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:41 PM
Wart hogs were really fast, so it was hard to get a good picture of one even though we saw a lot.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:44 PM
Wait, here we go.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:49 PM
This was our land rover. It was just me, my wife, and our ranger the first day or so, and then another family joined us. Since they were...interesting..., it made for good peoplewatching along with the animal watching.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 08:53 PM
Recharging the camera batteries was easy. South African to French adaptor, French to American adaptor, then add the two-prong receptacle, and since it was too heavy to stay in the wall, you then use a dairy creamer to balance the whole thing on a chair.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 09:02 PM
Herd of nyala wandering around an abandoned building.

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 09:03 PM
Recharging the camera batteries was easy. South African to French adaptor, French to American adaptor, then add the two-prong receptacle, and since it was too heavy to stay in the wall, you then use a dairy creamer to balance the whole thing on a chair.

Nice "southern engineering".

Simply Red
07-09-2008, 09:05 PM
Herd of nyala wandering around an abandoned building.

BS! That's Adams Dairy Road.

:p

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 09:05 PM
The lodge even had a seldom-used driving range, though you had to be sure to get it over the zebra.

Donger
07-09-2008, 09:07 PM
I keep waiting for the Hilton. Where's the Hilton?

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 09:13 PM
You gotta like these guys. They're way cool to watch.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 09:19 PM
Cape Buffalo about to be carried off by a bird.

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 09:23 PM
Cape Buffalo about to be carried off by a bird.

That is the epitome of optimism.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 09:23 PM
We hit paydirt on the evening of the second day. These guys are really hard to find, and we saw a big one.

Unfortunately, we saw no lions or cheetahs. Our park didn't have them, so we spent one day in a nearby national park where they exist in numbers, but for some reason they were all in hiding. Nonetheless, leopards are much more difficult to see than the other big cats, so it was a victory of sorts.

cdcox
07-09-2008, 09:23 PM
So going to South Africa is like a very expensive trip to the zoo?

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 09:27 PM
Recall that we were in an open land rover. We were like, "Hey, uh, how fast does this thing accelerate if we need it to?"

The rangers hadn't seen this leopard before, and estimated it to be in the 180 to 200 pound range.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 09:29 PM
So going to South Africa is like a very expensive trip to the zoo?

Pretty much. Except you're in the cage.

DaKCMan AP
07-09-2008, 09:30 PM
Another exciting part about the trip was wandering to the bathroom about 12 hours into it and seeing a guy with robes and leather cords chanting next to the emergency exit. I snuck this photo and hope it's not disrespectful to do so, but it was really interesting. Someone else said he was a Hasidic Jew, but I've never seen dress like this. If you look at his arms, he had a long cord wrapped around them. Fortunately, he didn't blow up the plane or anything.

The 'robe' is a Tallis Gadol and the 'cord' is Teffilin and, yes, it's disrespectful to take a photo.

I forgive you.

Simply Red
07-09-2008, 09:31 PM
Recall that we were in an open land rover. We were like, "Hey, uh, how fast does this thing accelerate if we need it to?"

The rangers hadn't seen this leopard before, and estimated it to be in the 180 to 200 pound range.

Awesome! Well told.

DeezNutz
07-09-2008, 09:32 PM
Thanks for sharing your photos, Rain Man. Very cool stuff.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 09:35 PM
This giraffe was about 100 feet from the leopard, and was keeping an eagle eye on it.

Mr. Flopnuts
07-09-2008, 09:37 PM
A random street scene from Durban, South Africa, on my first day. My hotel was apparently in a predominantly African American neighborhood.

Are you sure they weren't South African Americans?

Wouldn't they be called African African's?

I was all ready to lay it down and kstater beat me too it.

Logical
07-09-2008, 09:51 PM
I thought the flight to New Zealand was the longest in the world. Like 20 something hours.I think they all say that, try to keep you from complaining. I think it was 22 hours to Taiwan (bad, bad headwinds)

Logical
07-09-2008, 09:52 PM
Really great trip Kevin, too bad DaFace is now in charge of what used to be your company, via a hostile takeover.

Rain Man
07-09-2008, 10:08 PM
More pictures tomorrow or thereabouts. Tonight, I sleep.

Donger
07-09-2008, 10:14 PM
More pictures tomorrow or thereabouts. Tonight, I sleep.

Rest well, Kin-tan-tee.

DaFace
07-09-2008, 10:17 PM
Really great trip Kevin, too bad DaFace is now in charge of what used to be your company, via a hostile takeover.

Shh...you'll ruin the ambush when he tries to come back!

Skip Towne
07-09-2008, 10:24 PM
More pictures tomorrow or thereabouts. Tonight, I sleep.

Sleep? Disapproved. We want more pics.

wilas101
07-10-2008, 07:11 AM
Another exciting part about the trip was wandering to the bathroom about 12 hours into it and seeing a guy with robes and leather cords chanting next to the emergency exit. I snuck this photo and hope it's not disrespectful to do so, but it was really interesting. Someone else said he was a Hasidic Jew, but I've never seen dress like this. If you look at his arms, he had a long cord wrapped around them. Fortunately, he didn't blow up the plane or anything.



an acidic jew, eh? You should have gotten the poor dude a rolaids or something. Heartburn on a long flight sucks big time.

Frosty
07-10-2008, 08:56 AM
They wouldn't let me off the plane, so here's my only photo of Dakar, Senegal.

Be glad about that. My brother spent a year in Dakar and said it was a real pit.

burt
07-10-2008, 09:29 AM
Great pics Rainman, can't wait for more.

Just to assist you in being proper. The darker africans are callled africans....however the lighter africans are to be referred to as "anglo africans". Hope this helps. All other humans are to be referred to as "tourists".

seclark
07-10-2008, 09:53 AM
cool thread
sec

PastorMikH
07-10-2008, 11:13 AM
Cool trip. Our trip, my dad and I, was kinda similar. Except instead of the long plane ride with fuel stops, it was a truck ride halfway to your house. Instead of cape buffaloes, we saw cows, in place of the leapard it was a badger. The lawn mowers were actually prairie dogs. It was a pasture instead of a refuge. Oh, and instead of shooting photos we were shooting guns. But other than that, it was kinda similar.

:)

Demonpenz
07-10-2008, 11:25 AM
Where's the T rex?

ottawa_chiefs_fan
07-10-2008, 02:03 PM
I wish I had known you were going over there. I have an associate thats been wanting to deposit 87 million dollars in my account.

Best line in recent memory!

rep

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 06:38 PM
Interesting bird of some sort.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 06:45 PM
Another interesting bird of some sort.

bogey
07-10-2008, 06:46 PM
Sweet, you're back.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 06:52 PM
Speaking of birds, there was one kind that would kind of take over a tree with their nests, which were woven from branches. Quite cool.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 06:57 PM
Thundering herd of impala.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:01 PM
It was hard to get a good picture of a monkey because they tended to run pretty quickly. However, we caught one bunch of them in an easygoing mood. These were vervet monkeys. (There were no chimps in our area.)

bogey
07-10-2008, 07:01 PM
Speaking of birds, there was one kind that would kind of take over a tree with their nests, which were woven from branches. Quite cool.

Looks like some are duplex and triplex homes.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:03 PM
Monkey up close.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:07 PM
Since I was there, I went ahead and killed three rhino.

(Actually, they were sleeping.)

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:12 PM
Interesting story. The sleeping rhino were on top of a ridge about 100 or 200 feet above a big valley. While we were watching them, we heard an elephant trumpet, then again and again. It was kind of a panicked sound, and when we looked across the valley we could see a small group of elephants sprinting through the trees, all "screaming". The ranger said it was extremely unusual, so we went across to see if the elephants were okay. Another land rover joined us, and we drove around looking for the elephants. They were in a very dense wooded area, and we managed to see them a little bit.

The picture below is on a high zoom, where we could see one of them in the trees.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:16 PM
Like the monkeys, baboons were hard to photograph because they moved fast. Also, baboons weren't common in our area, so it was a big surprise to run into a troop. I managed to get my camera up in time to get kind of a shot of one of them.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:22 PM
A couple of hours after the elephant sprint, we and the other land rover went back to the same area. They had calmed down, apparently, and wandered out onto the trail. There was a young elephant, and the ranger theorized that the young one had panicked about something and the older ones were chasing her just to stay with her.

The funny thing is that the young one came onto the trail right between the two land rovers. Our ranger decided to back up and give it some room, and started the land rover. The sound spooked the young one and it trumpeted, and boy oh boy one of the older elephants charged out of the trees toward our land rover and was not happy. The ranger kept backing up and the elephant stopped and calmed down. It was probably one of two times when I thought, "Hey, we could have a problem here." This photo is right when the older one was running out, just after the little one got spooked.

bogey
07-10-2008, 07:27 PM
I only dream of this kind of vacation. Congratulations!

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:29 PM
Good hippo shot.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:30 PM
I only dream of this kind of vacation. Congratulations!

I must say, it was way cool. I wasn't quite sure what to expect when we went.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:33 PM
Wildebeest at twilight. I think wildebeests are cool-looking. I may have a better shot later.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:36 PM
Impala fight!

cdcox
07-10-2008, 07:38 PM
Wildebeest at twilight. I think wildebeests are cool-looking. I may have a better shot later.

They have a cool name, too. You think it would be spelled "wildebeast".

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:39 PM
A couple of kudu, which are pretty big creatures. Probably not quite elk-size, but close.

Phobia
07-10-2008, 07:43 PM
How much money did you spend to go see monkeys in Africa?

I saw this earlier today 3 miles from my house.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:50 PM
My other interesting "moment of perceived threat". Recall that we're in this area where we just saw a large leopard, and where there are herds of cape buffalo and hippo and elephants and stuff roaming around.

So we're driving around and it gets dark and the ranger says, "Let's keep driving a little bit and see if we see anything interesting." So we're driving around and not seeing much, and pssssssh! Flat tire.

The ranger is muttering curses about changing the tire in the dark and says, "You guys don't know how lucky you are. I just checked the spare before we left and it was flat, so I had a mechanic put a new spare in."

He jacks up the vehicle, takes off the flat, and gets the spare out. Conk. It turns out that land rovers have five lug nuts, and the game park's new Isuzu vehicle has the same size tire, but with six lug nuts. Guess which spare tire we got.

So the ranger is cursing again, and he gets out his cell phone. We'd seen him use it before to coordinate with another land rover if someone saw something interesting. For example, in the elephant panic he called the other land rover and the two of us met up on a trail to try to find them.

Well, his cell phone wasn't working. So we're sitting in this land rover with a flat and no spare, and no way to communicate with another land rover to pick us up. So we end up bailing out of the land rover and being leopard bait for a half-mile or so in absolute pitch-black night to get to a ranger station so he can get help. I had my cell phone with me as a backup camera, and we used it as a flashlight. It was one of those situations where you think to yourself, "Y'know, it's not unfathomable that I could be eaten by a leopard in the next 20 minutes." Fortunately, there were no leopard attacks, though, and we got to the ranger station and got rescued.

Fish
07-10-2008, 07:51 PM
A couple of kudu, which are pretty big creatures. Probably not quite elk-size, but close.

They look tasty....

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:51 PM
How much money did you spend to go see monkeys in Africa?

I saw this earlier today 3 miles from my house.

Well, sure, but were they vervet monkeys? Mine were vervet monkeys.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 07:58 PM
A couple of Zulu dancers hanging out at the lobby. The cool thing is that some went around topless and the rest just had these little strings of beads up there that didn't cover much. I saw more Zulu nipple this month than in my entire life up to that point, and this wasn't National Geographic Zulu nipple hanging down to the belly button. This was the good kind of Zulu nipple.

And I know it's worthless without pics, but I either never had my camera or was in a situation where taking such a picture would seem gauche.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:06 PM
One day we ventured out of our park and went to Hluhluwe and Umfolozi Parks, which were big parks that had lions and cheetahs. Unfortunately, we didn't see any, but we did see some other cool creatures. Here are a couple of giraffes.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:09 PM
We had to stop for a while because an elephant was standing in the middle of the road.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:13 PM
Why did the elephant cross the road?

To drink from the puddle on the other side.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:16 PM
Close-up of snorkeling elephant.

Phobia
07-10-2008, 08:18 PM
Well, sure, but were they vervet monkeys? Mine were vervet monkeys.

I'll bet there were some vervet monkeys there. This guy owns a monkey sanctuary. He has more than 80 monkeys on his property.

cdcox
07-10-2008, 08:19 PM
I'll bet there were some vervet monkeys there. This guy owns a monkey sanctuary. He has more than 80 monkeys on his property.

Donger?

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:22 PM
Baboon, I think. Either that or a small bigfoot. Pretty sure it's a baboon.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:27 PM
Water buck.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:32 PM
Guinea fowl.

Skip Towne
07-10-2008, 08:35 PM
Great show so far Kevin. We want more.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:36 PM
A pack of African Wild Dogs, which are apparently not commonly seen. These guys saw us and ran, but they ran down the road instead of into the forest. Then we caught up to them and they ran again, down the road again. Then it happened again, and that time they were just like, "Screw it," and laid down.

burt
07-10-2008, 08:37 PM
Guinea fowl.

ten yards and replay the down?

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:43 PM
There were elephants all over the place at the big park. We probably saw close to 100 either up close or at a distance. Here are a couple that were hanging out near the road.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:47 PM
We went from there to St. Lucia, which is a large waterway that connects to the ocean.

I liked this picture, because I took it of the bird, but then you can see a large antelope on the shore.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:51 PM
Swimming is not recommended at St. Lucia.

Skip Towne
07-10-2008, 08:52 PM
Is that bird an Ibis?

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:56 PM
Seriously, don't swim there.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 08:57 PM
Is that bird an Ibis?

I think the guide said it's something like a Goliath egret or Goliath ibis or something. I remember the Goliath part, because she said it was the largest subspecies of its type.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 09:09 PM
In fact, don't even take a small boat there.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 09:12 PM
(Yawn.)

Skip Towne
07-10-2008, 09:16 PM
Great trip!! Did you get to see any ancient ruins or anything like that?

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 09:17 PM
Wait. This might be the Goliath bird.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 09:19 PM
Great trip!! Did you get to see any ancient ruins or anything like that?

Not ancient ones, but the next part of the trip was to Madagascar, so I got to go to Antananarivo and see modern ruins. Those pictures are coming up.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 09:23 PM
Needs some cropping, but I like this bird picture.

DaFace
07-10-2008, 09:46 PM
So should we plan for three hours of pictures at the next staff meeting? :)

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 09:47 PM
I liked this sign.

DaFace
07-10-2008, 09:48 PM
I liked this sign.

Huh. I think I'd rather just let Darwinism take over for people who break the rules.

Rain Man
07-10-2008, 09:49 PM
So should we plan for three hours of pictures at the next staff meeting? :)

No. It'll be much longer than that.

Hey, can you increase my attachment allowance? I'm about out if I don't start deleting pictures from this thread.

DaFace
07-10-2008, 09:50 PM
No. It'll be much longer than that.

Hey, can you increase my attachment allowance? I'm about out if I don't start deleting pictures from this thread.

Heh...give me a few minutes. I'll try and find that setting.

I need to show you how to use imageshack.

DaFace
07-10-2008, 09:56 PM
Got it.

Boon
07-10-2008, 10:09 PM
Great show so far Kevin. We want more.

More Zulu nipple.

Logical
07-10-2008, 10:20 PM
Thank Goodness for digital cameras, how many memory sticks did you have to use.

Impressive photos Kevin, thanks for sharing with us. Hope the kittys survived against those pesky Russians.

Skip Towne
07-10-2008, 10:28 PM
So should we plan for three hours of pictures at the next staff meeting? :)

If you're lucky. Can you imagine what it would be like if Kevin had kids and grandkids?

DaneMcCloud
07-11-2008, 01:23 AM
If you're lucky. Can you imagine what it would be like if Kevin had kids and grandkids?

Amazing pictures and thanks so much for sharing. I'm really looking forward to the Madagascar pics.

PS - my wife and I had our first child in early April. She's taken and uploaded more than 1,600 pictures to date. If we live long enough to have grandkids, there probably won't be a server in the world big enough to accomodate our needs!

Pennywise
07-11-2008, 08:11 AM
Since I was there, I went ahead and killed three rhino.

(Actually, they were sleeping.)

Where is the picture of you poaching the horns with a chainsaw?

That would be really cool...

Deberg_1990
07-11-2008, 08:16 AM
I'm really looking forward to the Madagascar pics.



Heres one:

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:16 PM
Okay, next up, the beach at St. Lucia. The crowd wasn't bad.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:23 PM
Pretty nice surf there. It was much different than other beaches because this one had ... um ... sand ... and water ... and stuff.

I'm not much of a beach guy, to be honest.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:27 PM
Bananas were cheap.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:30 PM
Thank Goodness for digital cameras, how many memory sticks did you have to use.


Y'know, I don't know how big it was, but I bought a new Olympus camera for about $150, and it performed like a champ. I got one tiny memory chip that had capacity for 900+ photos or 45 minutes of video. When I got back, I still had room for 11 more photos.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:35 PM
At this point, it was back to Durban to get ready for (Ricardo Montalbon voice) Madagascar.

On the way, we stopped at Mtubatuba briefly. I really liked saying Mtubatuba.

DeezNutz
07-12-2008, 12:39 PM
Okay, next up, the beach at St. Lucia. The crowd wasn't bad.

That's so disgustingly ugly that I'm not sure why you decided to go there.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:41 PM
I introduced Mtubatuba to the concept of Derrick Johnson, and Mtubatuba introduced me to the concept of the Super Zulu store.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:47 PM
There was lots of milling about on roadsides, with people selling stuff like pineapple or honey combs by showing them to cars driving by. However, there was also lots of standing around. It took us a while to figure it out. Apparently there are lots of "independent" van drivers who go up and down the highway. They'll stop and pick up people on the side of the road if they have room, and charge them for a ride to town. Since they're all independent, the locals have to go stand on the side of the road and wait for one of them to drive by and stop.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:53 PM
Random view of rural South Africa as we drove by.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 12:57 PM
Back in Durban, the wifey mimics our takeoff run to Madagascar while at the "Hall of Palms" in the Durban Botanic Gardens. It was a cool walkway that had one sample of each of a zillion different species of palm trees.

Dartgod
07-12-2008, 01:03 PM
That's so disgustingly ugly that I'm not sure why you decided to go there.

I introduced Mtubatuba to the concept of Derrick Johnson, and Mtubatuba introduced me to the concept of the Super Zulu store.
Wow. How did you know Rain Man was going to post that picture?

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 01:17 PM
We arrived in Antananarivo late on a hopping Saturday night. I got us the best room in the best hotel in town, the Hotel Sakamanga, for 65 Euros a night. It was notably less nice than a Holiday Inn Express in terms of furnishings and stuff, but it was clean and we got a two-room suite with a balcony. Here's our street.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 01:21 PM
Just in case you don't think it's really Madagascar...

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 01:26 PM
We woke up the next morning and I went out to a deck in our hotel room to check out the view...

Left...

Note the cool old French building sticking up in the middle. Antananarivo is a mix of post-nuclear holocaust colonial France, modern hovel, and 7.6 earthquake when it comes to architecture.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 01:31 PM
Center...

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 01:34 PM
Right...

Note the gas station below. For some reason, most of the country looked like it had been abandoned, but the gas stations were beacons of newness and cleanliness.

stumppy
07-12-2008, 01:43 PM
Right...

Note the gas station below. For some reason, most of the country looked like it had been abandoned, but the gas stations were beacons of newness and cleanliness.


Never underestimate the power of a 128 oz slurppy. It has the ability to unite entire nations in the quest for fast gas, enormous beverages, and clean bathrooms.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 01:51 PM
We had breakfast at the hotel, mixing it up with French perverts and also the only American we would see until our last day. I kid you not, it was a professor doing lemur research. Nice guy, so we chatted over breakfast.

On the plane trip to Antananarivo, we got documents explaining that sex tourism was being cracked down on in Madagascar. Apparently, the country is a destination for French men in terms of both prostitution and child prostitution, and sure enough, we saw a fair number of middle-aged French men traveling alone or with Malagasy women.

Apparently, the practice has been aided by old Malagasy customs that promote prostitution. In traditional culture, a Malagasy girl is considered "marriage-eligible" as soon as she hits puberty, and one of two things happened: either she got married, or she could set up her own household and "entertain suitors". A suitor was required to give the father of the girl two zebu (cattle, more or less) in order to "court" the girl. Well, some savvy fathers figured out pretty quick that they could have the girl set up a household and then bring "suitors" to her at two zebu per "date". When the French arrived, they could pretty easily afford two zebu (or cash equivalent) and voila! they got to boink a 13 year-old legally. Apparently, the government decided that that wasn't a good thing, so they were cracking down on it, though we still saw our share of French men with attractive young Malagasy women.

By the way, Malagasy people are a genetic mix of black African, middle eastern, and Indonesian races, so you'd see some who looked like Zulus and stuff (very African skin and features), others who looked Indonesian, and then everything in between.

Here's our street in the daytime.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 01:56 PM
Rain Man hanging out in the 'hood.

Note the old taxis. There were tons of them on the road, and they had to be French colonial vehicles. Most were in pretty good shape for their age, too.

Subterranean Alien
07-12-2008, 01:56 PM
First off, you know it's a long trip when your airplane has to make a fuel stop partway through. They wouldn't let me off the plane, so here's my only photo of Dakar, Senegal.

I was on the second-longest commercial flight in the world - Washington DC to Johannesburg, South Africa. The flight originates in New York, and the New York-Johannesburg route is the longest flight in the world. It was 17 hours on the schedule going out, and 18 coming back due to differences in winds. About an hour is spent on the ground in Dakar refueling.

I love the plane window photo. I do not envy an 18 hour flight. I flew to Ireland last June from Kansas. The flight home was absolutely brutal. The human body isn't conditioned to that much air travel, no matter who you are.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:00 PM
Banana-carrying dude. That's got to be pretty heavy.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:04 PM
I love the plane window photo. I do not envy an 18 hour flight. I flew to Ireland last June from Kansas. The flight home was absolutely brutal. The human body isn't conditioned to that much air travel, no matter who you are.

Yeah, I was really envying the business-class and first-class seats. I did some research and booked early enough to get us some bulkhead seats, though, and that gave us a fair amount of legroom, which helped a lot.

It also helped that they had movies on demand and also some (pretty bad) computer games in the in-seat consoles. I played mahjong for about three hours on the flight back, and was playing chess until I decided that the chess computer was simply incompetent.

stumppy
07-12-2008, 02:05 PM
Banana-carrying dude. That's got to be pretty heavy.


He looks kind of short. I wonder if that is caused by a lifetime of carrying things on your head ?

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:09 PM
They still had their Christmas decorations up, or at least I assume they were Christmas decorations.

At the end of the street, you'll see a park. We went into the park, which was a huge mistake. There were some of the most pathetic homeless people in there I've ever seen, and we were harassed enough that I put the camera away and kept my hands in my pockets for fear of pickpockets or robbery. I don't think I'll soon shed the image of this one homeless little kid wrapped in a tattered blanket, lying on the sidewalk and shaking. It was not a good scene.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:11 PM
He looks kind of short. I wonder if that is caused by a lifetime of carrying things on your head ?

It can't help. Seriously, that's got to be like 75 or 100 pounds of bananas.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:16 PM
The Antananarivo skyline.

The city is probably the most spread-out city I've ever seen. The housing is all built on small steep hills, and in a lot of the parts outside the central city the flat areas between hills are rice paddies (photos later).

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:19 PM
Wandering the streets. Since it was Sunday, it was pretty quiet.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:23 PM
Off the main streets, it was a little more downscale, but with a greater agricultural presence.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:25 PM
I'm not sure what this was. We walked past it and it seemed like I should take a picture of it.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 02:33 PM
This was next to the red thing in the previous picture. I'm not sure what this was, either. The wife was walking over to check it out.

Rain Man
07-12-2008, 03:09 PM
Our initial reaction to Antananarivo was "creepy". It seemed to have a pretty negative and scary vibe that first day. However, we came back a week or so later and were there on a weekday, and it had a much more positive feel to it.

I don't know if it'll work, but I'll try. Here's a three-minute video where I just stuck the camera out the window on our way to the airport. It's an AVI file, which is not on the list of supported files in the "Manage Attachments" menu.

Edit: Not loading, though it's a big file. Let me see if I can upload it to youtube.

Bearcat
07-12-2008, 03:28 PM
Great pictures, thanks for sharing!

The pictures of Antananarivo remind me of the train ride through the poor(er) areas of Rome, or taking a wrong turn in Detroit.

Where does the trip rank on your list of world travels? I assume it ranks pretty high in terms of culture shock, since Denver isn't really known for its wildlife or abundance of African-American communities.

After a couple of trips to London and one to Rome, I've thought about maybe going to Singapore or Tokyo or Hong Kong/China... or maybe Egypt. Hadn't really thought about South Africa though. :hmmm:

Too many places, not enough PTO.

Rain Man
07-13-2008, 01:06 PM
Great pictures, thanks for sharing!

The pictures of Antananarivo remind me of the train ride through the poor(er) areas of Rome, or taking a wrong turn in Detroit.

Where does the trip rank on your list of world travels? I assume it ranks pretty high in terms of culture shock, since Denver isn't really known for its wildlife or abundance of African-American communities.

After a couple of trips to London and one to Rome, I've thought about maybe going to Singapore or Tokyo or Hong Kong/China... or maybe Egypt. Hadn't really thought about South Africa though. :hmmm:

Too many places, not enough PTO.

I went to India in 1989 and that still tops the list of culture shock. In part, that may be because it was my first overseas experience and it was also 20 years ago before India really started making strides, but I still think it would win. Varanasi, India, was the place that I've visited that is the most "foreign" to me. However, Antananarivo may be second on the list. It was out there.

South Africa is so well-developed that I don't even think I would consider it to be culture shock at all. For the most part, it didn't even require adjustment, and English was spoken very widely. Interestingly, too, race kind of disappears in these situations. When 80 percent of the people you see are another race, their race ceases to be an identifying feature and so you really see them as individuals and not necessarily "black" or "white" or whatever.

I went to Egypt in 2001 and would heartily recommend it as a first non-European trip. You'll get hassled by the salespeople, but that's minor compared to the spectacular things to see. Plus, Egypt has a really strong tourism infrastructure, so it's a good initial third-world trip because you get to see the Third World without really having to deal with it too much.

KChiefsQT
07-13-2008, 04:10 PM
Sweet. I've always wanted to go on a Safari!

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 05:12 PM
Okay, I was slammed at work for a while. Here are some more from the next leg.

Heading to the airport in Antananarivo. (Random photo out the window.)

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 05:18 PM
Malagasy dog on Malagasy street. (Still going to the airport.)

Interesting story about the little "Orange" sign and the "Telma" sign on top of the building. Those signs were everywhere, especially the Orange signs. We also saw people with little kiosks on the street and even working out of their cars in the same industry. We think the situation was that a lot of people have cell phones, but they don't have the electricity to charge them. So there's a cottage industry built up around providing charging services for cell phones.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 05:22 PM
The suburbs of Antananarivo. Lots of rice growing in the flat parts and the houses tend to be on hillsides.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 05:25 PM
I liked this picture. I'm not sure what the guys in the flooded rice paddy are doing, but they were definitely working, not playing.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 05:30 PM
Then it was OFF (arms waving to simulate an airplane) to Sainte Marie, a small island off the northwest coast of Madagascar. We stayed at a small french resort that had about 9 huts (16 before the typhoon, and they were in the process of building six of them back).

As a bit of trivia, the African Airlines still provide food service on their airlines and give you good legroom. This flight was less than an hour, and we still got food.

This was the view from our front porch. At high tide, we were about 4 to 8 feet off the water. Off in the distance, you can see the mainland of Madagascar on the horizon. There were no villages or anything that we could see, just jungle and giant carniverous lemurs.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 05:37 PM
This was the view looking left from our hut.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 05:41 PM
This was the view looking right from our hut. There had originally been six over-water huts, but they got blown to the giant carniverous lemurs during the typhoon. They had two of them almost rebuilt and two more in process when we visited.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 05:48 PM
That's our hut, with the blue and yellow lounge chairs.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 06:00 PM
A problem quickly arose. We were expecting "dirt cheap" on the island, but the prices ranged from Denver-level to expensive.

We didn't have enough cash in Ariary to last the week, and we were seriously worried because the typhoon had taken out some lines, so our hotel told us that they could no longer run credit cards. If the bank also had the problem, we were totally hosed and were going to be living on power bars for part of the week. So we had to go to the bank.

On foot.

Six miles.

Each way.

In the rain.

(It actually stopped raining the second day, but we didn't know that, so we walked in the rain.)

The hotel guy told us it was six kilometers, but we think he was a really bad judge of distance. My wife and I are both tall and walk at a reasonable pace, and on our various trips into town it took us a minimum of 1 hour, 27 minutes on a nice day and about 1 hour, 45 minutes in the rain. The road was a bit rugged in spots. The picture shows one of the worse areas, which occurred maybe every quarter mile or half mile.

The funny thing is that we took a taxi back from town one day after we got our money and were feeling good. The taxi took 40 minutes since the road was so bad. At one point we were passed by an old guy riding leisurely on a bicycle.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 06:27 PM
The wife pondering which way to go at an intersection. Okay, the only intersection.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 06:41 PM
Once you got close to town, you had to walk along a pair of bridges that served both vehicle and pedestrian traffic. If you were a pedestrian, you yielded to a vehicle. I was curious what would happen if two vehicles met on a bridge, but never saw it happen.

Rain Man
07-26-2008, 07:08 PM
Walking along the bridge.

cardken
07-27-2008, 07:19 AM
There was lots of milling about on roadsides, with people selling stuff like pineapple or honey combs by showing them to cars driving by. However, there was also lots of standing around. It took us a while to figure it out. Apparently there are lots of "independent" van drivers who go up and down the highway. They'll stop and pick up people on the side of the road if they have room, and charge them for a ride to town. Since they're all independent, the locals have to go stand on the side of the road and wait for one of them to drive by and stop.
Much like Branson.

cardken
07-27-2008, 07:20 AM
Random view of rural South Africa as we drove by.
Looks like Belton, Mo.

cardken
07-27-2008, 07:25 AM
Banana-carrying dude. That's got to be pretty heavy.
Looting? Looks like Katrina- New Orleans, LA

cardken
07-27-2008, 07:28 AM
Yeah, I was really envying the business-class and first-class seats. I did some research and booked early enough to get us some bulkhead seats, though, and that gave us a fair amount of legroom, which helped a lot.

It also helped that they had movies on demand and also some (pretty bad) computer games in the in-seat consoles. I played mahjong for about three hours on the flight back, and was playing chess until I decided that the chess computer was simply incompetent.
(in Computer Voice)Would you like to play a game..?

stumppy
07-27-2008, 11:14 AM
MORE MORE MORE !!!

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:11 PM
Okay, at some point I'll run out of photos. I'm getting close.

At low tide, the natives would all come out and hunt mussels.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:14 PM
We had a lot of excitement one day, because a native brought his cattle down the beach.

Relatively speaking, it was excitement. It was a pretty quiet place.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:18 PM
A nice sunset. We had about seven of them over the course of the week.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:23 PM
Here are the various denominations of money. The westerners used the 10,000 Ariary bills more (roughly $6), which tended to be brand new. The natives tended to use the 100 and 200 Ariary bills (roughly 6 cents and 12 cents), and most of them looked like they'd gone through an industrial blender.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:27 PM
The wilds of Madagascar across the strait.

(Seriously, they really were wilds. It was just jungle over there.)

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:32 PM
We walked to town four times over the course of the trip. "Town" was pretty small, kind of like Dodge City but with Indochinese/African people. This is me on the main street.

cdcox
08-04-2008, 10:35 PM
I got one tiny memory chip that had capacity for 900+ photos or 45 minutes of video. When I got back, I still had room for 11 more photos.

Okay, at some point I'll run out of photos. I'm getting close.



By my count you still owe us around 700 more photos.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:36 PM
Another main street view.

There were some restaurants, and we were almost always the only customers. When we would order, we think they would actually go out and buy the food and kill the chicken. Seriously. When we would order, it would take about 45 minutes to get our food, and it was really fresh. It wouldn't have been that fresh if they didn't go out and get it.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:39 PM
By my count you still owe us around 700 more photos.


I don't think my wife will let me post, um, all of them.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:41 PM
We would pass lots of native huts on our way back and forth to town. These are some of them. An entire family would live in each hut, which were typically maybe 10 x 10 feet with no electricity or plumbing.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:46 PM
This one takes a little imagination.

At night, there were a zillion stars in the sky, and you could see the whole range of the Milky Way. It was gorgeous. Then, on the water in the dark, you could see torches up and down the coastline as the natives hunted shrimp. They would walk knee-deep in the water, slowly swinging their torches back and forth as they hunted. It was one of the most beautiful sights I've ever seen.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:51 PM
Then it was off to the water! We rode out in a small boat with an Italian dude, his two Malagasy assistants, and three Italian tourists.

But what is that disturbance in the water?

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:53 PM
Big splash from the mysterious disturbance.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 10:57 PM
Whale!

We were there at the beginning of the annual migration of the humpback whales, which congregate in the little strait between our island and the mainland.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:02 PM
Since they're there to mate, the humpbacks do a lot of stuff. We didn't see any of them leap out of the water, but we saw some of them flip their tails out of the water. It was really hard to get good photos, because you only had a second when they would flip up.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:04 PM
Closer shot of a tail flipper.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:10 PM
Here's a pair of them running side by side. They would surface, blow a lot of water out their blowhole, flip their tails up and dive, and then they'd resurface a couple of minutes later.

On a side note, our boat was smaller than the whales and didn't have life jackets. I was kind of hoping that the whales could see well enough to not surface under the boat.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:14 PM
This guy was doing barrel rolls. It's a little blurry, but that's his front fin and his back fin as he starts to roll onto his back.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:23 PM
An interesting bit of trivia: whales leave tracks.

When they surface and then dive, their tails somehow takes the waves out of the water, leaving a big flat area of water that has no movement. As they dive and surface, they leave a trail of circles of this amazingly flat water, big circles standing out against the waves at relatively regular distances. This is one of them up close.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:28 PM
On our fifth day, we discovered a footprint, meaning that there were other people on the island. I named the native Friday.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:32 PM
Our hotel had lots of organic bug zappers.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:34 PM
Closeup of bug zapper.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:38 PM
The wifey relaxes in the hut before dinner. At night, mosquito netting was de rigueur, so we had to climb in and seal it every night.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:44 PM
90 percent of everything in Madagascar exists only in Madagascar. They have eight times more species of palm trees in Madagascar than there are on the entire continent of Africa.

The rest of these animal pictures are from a zoo-type place that we went to. It was a bit different than an American zoo, because you got a guide, and they let you in the enclosures with the animals.

Here's a gecko that's unique to Madagascar.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:47 PM
How many geckoes do you see in this picture?

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:51 PM
Check out the camouflage on this guy. It was absolutely amazing. This picture shows it pretty well, but in real life, it took us several minutes to notice it.

Rain Man
08-04-2008, 11:56 PM
The zoo guy dude is all like, "Hey, come on into this enclosure", and I was all like, "I don't think I want to." I did, though, and the nine-foot boa constrictors didn't mess with me.

Dave Lane
08-05-2008, 12:01 AM
Sergeant, you're to ride back to Natal. When you see the Bishop tell him, that is, tell his daughter, that I was obliged to remain here with my infantry. Now go. God go with you.

Rain Man
08-05-2008, 12:02 AM
I had no idea that chameleons got that big. This guy was about a foot long, not counting the tail. He was huge.

The guide caught a couple of grasshoppers. He would hold them up about two feet from the chameleon. The chameleon would slowly turn his head and look at the grasshopper, and then ZOT! BLAMMO! It had a tongue that was about two feet long, and it would shoot it out with perfect aim and nail the grasshopper. Pretty impressive. It would move too fast for me to get a picture of it, but I got a great video of it that I'll try to post later.

Rain Man
08-05-2008, 12:09 AM
Check out the color on this one.

Rain Man
08-05-2008, 12:12 AM
This guy is blending in with the dirt and plants.

Rain Man
08-05-2008, 12:18 AM
This lemur really wanted to jump on me for some reason. I learned that if a lemur wants to jump on you, there's not much you can do about it. They're really, really quick.

Rain Man
08-05-2008, 12:21 AM
It turned out that he wanted to jump on me so he could check out (and chew on) the little thingie on the back of my hat. If a lemur wants to chew on your hat, there's not much you can do to stop it.

Rain Man
08-05-2008, 12:25 AM
A big lemur liked the salt on my sweaty arm.

Raiderhater58
08-05-2008, 12:51 AM
very cool pics. Thanks for sharing

Rain Man
08-06-2008, 05:52 PM
Okay, almost done, and then I'll stop bumping this thread.

This is an animal that is righteously cool and knows it.

Check out its hands wrapped around my hand and fingers. No claws, just fingers and nicely shaped little fingernails.

Rain Man
08-06-2008, 05:53 PM
It's pretty big, too.

Rain Man
08-06-2008, 05:59 PM
More mussel collectors, with the mainland of Madagascar in the background and the dog from Little Rascals nearby.

This dog was always running around, and was way cool. His face was exactly half black and half white, separated down the middle.