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View Full Version : Food and Drink The Day America Died??? Bye-Bye Mrs. American Pie??


petegz28
07-14-2008, 07:04 AM
http://biz.yahoo.com/rb/080713/anheuser_inbev.html?.v=1

InBev agrees to buy Anheuser for $50 billion



WOW!

cadmonkey
07-14-2008, 07:32 AM
USA is slowly being taken over/bankrupt. Sad. I can't wait until Mexico starts to take us over to..........politally not just population wise.

Redrum_69
07-14-2008, 07:44 AM
AWESOME


Maybe now they can make a decent product

Ultra Peanut
07-14-2008, 07:55 AM
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alanm
07-14-2008, 07:56 AM
Does this mean that the Cardinals will move to Belgium and adopt the nickname the Phlegm's? :hmmm:

Otter
07-14-2008, 08:37 AM
The United Arab Emirates now own the Chrysler Building

Abu Dhabi fund snaps up NY's Chrysler Building

14/07/2008 02:23:00

The cash-rich Abu Dhabi Investment Council has bought one of New York's best-known skyscrapers, the Chrysler Building, for a heady 800 million dollars, sources close to the deal said Wednesday.

Despite a sharp downturn in the US housing market in recent years, bidding for landmark New York properties has remained sky-high, showing investors still covet prestigious Manhattan properties.

The deal's price tag means the Middle East fund paid over 10 million dollars for each floor of the iconic 77-story Art Deco skyscraper which is situated in "Midtown" opposite Grand Central station.

Media reports had said the Abu Dhabi Investment Council, an investment fund based in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), had been holding negotiations with a subsidiary of Prudential Financial Inc. over its 75 percent stake in the Chrysler Building.

"We have sold our stake of 75 percent on Tuesday," Prudential spokeswoman Theresa Miller told AFP.

The remaining 25 percent stake in the skyscraper is owned by Tishman Speyer Properties, a privately held New York real estate firm.
"It's certainly a very healthy sign for the commercial real estate market in the US," said Dan Fasulo, a property analyst at Real Capital Analytics.

"Many of the oil-rich nations in the Middle East who (are) just flushed with capital from their oil profit are targeting or looking at our trophy real estate assets," Fasulo said.

The Abu Dhabi Investment Council is intensely secretive about its operations, but investment analysts say it controls over 800 billion dollars of assets and is one of the world's biggest so-called sovereign wealth funds.

Stryker
07-14-2008, 08:38 AM
AWESOME


Maybe now they can make a decent product

I don't know, I think the Bud Light Lime is pretty damn good! ;)

Lonewolf Ed
07-14-2008, 08:39 AM
AWESOME


Maybe now they can make a decent product


If only that was the case... Up until a few years ago, Bud would buy out upstart breweries whose brews started taking little bites out of their market (Rolling Rock for one) but then the bigwigs realized that their flagship brews were losing popularity. They partnered with In Bev to distribute Beck's, Stella Artois, Bass, and many more. Their sales went up again, but this was solely due to the imports. Bud and Bud Light continued their declines. Miller sales are up, too, so Bud was getting squeezed from domestic competition and then Coors and Miller partnered up. The falling American dollar and the rising Euro was the final factor. There was talk of Bud actually distributing bourbon, but I have not heard anything new about that, so it may have been an idea born of desperation.

Bud wanted to buy out Samuel Adams, but Jim Koch is not just in it for the money; he's doing what he loves, making a good product, and the money takes care of itself. So, he said no. Samuel Adams is getting stronger nationally, too. They have a good commercial for their summer brew. Bud will still be Bud, though. So, if you want to take pride in your beer, Samuel Adams is always a good choice.

Otter
07-14-2008, 08:44 AM
Some others as well.

And both Obama and McCain are more than happy to hold open the door for these "investors".

I don't have enough faith in our government to get us out of this or in the majority of its citizens to look past what television wants them to know to vote the right people in office either.

American icons owned abroad: Falling dollar, cheaper U.S. assets spurring trend of foreign ownership

Posted Jul 10th 2008 11:37AM by Carol Vinzant
Filed under: International markets, India, Middle East, Anheuser-Busch Cos (BUD), Unilever ADR (UL), Israel

Imagine this typical American strip mall: a Trader Joe's, a Sunglass Hut, a Caribou Coffee. Maybe there's a restaurant that serves hot dogs with French's mustard, and a choice of Good Humor ice cream or homemade Toll House chocolate chip cookies for dessert. Across the street is a CITGO, Shell and a 7-Eleven.

All this sounds so American. It could -- and does -- exist all across the country. Yet all of these companies and brands are foreign-owned.

Some of these marquee names were always foreign-owned, but overseas firms are increasingly buying up American properties. Most recently, beer drinkers were shocked when Belgian beer juggernaut InBev put the moves on Anheuser-Busch (NYSE: BUD), which is trying to fend off the bid. How could InBev attempt to turn Budweiser into just another of its stable of international brands? We were surprised not only that those European beer snobs even liked our watery brew, but by the apparent ease with which foreigners could try to snap up American icons.

It's not just American brands and companies getting sold. Foreign companies were the buyers in four of the top 13 U.S. commercial real estate deals in 2007, according to Real Estate Alert newsletter. Another foreign acquisition of notable Manhattan real estate was the Dubai-based Jumeirah group's 2006 purchase of the Essex House on Central Park South.


The falling dollar, a decline in stock prices in the U.S. and flow of capital to oil-rich nations in the Middle East has spurred the trend of foreign purchases of U.S. assets, explains merger expert Tom Taulli, who recently dubbed it a euro-vasion.

Read on to learn about more iconic American brands, companies and properties that are currently -- or could soon be -- owned abroad.

Toll House cookies: Nestlé, a Swiss company, is the owner of the Toll House brand of chocolate morsels, baking supplies and cookie dough. But Toll House cookies are an American invention. Ruth Wakefield owned the Toll House Inn outside Whitman, Massachusetts, and baked colonial-inspired desserts. Her big hit was a butter cookie that she flavored with bits of a Nestlé chocolate bar. In the mid-1900s, she and Nestlé struck a bargain. They could use the Toll House name and in return she got a lifetime supply of chocolate. In 1939, Nestlé started selling chocolate in convenient "chip" size for Toll House cookies.

Nestlé SA (NSRGF) started in 1866 with a baby milk formula, then expanded to chocolate in the 1920s. Other iconic American brands it now owns are Stouffer's, Baby Ruth candy bar, Bit-o-Honey, Chunky, Raisinettes, Sno-Caps, Carnation, PowerBar, Ralston-Purina and Gerber.

CITGO: This large oil company, with familiar gas and convenience stores around the country, was started by an American oilman, but is now owned by the government of Venezuela. Henry Doherty started Cities Service Company in 1910 as more of a wholesaler of gas and electricity than an oil company. In 1965 the company started calling itself CITGO. In 1986 Petróleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA), the national oil company of Venezuela, bought half the stock. Then in 1990 it bought the other half. Dueling email campaigns have urged consumers to either buy or boycott CITGO to either protest our dependence on Mideast oil or on Hugo Chavez.

Good Humor: Harry Burt, a Youngstown, Ohio, candy maker, got the idea to put chocolate-coated ice cream on a stick in 1921. He sent neatly dressed Good Humor men to sell the bars from white trucks. Lipton bought Good Humor in 1965. Unilever PLC (NYSE: UL), the British-Dutch conglomerate, had bought Lipton in 1937. Unilever is now the world's biggest ice cream maker. It also owns Ben & Jerry's and Breyers.

French's Mustard: It's not French, it's British. This American brand, created by brothers with the last name French, was invented for the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair, which also brought us the hot dog. But French's mustard was first introduced as a salad topping. During the anti-France fury at the start of the Iraq War, French's made a point of telling the world: "For the record, French's would like to say there is nothing more American than French's Mustard." Except that it's owned by Reckitt Benckiser, a British conglomerate, which also owns Lysol and Woolite.

Frigidaire: An Indiana inventor made the first refrigerator that didn't need ice in 1915, but his company couldn't produce it efficiently. General Motors bought the company and rechristened it Frigidaire. White Consolidated Industries snapped up Frigidaire and other floundering appliance makers in the 1970s. Then Sweden's AB Electrolux bought it in 1986.

Tretorn, Adidas, Puma: Adolph Drassler basically invented sneakers in 1920 and started the Drassler company with his brother, Rudolph. After a fight, Rudolph founded Puma and Adolph renamed the company using his nickname Adi and the first part of his last name. Adidas for a while was under control of the French and Robert Louis-Dreyfus, cousin of Julia. It's now German and owns Reebok. Puma bought Tretorn, the classic preppy shoe, which was originally Swedish.

Plaza Hotel: This National Historic Landmark, where fictional Eloise lived, has passed through many hands over the years, including Hilton's and Trump's. After Donald Trump's divorce from wife Ivana, who was the Plaza's president, Donald sold the hotel for $325 million in 1995 to a partnership between Saudi Prince Al-Walid and Singapore-owned Millennium & Copthorne Hotels. Now it's owned by Israeli billionaire Yitzhak Tshuva's El-AdGroup.

Flatiron Building: Daniel Burnham's 1902 Flatiron Building has been a National Historic Landmark since 1989. Italian real estate investor Valter Mainetti, who likes to collect trophy properties, bought a share of the Flatiron in 2006, then recently brought his share up to 53%.

Chrysler Building: Many New Yorkers consider the Chrysler Building the prettiest in the city. Briefly the world's tallest building, this 1928 Art Deco gem has gargoyles designed for its original tenant, the Chrysler Corporation. Cooper Union, a private college, owns the land and leases it out. In the 1950s Chrysler lost control of the building. TMW, the German arm of an Atlanta fund, bought most of the lease in 2001. Now the Abu Dhabi Investment Council controls 75%.

Caribou Coffee: A Minneapolis couple thought up Caribou Coffee on their honeymoon trip out West. They opened their first shop in 1992. Six years later they sold out to the predecessor of Arcapita, which is backed by the Bahrain-based First Islamic Investment Bank. Arcapita, which conforms to Sharia Law, also owns Church's Chicken.

Trader Joe's: The original Trader Joe was 26-year-old Joe Coulombe, a manager at Rexall Drug, which wanted to get into convenience stores. In the sixties Joe bought the chain from Rexall, changed the name and concentrated on offering affordable, exotic foods with a healthy and environmental bent and tropical décor. German billionaires Karl and Theo Albrecht, who owned ALDI, bought him out in 1979 but kept him as CEO.

7-Eleven: The Southland Ice Company started selling food at off hours to customers in 1927. By 1946 -- long before the concept of 24/7 -- the company changed the store name to 7-Eleven to advertise its long hours. The founder tried to buy out the company but got caught in the market crash of 1987. His largest franchisee, Japan's Ito-Yokado, got equity and now its parent, Seven and I, owns 7-Eleven.

Holiday Inn: A Memphis family driving to D.C. was appalled by local motels, so the father, Kemmons Wilson, already an entrepreneur and builder, vowed to start his own chain. He opened the first Holiday Inn -- named after the Bing Crosby movie -- in 1952. The green neon signs sprang up around the country, luring weary travelers with the promise of consistent quality. He retired 27 years later and then the firm was bought by Brits from Bass (as in the beer), a company that later morphed into InterContinental Hotels Group.

Dial Soap: Armour, the Chicago meatpacking company, sold, canned and used the byproduct tallow to make soap. When they added a germicide in 1948, Armour branded the soap Dial because you could wear it for 24 hours -- or around the dial. The company went through many corporate machinations, was owned by Greyhound for a while, and in 2004 the Dial Corporation was bought by conglomerate Henkel KGaA, based in Dusseldorf, Germany.

Campton Place Hotel, San Francisco: The elegant Campton Place Hotel on San Francisco's Union Square has been a landmark and sanctuary in the city for decades. In 2007 it sold for $58 million -- or $527,000 a room -- to Taj Hotels Resorts and Palaces, a luxury lodging arm of India's Tata Group. Tata also owns another California favorite, Good Earth Tea.

Puget Sound Energy, Seattle? Australian investment bank Macquarie is leading a group that's trying to buy Washington State's Puget Sound Energy for $7.8 billion. Consumers are wary of how much debt the company would have after a leveraged buyout.

Chicago Midway? The Second City's second airport is on the block. Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, a huge fan of privatization, hopes to get billions for a 50-year lease. The FAA has a pilot program for airport privatization that allows five regular airports and one hub to privatize. Midway wants to be the one hub and has made progress getting airline approval. Six groups are competing -- five of them are foreign. The nationalities involved include Spanish, Australian, German, Canadian and French.

Shell: It's hard to imagine a Dutch company called Koninklijke Nederlandsche Petroleum Maatschappij becoming a household name in the U.S., so call it by its nickname: Shell, or the more formal Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A). The Shell nickname comes from a British trading company that specialized in Asian shells in the 1830s, then turned to oil. The Royal Dutch part comes from an oil company started in 1890 and merged with Shell in 1907.

T-Mobile: The one thing consistent in T-Mobile's decade and a half history has been grating TV ads starring first Jamie Lee Curtis, then Catherine Zeta-Jones. What hasn't been consistent is its name or nationality. The company started as Western Wireless, which merged then spun off as VoiceStream Wireless. In 2001 it was bought and rebranded by Deutsche Telekom, the publicly traded remnant of the former state-owned German telephone company.

Firestone: Henry Firestone started the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company in Akron, Ohio, in 1900. The company expanded rapidly across the country and into all kinds of other businesses. In the 1970s the company had to pay the then-largest corporate fine ever after its radial tires were blamed in 34 deaths. The company cut back radically and sold itself to Japan's Bridgestone in 1988.

Sunglass Hut: Optometrist Sanford Ziff opened a kiosk in Dadeland Mall, Miami, in 1971, hoping to sell luxury sunglasses. He sold off part of the business to expand, then cashed out completely after two decades. The company gobbled up rivals and expanded overseas. In 2001 Italian eyewear seller Luxottica Group bought it.

The Indiana Toll Road: Indiana calls itself the "Crossroads of America." The Indiana Toll Road -- otherwise known as part of the cross-continental Route 80 -- links the Midwest to the East Coast. The state of Indiana built the road in 1965, then leased it to a joint venture of Spain's Cintra and Australia's Macquarie for $3.8 billion in 2006 for 75 years. Truckers boycotted for a while and now drivers are complaining about long toll lines. In 2008 the cash toll was raised from $4.65 to $8 to ride the whole 157 miles.

Chicago Skyway: If you keep driving on the Indiana Toll Road towards Chicago, you'll hit the Chicago Skyway, which was leased by the same Australian-Spanish consortium for $1.83 billion for a 99-year lease starting in 2005. The Chicago Tribune reports that when residents feel underserved, they continue to ask what the city did with all the money.

Pennsylvania Turnpike? For the last two years Pennsylvania has been mulling over whether to offer a 75-year lease for its turnpike. If it does, the leading contenders are foreign. The deal has hit a snag because of analysis that shows the highest bid of $12.8 billion from a Spanish company is too low and would likely result in higher tolls and lower infrastructure funding.

Of course Americans, too, are buying up brands and businesses around the world -- as well as strewing brands like McDonald's, Coca-Cola and Walt Disney across the globe. The Commerce Department says foreign direct investment gives jobs to at least five million Americans. Seen in that context, all that money pouring in from abroad is something Americans can feel proud of.

Otter
07-14-2008, 08:45 AM
Bush left the country a ****ing train wreck. who could have seen that coming?

:shrug:

morons

Saulbadguy
07-14-2008, 08:47 AM
Bush left the country a ****ing train wreck. who could have seen that coming?

:shrug:

morons

The majority of the USA population apparently saw it coming...not that it mattered.

markk
07-14-2008, 09:49 AM
who cares? InBev is a publicly traded company just like Anheuser Busch is. The shareholders all over the world own both companies. Ownership just changes from one group to the other and AB shareholders get a tidy payout for it. What's the difference?

I'm sure they aren't going to change the "beer". it's the best selling "beer" in america.

StcChief
07-14-2008, 09:57 AM
Sad Auggie and Gussie Busch are spinning in their graves. Damn kids destroyed their company

Otter
07-14-2008, 10:00 AM
I'm sure they aren't going to change the "beer". it's the best selling "beer" in america.

LMAO

Ok, that part made me laugh.

Where do you think the majority of profits from these businesses go to? Do you think owning one of these billion dollar companies might give you some political leverage on local/state/federal level? Who's interest will they have in mind with this leverage?

Do you think Abu Dhabi cares whether the $100 renovations contracts to the Chrysler Building go to John Smith or Hussien Booligiagi? Or whether a national exhibit crosses it's zoning and will need to be knocked down?

There's a tip of the iceberg for ya.

Demonpenz
07-14-2008, 10:00 AM
The downward spiril of this country continues.

Dartgod
07-14-2008, 10:01 AM
Bush left the country a ****ing train wreck. who could have seen that coming?

:shrug:

morons
Yeah, it's all Bush's fault. :rolleyes:

Our government has been failing us for years, political parties aside. It's all coming to a head now, so the current POTUS is going to take all the heat. Sure, he deserves some of the blame....along with every other corrupt politician out there.

KCUnited
07-14-2008, 10:01 AM
If only that was the case... Up until a few years ago, Bud would buy out upstart breweries whose brews started taking little bites out of their market (Rolling Rock for one) but then the bigwigs realized that their flagship brews were losing popularity. They partnered with In Bev to distribute Beck's, Stella Artois, Bass, and many more. Their sales went up again, but this was solely due to the imports. Bud and Bud Light continued their declines. Miller sales are up, too, so Bud was getting squeezed from domestic competition and then Coors and Miller partnered up. The falling American dollar and the rising Euro was the final factor. There was talk of Bud actually distributing bourbon, but I have not heard anything new about that, so it may have been an idea born of desperation.

Bud wanted to buy out Samuel Adams, but Jim Koch is not just in it for the money; he's doing what he loves, making a good product, and the money takes care of itself. So, he said no. Samuel Adams is getting stronger nationally, too. They have a good commercial for their summer brew. Bud will still be Bud, though. So, if you want to take pride in your beer, Samuel Adams is always a good choice.

I'm normally not a big Sam Adams fan, but I did enjoy their Summer Ale at the tailgate yesterday. I'll definitely get it again.

markk
07-14-2008, 10:05 AM
Where do you think the majority of profits from these businesses go to?

To the shareholders.

blueballs
07-14-2008, 10:06 AM
can i still buy a 30 pack on my credit card

eazyb81
07-14-2008, 10:07 AM
Oh, how horrible! A competent corporation has swooped in to buy AB, a company that has been losing sales for years and has no international presence to speak of! It would have been much better for shareholders and AB employees to keep the status quo until they eventually had to shutdown breweries and continued to lose market value. Yeah America!!!1111

Otter
07-14-2008, 10:14 AM
Yeah, it's all Bush's fault. :rolleyes:

Our government has been failing us for years, political parties aside. It's all coming to a head now, so the current POTUS is going to take all the heat. Sure, he deserves some of the blame....along with every other corrupt politician out there.

EDIT...

Bah, I don't want to get this pushed to candy land. You're correct though, the whole system is ****ed.

Dave Lane
07-14-2008, 10:59 AM
Sad Auggie and Gussie Busch are spinning in their graves. Damn kids destroyed their company

Now if someone would just destroy St Loser :thumb:

Dave

Nzoner
07-14-2008, 11:14 AM
I'm sure they aren't going to change the "beer". it's the best selling "beer" in america.


Maybe KC can get a little love now since Boulevard's product is far superior to any of that swill ever put out by AB

Lonewolf Ed
07-14-2008, 11:34 AM
I'm normally not a big Sam Adams fan, but I did enjoy their Summer Ale at the tailgate yesterday. I'll definitely get it again.

Have you had their black lager? It looks like a stout, but is not nearly as heavy or bitter. I like stouts, too, but the black lager is one of my favorites. I'm also looking forward to their Octoberfest coming back soon.

Lonewolf Ed
07-14-2008, 11:41 AM
Oh, how horrible! A competent corporation has swooped in to buy AB, a company that has been losing sales for years and has no international presence to speak of! It would have been much better for shareholders and AB employees to keep the status quo until they eventually had to shutdown breweries and continued to lose market value. Yeah America!!!1111

Well, to be fair... I did see Bud over in Denmark, right next to MGD. I never saw anyone drink either one, though. I asked the bartender, and he said only young people are drinking Bud. One English guy said he drinks MGD when he wants to keep from getting drunk. On the beer menu, the caption by MGD said, "America's quality beer." Yes, I did protest.

MOhillbilly
07-14-2008, 11:50 AM
What' da ya say John?



:#**** em'!:#

Ari Chi3fs
07-14-2008, 12:09 PM
So, the Tards going to play in InBev Stadium?

JimNasium
07-14-2008, 12:10 PM
The Belgianification of American beer continues.

Bob Dole
07-14-2008, 01:03 PM
Bob Dole is taking a learning French audio tape to his A-B buddy at happy hour tonight.

StcChief
07-14-2008, 01:16 PM
Maybe KC can get a little love now since Boulevard's product is far superior to any of that swill ever put out by AB
I don't drink AB piss water.... even the die-hard St.L townies may convert to something else, especially when the axe falls on people working there.

Give me a BLVD, Sam Adams really any microbrewed ALE any day.

Duck Dog
07-14-2008, 02:00 PM
AB owns 50 percent of the beer market in the U.S. How is that floundering?

It's a sad day.

KurtCobain
07-14-2008, 02:09 PM
**** that

eazyb81
07-14-2008, 02:21 PM
AB owns 50 percent of the beer market in the U.S. How is that floundering?

Go look at the stock price and overall market share over the last few years. AB is losing market share domestically and has been unsuccessful in gaining market share abroad.

Frazod
07-14-2008, 02:34 PM
Go look at the stock price and overall market share over the last few years. AB is losing market share domestically and has been unsuccessful in gaining market share abroad.

Well, I can't imagine this will improve things much. I'm sure Coors and Miller are already firing up their BUY AMERICAN BEER campaigns.

eazyb81
07-14-2008, 02:37 PM
Well, I can't imagine this will improve things much. I'm sure Coors and Miller are already firing up their BUY AMERICAN BEER campaigns.

Huh? Coors and Miller are both part of multinational corporations, hence Molson Coors and SABMiller.

Frazod
07-14-2008, 02:42 PM
Huh? Coors and Miller are both part of multinational corporations, hence Molson Coors and SABMiller.

Didn't know that.

I think all their products are shit anyway. I particularly love the way Coors advertises the temperature of its beer as being the best part of it, which I guess is 100% accurate. Personally, I drink Sam Adams.

It does suck that this company is going over to foreign control, though.

Hydrae
07-14-2008, 02:44 PM
The United Arab Emirates now own the Chrysler Building

Abu Dhabi fund snaps up NY's Chrysler Building

14/07/2008 02:23:00

The cash-rich Abu Dhabi Investment Council has bought one of New York's best-known skyscrapers, the Chrysler Building, for a heady 800 million dollars, sources close to the deal said Wednesday.

Despite a sharp downturn in the US housing market in recent years, bidding for landmark New York properties has remained sky-high, showing investors still covet prestigious Manhattan properties.

The deal's price tag means the Middle East fund paid over 10 million dollars for each floor of the iconic 77-story Art Deco skyscraper which is situated in "Midtown" opposite Grand Central station.

Media reports had said the Abu Dhabi Investment Council, an investment fund based in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), had been holding negotiations with a subsidiary of Prudential Financial Inc. over its 75 percent stake in the Chrysler Building.

"We have sold our stake of 75 percent on Tuesday," Prudential spokeswoman Theresa Miller told AFP.

The remaining 25 percent stake in the skyscraper is owned by Tishman Speyer Properties, a privately held New York real estate firm.
"It's certainly a very healthy sign for the commercial real estate market in the US," said Dan Fasulo, a property analyst at Real Capital Analytics.

"Many of the oil-rich nations in the Middle East who (are) just flushed with capital from their oil profit are targeting or looking at our trophy real estate assets," Fasulo said.

The Abu Dhabi Investment Council is intensely secretive about its operations, but investment analysts say it controls over 800 billion dollars of assets and is one of the world's biggest so-called sovereign wealth funds.

Cool, so foreign nationals who are gaining record amount of money from selling oil to us at massively inflated prices are taking those earnings and buying up America. Cool, glad I could help them buy stuff in my own neighborhood while I try to figure out how to pay for the gas to get to work. Who knows, maybe someday they will hire me with my own money. Then I am sure things will be better. :rolleyes:

beavis
07-14-2008, 03:05 PM
Sweet... maybe they will make their beer not suck anymore.

Pitt Gorilla
07-14-2008, 03:19 PM
I think this sucks. I don't drink a lot of Bud, but I did appreciate the STL ownership. Does anyone recall AB's commercials about AB being American and Miller being foreign? I guess they won't run those anymore.

CrazyPhuD
07-14-2008, 03:37 PM
Heh well this is just payback for us bring McDonalds to their country. What comes around goes around. Globalization is a 2 way street.

StcChief
07-14-2008, 04:08 PM
I think this sucks. I don't drink a lot of Bud, but I did appreciate the STL ownership. Does anyone recall AB's commercials about AB being American and Miller being foreign? I guess they won't run those anymore.
they can run Ad's claiming to be owned by the great beer purists with purity laws from 1500s. vs. South African...

just what we need :rolleyes:

dirk digler
07-14-2008, 04:30 PM
who cares? InBev is a publicly traded company just like Anheuser Busch is. The shareholders all over the world own both companies. Ownership just changes from one group to the other and AB shareholders get a tidy payout for it. What's the difference?

I'm sure they aren't going to change the "beer". it's the best selling "beer" in america.

****ing traitor

Rausch
07-14-2008, 06:46 PM
Bob Dole is taking a learning French audio tape to his A-B buddy at happy hour tonight.

It's sickening.

As much as I spend on beer I think I'll start making sure it goes to an American bidness.

Lonewolf Ed
07-14-2008, 07:30 PM
Didn't know that.

I think all their products are shit anyway. I particularly love the way Coors advertises the temperature of its beer as being the best part of it, which I guess is 100% accurate. Personally, I drink Sam Adams.

It does suck that this company is going over to foreign control, though.

Bud attacked Miller for being partly owned by a South African brewer as if that would somehow make Miller taste worse. Now, Bud has to hope everyone forgets their campaign. They had posters pointing out how they were 100% American owned. I can just imagine Bud sales reps scrambling to all the little dives to get those posters down! LMAO

StcChief
07-14-2008, 09:26 PM
It's sickening.

As much as I spend on beer I think I'll start making sure it goes to an American bidness.
local small batch and micro brews.... really best quality product. Ignore Big Beer and don't support them

little jacob
07-14-2008, 09:30 PM
Bud attacked Miller for being partly owned by a South African brewer as if that would somehow make Miller taste worse. Now, Bud has to hope everyone forgets their campaign. They had posters pointing out how they were 100% American owned. I can just imagine Bud sales reps scrambling to all the little dives to get those posters down! LMAO

the Busch family only owned about 4% of the company anyway.

by comparison Berkshire Hathaway owned/owns about 6 or 7%. So maybe warren buffet was the king of beers.