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View Full Version : Music Neil Young hanging in Doo Daw!


RedNeckRaider
07-16-2008, 11:31 PM
Watching Letterman and seen him talking about it, here is all I can find.

http://www.cleanmpg.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11679

patteeu
07-17-2008, 12:36 AM
A southern man don't need him around anyhow.

blueballs
07-17-2008, 12:38 AM
Is he black

Baconeater
07-17-2008, 12:40 AM
Why is Wichita nicknamed "Doo dah" anyway?

KcMizzou
07-17-2008, 12:41 AM
I love me some Neil Young. "Old Man" makes me think of my dad.

Third Eye
07-17-2008, 01:16 AM
I completely misunderstood this thread title.

Saggysack
07-17-2008, 04:37 AM
Why is Wichita nicknamed "Doo dah" anyway?

I live there and I don't even know. Given the state of this place, it should be Doo Don't, or better yet a more accurate city slogan would be Doo Dryer than MF'er.

chasedude
07-17-2008, 09:12 AM
Didn't he have a song that mentioned a Jack Straw from Wichita??

ct
07-17-2008, 09:33 AM
Why is Wichita nicknamed "Doo dah" anyway?

Lived here my whole life and I wasn't real sure. I've even had it as my where ya at location forever. Gaz used to refer to his hometown of Derby, KS as DooDah Lite, which alway made me chuckle.

I had always thought it was related to the Zip-Iddy-Doo-Dah song, kinda a happy go lucky mindset for a semi small town with a bigger city population. Just did a quick search and found this...


http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4179/is_20010610/ai_n11766022

Wichita's nickname serves as low-key promotion

Topeka Capital-Journal, The, Jun 10, 2001 by Matt Moline Capital-Journal

After a century of reliance on conventional promotional slogans to spark Wichita's image, a California historian assesses the city's enduring "Doo-Dah" nickname heritage as a zany "un-slogan" reaction by young people to old-style boosterism.

By Matt Moline

Special to The Capital-Journal

WICHITA --- For more than a century, Wichita has been blessed by a string of worthy nicknames, beginning with an 1887 promotional slogan, "Peerless Princess of the Plains."

In more modern times, 1928 witnessed the first use of the term, "Aircraft Capital of Kansas," followed by the go-for-broke slogan of the 1940s, "Air Capital of the World."

So what is next for the state's largest city? How about a promotional campaign that is entirely lacking hype, hoopla and hooey? According to Wichita State University alumnus Francis Schruben, generations of hip Wichitans have been doing just that --- referring to the city by the zany nickname, "Doo-Dah."

After months of research, Schruben concluded that the term originated with local college students during the 1920s.

Schruben said he got interested in tracking down the origins of the nickname after reading a column a year ago by Wichita Eagle writer Bob Getz, who attributed the nickname to 1950s-era beat- generation poet Allen Ginsberg.

"It was suggested that the term might first have been used by the late poet-guru," Schruben said. "But 'Doo-Dah' does not appear in his meandering poem, 'Wichita Vortex Sutra.' " On the other hand, Schruben's investigations uncovered only indirect links between the Wichita 'Doo-Dah' and a pair of popular songs --- Johnny Mercer's 1946 title, "Zip-Iddy-Doo-Dah," and Stephen Foster's 1850 tune, "Camptown Races."

"Apparently, the term doo-dah was first used in America in connection with the 'Camptown Races,' " said Schruben, who lives in Canoga Park, Calif. "Then and later, doo-dah meant 'a good time' or 'giddiness,' as a core of meanings. The 'doo' part forms such playful words as 'doo-hickey' and even 'doofus,' which means a foolish or inept person."

The current edition of "The Slang Thesaurus" variously defines doo- dah as a doo-hickey, gizmo, doodad, whatchamacallit, whatnot, whatsit or a you-know-what.

Schruben said he plans to submit his research to the U.S. Board on Georgraphic Names for place-name verification, a step that could make Wichita the only community in the nation to be officially known as "Doo-Dah."

Emporia State University alumnus Cameron McDaniel said his fraternity buddies from Wichita always referred to their hometown as 'Doo-Dah' in the late 1990s.

"Now, I send out notes to people saying, 'Come on down to 'Doo- Dah' --- that's 'Wichita' to the lay person," said McDaniel, who works as a school psychologist in nearby Valley Center.

McDaniel said the nickname makes him think of Mercer's zippy, happy-go-lucky tune, which was written for Walt Disney's movie classic, "Song of the South," a 1946 film adapation of Joel Chandler Harris' Uncle Remus tales.

"When I think of 'Doo-Dah,' it brings a sense of happiness, a spark," McDaniel said. " 'Doo-Dah' seems kind of unordinary and joyful, I don't know, something just sparks."

Demonpenz
07-17-2008, 09:45 AM
I'm going to wichita, far from this opera for evah more

RedNeckRaider
07-17-2008, 09:47 AM
Lived here my whole life and I wasn't real sure. I've even had it as my where ya at location forever. Gaz used to refer to his hometown of Derby, KS as DooDah Lite, which alway made me chuckle.

I had always thought it was related to the Zip-Iddy-Doo-Dah song, kinda a happy go lucky mindset for a semi small town with a bigger city population. Just did a quick search and found this...


http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4179/is_20010610/ai_n11766022

Wichita's nickname serves as low-key promotion

Topeka Capital-Journal, The, Jun 10, 2001 by Matt Moline Capital-Journal

After a century of reliance on conventional promotional slogans to spark Wichita's image, a California historian assesses the city's enduring "Doo-Dah" nickname heritage as a zany "un-slogan" reaction by young people to old-style boosterism.

By Matt Moline

Special to The Capital-Journal

WICHITA --- For more than a century, Wichita has been blessed by a string of worthy nicknames, beginning with an 1887 promotional slogan, "Peerless Princess of the Plains."

In more modern times, 1928 witnessed the first use of the term, "Aircraft Capital of Kansas," followed by the go-for-broke slogan of the 1940s, "Air Capital of the World."

So what is next for the state's largest city? How about a promotional campaign that is entirely lacking hype, hoopla and hooey? According to Wichita State University alumnus Francis Schruben, generations of hip Wichitans have been doing just that --- referring to the city by the zany nickname, "Doo-Dah."

After months of research, Schruben concluded that the term originated with local college students during the 1920s.

Schruben said he got interested in tracking down the origins of the nickname after reading a column a year ago by Wichita Eagle writer Bob Getz, who attributed the nickname to 1950s-era beat- generation poet Allen Ginsberg.

"It was suggested that the term might first have been used by the late poet-guru," Schruben said. "But 'Doo-Dah' does not appear in his meandering poem, 'Wichita Vortex Sutra.' " On the other hand, Schruben's investigations uncovered only indirect links between the Wichita 'Doo-Dah' and a pair of popular songs --- Johnny Mercer's 1946 title, "Zip-Iddy-Doo-Dah," and Stephen Foster's 1850 tune, "Camptown Races."

"Apparently, the term doo-dah was first used in America in connection with the 'Camptown Races,' " said Schruben, who lives in Canoga Park, Calif. "Then and later, doo-dah meant 'a good time' or 'giddiness,' as a core of meanings. The 'doo' part forms such playful words as 'doo-hickey' and even 'doofus,' which means a foolish or inept person."

The current edition of "The Slang Thesaurus" variously defines doo- dah as a doo-hickey, gizmo, doodad, whatchamacallit, whatnot, whatsit or a you-know-what.

Schruben said he plans to submit his research to the U.S. Board on Georgraphic Names for place-name verification, a step that could make Wichita the only community in the nation to be officially known as "Doo-Dah."

Emporia State University alumnus Cameron McDaniel said his fraternity buddies from Wichita always referred to their hometown as 'Doo-Dah' in the late 1990s.

"Now, I send out notes to people saying, 'Come on down to 'Doo- Dah' --- that's 'Wichita' to the lay person," said McDaniel, who works as a school psychologist in nearby Valley Center.

McDaniel said the nickname makes him think of Mercer's zippy, happy-go-lucky tune, which was written for Walt Disney's movie classic, "Song of the South," a 1946 film adapation of Joel Chandler Harris' Uncle Remus tales.

"When I think of 'Doo-Dah,' it brings a sense of happiness, a spark," McDaniel said. " 'Doo-Dah' seems kind of unordinary and joyful, I don't know, something just sparks."

Born and raised there and I never knew, heck I always spelled it Daw :shake:

Mojo Rising
07-17-2008, 11:18 AM
Didn't he have a song that mentioned a Jack Straw from Wichita??

Jack Straw is a Grateful Dead song.

Baconeater
07-17-2008, 12:09 PM
Lived here my whole life and I wasn't real sure. I've even had it as my where ya at location forever. Gaz used to refer to his hometown of Derby, KS as DooDah Lite, which alway made me chuckle.

I had always thought it was related to the Zip-Iddy-Doo-Dah song, kinda a happy go lucky mindset for a semi small town with a bigger city population. Just did a quick search and found this...


http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4179/is_20010610/ai_n11766022

Wichita's nickname serves as low-key promotion

Topeka Capital-Journal, The, Jun 10, 2001 by Matt Moline Capital-Journal

After a century of reliance on conventional promotional slogans to spark Wichita's image, a California historian assesses the city's enduring "Doo-Dah" nickname heritage as a zany "un-slogan" reaction by young people to old-style boosterism.

By Matt Moline

Special to The Capital-Journal

WICHITA --- For more than a century, Wichita has been blessed by a string of worthy nicknames, beginning with an 1887 promotional slogan, "Peerless Princess of the Plains."

In more modern times, 1928 witnessed the first use of the term, "Aircraft Capital of Kansas," followed by the go-for-broke slogan of the 1940s, "Air Capital of the World."

So what is next for the state's largest city? How about a promotional campaign that is entirely lacking hype, hoopla and hooey? According to Wichita State University alumnus Francis Schruben, generations of hip Wichitans have been doing just that --- referring to the city by the zany nickname, "Doo-Dah."

After months of research, Schruben concluded that the term originated with local college students during the 1920s.

Schruben said he got interested in tracking down the origins of the nickname after reading a column a year ago by Wichita Eagle writer Bob Getz, who attributed the nickname to 1950s-era beat- generation poet Allen Ginsberg.

"It was suggested that the term might first have been used by the late poet-guru," Schruben said. "But 'Doo-Dah' does not appear in his meandering poem, 'Wichita Vortex Sutra.' " On the other hand, Schruben's investigations uncovered only indirect links between the Wichita 'Doo-Dah' and a pair of popular songs --- Johnny Mercer's 1946 title, "Zip-Iddy-Doo-Dah," and Stephen Foster's 1850 tune, "Camptown Races."

"Apparently, the term doo-dah was first used in America in connection with the 'Camptown Races,' " said Schruben, who lives in Canoga Park, Calif. "Then and later, doo-dah meant 'a good time' or 'giddiness,' as a core of meanings. The 'doo' part forms such playful words as 'doo-hickey' and even 'doofus,' which means a foolish or inept person."

The current edition of "The Slang Thesaurus" variously defines doo- dah as a doo-hickey, gizmo, doodad, whatchamacallit, whatnot, whatsit or a you-know-what.

Schruben said he plans to submit his research to the U.S. Board on Georgraphic Names for place-name verification, a step that could make Wichita the only community in the nation to be officially known as "Doo-Dah."

Emporia State University alumnus Cameron McDaniel said his fraternity buddies from Wichita always referred to their hometown as 'Doo-Dah' in the late 1990s.

"Now, I send out notes to people saying, 'Come on down to 'Doo- Dah' --- that's 'Wichita' to the lay person," said McDaniel, who works as a school psychologist in nearby Valley Center.

McDaniel said the nickname makes him think of Mercer's zippy, happy-go-lucky tune, which was written for Walt Disney's movie classic, "Song of the South," a 1946 film adapation of Joel Chandler Harris' Uncle Remus tales.

"When I think of 'Doo-Dah,' it brings a sense of happiness, a spark," McDaniel said. " 'Doo-Dah' seems kind of unordinary and joyful, I don't know, something just sparks."

Interesting, that's similar to the "Bugeaters" nickname for Nebraskans, it dates back to the late 1800s and no one is really sure of its origins.

StcChief
07-17-2008, 12:14 PM
A southern man don't need him around anyhow.

but "A Man Needs A Maid"