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KC Kings
07-21-2008, 10:32 AM
At what age do you teach kids to run over a fielder in the base-line, and how do you explain to them how to do it in a sportsmanlike way?

I coached a 8U competitive machine pitch team this past season, and two instances stick out in my mind that I don't want to run into. The first incident, our 1st baseman was barely on the bag and the runner shoved him on his way by. He was either a kid with a 5'6" dad with an little guy complex telling him to do this, or he didn't understand what the coach was teaching him. Either way it was unsportsmanlike and I don't want my boys doing that. The second incident was when we had a runner going from 1st to 2nd and he pulled up to run around the 2nd baseman as the SS was covering the bag and as a result was forced out.

We are playing 9U kid pitch this fall, and it is easy to say "if they are playing competitive, run 'em over", but these are kids just out of 2nd grade. I think that they are ready to learn to run over players in the baseline, but how do you teach them to do that without being a dick?

markk
07-21-2008, 10:34 AM
at all ages. nothing is more important than winning an 8 year old's baseball games.

Dartgod
07-21-2008, 10:40 AM
at all ages. nothing is more important than winning an 8 year old's baseball games.
Also, parents should not hesitate to confront an ump, who made a bad call, in the parking lot after the game. If it was a really bad call, they should take care of business immediately, on the field.

FAX
07-21-2008, 10:47 AM
I began teaching my son this technique during the toddler stage, Mr. KC Kings. Worked like a charm with guests, furniture, and pets. Then, in a real game, when it mattered, and it was all on the line ... nothing.

FAX

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 10:49 AM
Your playing in USSSA rules in the KC area, right?

If so your runner in any way impedes a defensive player your runner is out. Automatically.

If your runner could have avoided contact and doesn't, he automatically out and ejected from the game.

If a runner has to veer out of the baseline because a defensive player was in the baseline and the in the umpires judgement kept him from advancing the runner is awarded the next base.

There is no tolerance for intentional contact in the rules and the unwritten rules between coaches. Too many players have gotten hurt. Last summer I had an opposing player try to bulldog my catcher at home and he broke his leg.

RJ
07-21-2008, 10:50 AM
The problem with teaching your kids that rule is that the kids on the other team might not know the rule. Good chance of an injury occurring if your kids are looking to plow into someone and the other kid doesn't know he's fair game.

Personally, I'd let it go for now. There are more important facets of baseball they can be working on.

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 10:53 AM
Good chance of an injury occurring if your kids are looking to plow into someone and the other kid doesn't know he's fair game.
see post #5.

smittysbar
07-21-2008, 10:56 AM
As BRC stated, it is against the rules

CoMoChief
07-21-2008, 10:58 AM
at all ages. nothing is more important than winning an 8 year old's baseball games.

Exactly. My dad told me how to bulldog a catcher when I was 6.

Then I did it in a game (when it was perfectly necessary as the play was at home) the ump threw me out of the game because of foul play.

markk
07-21-2008, 11:03 AM
Exactly. My dad told me how to bulldog a catcher when I was 6.

Then I did it in a game (when it was perfectly necessary as the play was at home) the ump threw me out of the game because of foul play.

Well, good. There is no place for intentionally inflicting injury, especially not on elementary school age children. Any coach that permits that ought to be banned from coaching.

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 11:06 AM
Exactly. My dad told me how to bulldog a catcher when I was 6.

Then I did it in a game (when it was perfectly necessary as the play was at home) the ump threw me out of the game because of foul play.
You should have ran faster, do a hook slide, or your teammate should have hit it better. Whatever you were dead at the plate. Take it and move on. It is illegal to bulldog at any age except for professionals for a good reason. Kids get hurt needlesly.

Kids need to learn how to win. How to better themselves. How to be a good teammate and sacrifice thier personal wants for the good of the team. But the line you don't cross is taking a chance on hurting a kid to win a little league game.

StcChief
07-21-2008, 11:12 AM
You should have ran faster, do a hook slide, or your teammate should have hit it better. Whatever you were dead at the plate. Take it and move on. It is illegal to bulldog at any age except for professionals for a good reason. Kids get hurt needlesly.

Kids need to learn how to win. How to better themselves. How to be a good teammate and sacrifice thier personal wants for the good of the team. But the line you don't cross is taking a chance on hurting a kid to win a little league game.some guy tried that with me in Rec softball, trouble was
the bullet that came from C fielder I was waiting for him, side stepped and tagged him. (the matador move)

they still threw his A$$ out for unsportsmanlike conduct.

CoMoChief
07-21-2008, 11:13 AM
You should have ran faster, do a hook slide, or your teammate should have hit it better. Whatever you were dead at the plate. Take it and move on. It is illegal to bulldog at any age except for professionals for a good reason. Kids get hurt needlesly.

Kids need to learn how to win. How to better themselves. How to be a good teammate and sacrifice thier personal wants for the good of the team. But the line you don't cross is taking a chance on hurting a kid to win a little league game.

Win at all costs. Nothing else matters.

2nd place is for losers.

smittysbar
07-21-2008, 11:15 AM
Win at all costs. Nothing else matters.

2nd place is for losers.

So how much help were you to your team after being thrown out?

Dartgod
07-21-2008, 11:17 AM
So how much help were you to your team after being thrown out?
A lot when they jumped the ump after the game.

CoMoChief
07-21-2008, 11:17 AM
So how much help were you to your team after being thrown out?

We were blowing them out anyways. There was a 6 run per inning rule and I think there was only one inning where we didn't have to enforce it.

KC Kings
07-21-2008, 11:20 AM
Your playing in USSSA rules in the KC area, right?

If so your runner in any way impedes a defensive player your runner is out. Automatically.

If your runner could have avoided contact and doesn't, he automatically out and ejected from the game.

If a runner has to veer out of the baseline because a defensive player was in the baseline and the in the umpires judgment kept him from advancing the runner is awarded the next base.

There is no tolerance for intentional contact in the rules and the unwritten rules between coaches. Too many players have gotten hurt. Last summer I had an opposing player try to bulldog my catcher at home and he broke his leg.

Great! It isn't surprising that this rule wasn't upheld with most of our umpires being high school age, but I am glad I won't have to deal with this part of the game.

Since we are on the subject of etiquette, I will generally not take advantage of the lack of ability in young players for the sake of winning. When base coaching I will help the defensive players if they need some coaching. Another thing I do it to only send the runners one base on an over throw, and if the ball is in the infield I will hold the runner whether or not they could score. Very few 8U teams have enough players to field the infield that can make perfect throws and catches and rather than telling my fastest players to never stop running and make them get you out, (one team did this and scored 3 in the park homeruns off of routine singles), I try to do the best thing to develop the players.

My next question is with 9U kid pitch regards stealing bases. The wind-up is going to be slow and IF the catcher catches the ball the chances of the 2nd baseman covering the bag and the catcher having the arm to throw it to him are very slim. So stealing bases is going to be like taking candy from a baby. How did you handle this situation? I have read a lot of on-line articles where the coaches tell there base runners that the steal is always ON, unless the 3b coach says otherwise but I don't know what the etiquette is for this situation.

JBucc
07-21-2008, 11:22 AM
Teach him spikes+opponent's face=victory.

RJ
07-21-2008, 11:24 AM
see post #5.



Good, that's as it should be.

Been 20 years since I coached little league, I'm a little rusty on the rules.

Demonpenz
07-21-2008, 11:25 AM
I would say when they start getting paid to play. I know in college world series they talked about breaking up DP's and how they can't take out the SS/2nd base like they can in the pro's.

gblowfish
07-21-2008, 11:26 AM
Don't forget to get your 8 year old all 'roided up first, then teach him how to bulldog a catcher on a play at the plate. Show him video clips of Pete Rose over and over and over....

KC Kings
07-21-2008, 11:29 AM
Win at all costs. Nothing else matters.



I expect my boys to win every game, but for my team winning isn't determined by the final score. For them to win a game they have to play hard, play as a team, and have fun.

When we beat the last place team 10-6 playing the sloppiest defense I have ever seen them play, I was all over them and let them know that I was disappointed. When we played our best game of the season and lost 17-15 in the bottom of the 6th when one of our less developed players was chasing moths in the left field and missed the ball, I took them out for ice cream.

Winning is the cumulative effect of being a good ball player. Parents want their kids to get A's, because the cumulative effect measures how well the process was followed to get there. I want my kids to get straight A's, but I don't want them to cheat on their test or hack the teachers computer to change the grade card to get them. The same thing goes for winning baseball games. I want the team to win because they practiced hard, played hard, and played as team. The win isn't as important as the the steps it took to get there.

RJ
07-21-2008, 11:29 AM
My next question is with 9U kid pitch regards stealing bases. The wind-up is going to be slow and IF the catcher catches the ball the chances of the 2nd baseman covering the bag and the catcher having the arm to throw it to him are very slim. So stealing bases is going to be like taking candy from a baby. How did you handle this situation? I have read a lot of on-line articles where the coaches tell there base runners that the steal is always ON, unless the 3b coach says otherwise but I don't know what the etiquette is for this situation.



At what point can they run? When the ball leaves the pitcher's hand? Also, I assume the USSSA rules prevent the runner from leading off, is that correct?

Chiefnj2
07-21-2008, 11:30 AM
Whatever you do, don't tell them what "suck" means.

markk
07-21-2008, 11:35 AM
We were blowing them out anyways. There was a 6 run per inning rule and I think there was only one inning where we didn't have to enforce it.

you were railroading a catcher with your team ahead in a blowout? you're all class dude.

too bad the other team isn't as lacking in class as you are... shoulda got a pitch in the ear

KC Kings
07-21-2008, 11:39 AM
At what point can they run? When the ball leaves the pitcher's hand? Also, I assume the USSSA rules prevent the runner from leading off, is that correct?

We are playing a Fountain Bluff League so we follow their rules first, then USSSA rules.

Fountain bluff rules state:
Leadoffs and stealing are allowed for 9-14 year olds with the following exception; No stealing home. 9 and 10 year olds cannot run on a dropped 3rd strike. the only way to advance to home from 3rd base is if he is forced in, batted in, or a pick off attempt at any base. He may not advance on a passed ball by the catcher. He may not advance on an overthrow back to the pitcher.

Consistent1
07-21-2008, 11:39 AM
I agree that some coaches teach kids to do silly stuff like the running like crazy stuff mentioned. It also pisses me off when some guys will have the pitcher walk somebody 3-4 times a game because they are the other teams only real threat. It's not like it's Barry Bonds, let them have fun too.

StcChief
07-21-2008, 11:42 AM
I agree that some coaches teach kids to do silly stuff like the running like crazy stuff mentioned. It also pisses me off when some guys will have the pitcher walk somebody 3-4 times a game because they are the other teams only real threat. It's not like it's Barry Bonds, let them have fun too. or just take walks because the other pitcher isn't as consitent (wait out for a walk) SWING THE BAT

Jewish Rabbi
07-21-2008, 11:42 AM
My next question is with 9U kid pitch regards stealing bases. The wind-up is going to be slow and IF the catcher catches the ball the chances of the 2nd baseman covering the bag and the catcher having the arm to throw it to him are very slim. So stealing bases is going to be like taking candy from a baby. How did you handle this situation? I have read a lot of on-line articles where the coaches tell there base runners that the steal is always ON, unless the 3b coach says otherwise but I don't know what the etiquette is for this situation.

I don't know about your league, but in mine the rule always was you couldn't leave the base until the ball crossed the plate until it was the 7th-8th grade level. That said, everyone still stole every base every chance they got. I'd wait to see what the other teams do, if they steal all the time, go ahead.

Consistent1
07-21-2008, 11:45 AM
or just take walks because the other pitcher isn't as consitent (wait out for a walk) SWING THE BAT

That is true also. You don't want kids swinging at crap either, but there is a line.

Dartgod
07-21-2008, 11:50 AM
When we played our best game of the season and lost 17-15 in the bottom of the 6th when one of our less developed players was chasing moths in the left field and missed the ball, I took them out for ice cream.
I hope you put moths on the fugger's ice cream cone that cost you the game. Slackers... :shake:

RJ
07-21-2008, 11:50 AM
We are playing a Fountain Bluff League so we follow their rules first, then USSSA rules.

Fountain bluff rules state:
Leadoffs and stealing are allowed for 9-14 year olds with the following exception; No stealing home. 9 and 10 year olds cannot run on a dropped 3rd strike. the only way to advance to home from 3rd base is if he is forced in, batted in, or a pick off attempt at any base. He may not advance on a passed ball by the catcher. He may not advance on an overthrow back to the pitcher.


Wow, that surprises me. I think it's a bad rule - the leading off part - but you can only play by the rules you're given. I know that when I coached there were often "gentlemen's agreements" between the coaches regarding such matters. Seems like if you let the kids run at will you'd be out there all night.

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 11:56 AM
Great! It isn't surprising that this rule wasn't upheld with most of our umpires being high school age, but I am glad I won't have to deal with this part of the game.

Since we are on the subject of etiquette, I will generally not take advantage of the lack of ability in young players for the sake of winning. When base coaching I will help the defensive players if they need some coaching. Another thing I do it to only send the runners one base on an over throw, and if the ball is in the infield I will hold the runner whether or not they could score. Very few 8U teams have enough players to field the infield that can make perfect throws and catches and rather than telling my fastest players to never stop running and make them get you out, (one team did this and scored 3 in the park homeruns off of routine singles), I try to do the best thing to develop the players.

My next question is with 9U kid pitch regards stealing bases. The wind-up is going to be slow and IF the catcher catches the ball the chances of the 2nd baseman covering the bag and the catcher having the arm to throw it to him are very slim. So stealing bases is going to be like taking candy from a baby. How did you handle this situation? I have read a lot of on-line articles where the coaches tell there base runners that the steal is always ON, unless the 3b coach says otherwise but I don't know what the etiquette is for this situation.
Etiquette/unwritten rule is that its okay to steal whenever you can until you reach "the spread" this is true at all ages all the way into high school. Then its okay to advance on a passed ball up until you reach 15 runs ahead or 10 runs ahead in the 2nd inning then you don't run regardless of passed balls.

But you are always allowed to hit and pitch your best at all times. But in blow outs you always see the #4 or #5 pitcher come in to get the innings.

Demonpenz
07-21-2008, 12:01 PM
if the game was close on over throws I would play like grown up baseball and take as many bases as you can within the rules. The first time you get gunned down sure burns in your mind to pick up your 3rd base coach and watch the kids warming up to see who has the hose.

Swanman
07-21-2008, 12:04 PM
Here's my take on the whole issue. For kids like 13 and under, you probably shouldn't be teaching them to take out catchers/fielders. Too many kids wouldn't know what the hell they're doing and hurt each other. But once they reach high school age and real competitive baseball starts, then it becomes time for real baseball. For example, if the catcher is standing 5 feet up the third base line in front of the plate, that baseline belongs to the runner and the catcher can get taken out. If the catcher is on the plate, the runner should probably slide, however. Same applies at the other bases, if the fielder is impeding the runner from advancing by standing up the baseline, contact is okay as long as it isn't malicious.

KC Kings
07-21-2008, 12:06 PM
Etiquette/unwritten rule is that its okay to steal whenever you can until you reach "the spread" this is true at all ages all the way into high school. Then its okay to advance on a passed ball up until you reach 15 runs ahead or 10 runs ahead in the 2nd inning then you don't run regardless of passed balls.

But you are always allowed to hit and pitch your best at all times. But in blow outs you always see the #4 or #5 pitcher come in to get the innings.

So for double-header fall ball leagues, how many players do you think I should carry? We can have up to 15, but with 9 on the field I don't want half the team jacking around in the dugout. USSSA has no pitch count, (though I will use it), so if I have a pitcher struggling in game one, I can pull him but let him pitch again in game 2 as long as he doesn't exceed 6 innings per day.

I don't want boys to be bored on the bench, but I don't want a bunch of 8 year olds getting to tired playing 3 hours+ of baseball while it is still hot in September. I always hear that you should take a few players as possible and try to remove all weak links since you bat the line-up, but I think double-headers are going to be different. Do you think 12 is enough?

Demonpenz
07-21-2008, 12:08 PM
Here's my take on the whole issue. For kids like 13 and under, you probably shouldn't be teaching them to take out catchers/fielders. Too many kids wouldn't know what the hell they're doing and hurt each other. But once they reach high school age and real competitive baseball starts, then it becomes time for real baseball. For example, if the catcher is standing 5 feet up the third base line in front of the plate, that baseline belongs to the runner and the catcher can get taken out. If the catcher is on the plate, the runner should probably slide, however. Same applies at the other bases, if the fielder is impeding the runner from advancing by standing up the baseline, contact is okay as long as it isn't malicious.

There are rules against running over the catcher even in college

KC Kings
07-21-2008, 12:12 PM
if the game was close on over throws I would play like grown up baseball and take as many bases as you can within the rules. The first time you get gunned down sure burns in your mind to pick up your 3rd base coach and watch the kids warming up to see who has the hose.

I agree to a point. Coaching 3rd base, even at 8U, takes some work and understanding of your team. If you are too agressive early in the game, the other team will come back just as agressive and it might bite you in the butt later in the game. You have to know the line-up and if I have 0 or 1 outs with a hitter on deck, I might hold the runner at 3rd as a good-will gesture, knowing that he is going to score anyway. We weren't behind too many games, but if it is close or if I have a chance to run spread them and end the game, I will send runners more agressively.

I also was very agressive sending players around for in-the-park homers when they were the 7th or 8th run so the inning was officially over. Letting a boy score a home-run will increase his running speed and stamina by 10% for the rest of the season. Of course I would also run over to the other dugout and immediately explain that I wasn't trying to be a jerk and only sent him because the runs didn't count.

Demonpenz
07-21-2008, 12:19 PM
With the Wolfpack (37-19) trailing by a run with two outs and the bases loaded in the bottom of the eighth inning, Nick Stanley hit a ball sharply to right field which brought two runs home to give the ‘Pack a 9-8 lead. Foschi, who was on first, tried to make it a third run, but Tech’s relay throw to catcher Jason Haniger was on time.

Foschi tried to jar the ball loose from Haniger by lowering his shoulder as he plowed into the Georgia Tech catcher. Though Haniger hung on to the baseball, Foschi was automatically called out and thrown out of the game due to an ACC rule the prohibits a catcher from being run over at the plate.

“I had no problem with that call,” N.C. State coach Elliot Avent said. “(Home plate umpire) Randy Harvey is one of the best. He said he had to be ejected and I had no problem with that.”

Foschi’s decision to run over Haniger came back to haunt N.C. State in the top of the ninth as three straight errors to open up the inning allowed Tech (39-17) to score the tying and game-winning runs. Foschi’s replacement, Russell Wilson, booted a ball at short that allowed the tying and winning runs to come home.

“It seemed like we were in a game we always win and some funny things happened down the stretch,” Avent said.

DeezNutz
07-21-2008, 12:29 PM
These kids are 8 and 9, and you're asking about plowing a fielder? :shake:

Definitely wait until they're 11 because this is when the scouts start to come out in force. College scholarships should start coming in when they're 12, with some really, really good prospects drafted at 13. Also, make sure that you're "that guy." Question the ump's strikezone judgement whenever possible, and cause a scene when your outfielders start to play in the dirt because, you know, they should be "into the game" at 8-9.

Check your perspective. It sounds like you're trying to be a good guy, but don't let all the time and effort you're investing distort reality. These kids are babies, essentially. Have fun. Be Mr. Happy and Positivity. Focus on basic fundamentals and hope that most of your players aren't pissing themselves on the bench. When all of your players can wipe their own asses, then worry about some more advanced things. Seriously, I vote for more ice cream.

KC Kings
07-21-2008, 12:40 PM
These kids are 8 and 9, and you're asking about plowing a fielder? :shake:

Definitely wait until they're 11 because this is when the scouts start to come out in force. College scholarships should start coming in when they're 12, with some really, really good prospects drafted at 13. Also, make sure that you're "that guy." Question the ump's strikezone judgement whenever possible, and cause a scene when your outfielders start to play in the dirt because, you know, they should be "into the game" at 8-9.

Check your perspective. Have fun. Focus on basic fundamentals and hope that most of your players aren't pissing themselves on the bench. When all of your players can wipe their own asses, then worry about some more advanced things.

I try to actually read the posts before I reply, but that is just me.

DeezNutz
07-21-2008, 12:46 PM
I try to actually read the posts before I reply, but that is just me.

I read through the thread. What part did I misrepresent? I edited my intial post to give you some props for trying to be a good dude, and it's more than clear that you don't want your kids to hurt anyone, but, by virtue of asking the initial question, it seems like you're starting to get into this pretty deep.

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 01:30 PM
So for double-header fall ball leagues, how many players do you think I should carry? We can have up to 15, but with 9 on the field I don't want half the team jacking around in the dugout. USSSA has no pitch count, (though I will use it), so if I have a pitcher struggling in game one, I can pull him but let him pitch again in game 2 as long as he doesn't exceed 6 innings per day.

I don't want boys to be bored on the bench, but I don't want a bunch of 8 year olds getting to tired playing 3 hours+ of baseball while it is still hot in September. I always hear that you should take a few players as possible and try to remove all weak links since you bat the line-up, but I think double-headers are going to be different. Do you think 12 is enough?
Thats the trick. You want to keep as few as possible but enough to where you don't get caught short on Pitching. Most teams won't carry more than 12 until they hit high school.

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 01:40 PM
That is true also. You don't want kids swinging at crap either, but there is a line.
right. If its close and we are way up and the pitcher can't find the strike zone is different from we are trying to come back.

You'll find that most teams won't have quality pitchers to bring in so if you can get past the starter you may be able to turn the game around.

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 01:49 PM
I have a bunch of ball cards that you could pass out to the players if you want them? I use to motivate them after games with a game "MVP" voted on by the players and another "MVP" from the coaches given to the kid who tried their hardest and was a good teammate. I created a MVP hat they could keep during the week. Wear to games and practices. It became a really big deal to earn the "MVP" hat. At the end of the year the players voted for the "MVP" for the year and that player got to keep the hat.

I've had several players tell me that their "MVP" hat is the most valuable possesion they have ever had. One of the rules was that if you were voted the MVP hat you had earned it, it was yours. You could give it to another player if you so chose.

At my teams party one year after the MVP hat had been awared to the player he turned around and gave me the hat and said I was the true MVP. The players and parents stood up and gave me a standing O. That hat is one of the most valuable possesions that I have.

jidar
07-21-2008, 02:16 PM
You never teach a kid to take out a fielder. Ever. By the time it's legal for them to do that they will have professional coaches teaching them that aspect of the game, so as a parent or youth coach all you teach your kids to do is avoid the fielders. If the fielder shouldn't have been there it's up to the ump to call interference and advance the runner.

VAChief
07-21-2008, 02:23 PM
Win at all costs. Nothing else matters.

2nd place is for losers.

The catcher I played with in high school and college would have probably laid you out. He routinely gave more than he got in those situations, unless someone blindsided him (which is totally bush).

One game I remember this guy came barrelling in, dead as nails, but instead of sliding decided to take him on Pete Rose style...our catcher braced himself with the ball in his right, glove on top sprung up...planted the glove right in his Adams apple...poor ba****d closelined himself. I'm sure his daddy taught him too.

Dirty plays come around to haunt you. If someone took out my catcher in a dirty, unnecessary play, the next time up they would have gotten one in the ribs (never the head, at least not intentionally).

KC Kings
07-21-2008, 02:28 PM
I read through the thread. What part did I misrepresent? I edited my intial post to give you some props for trying to be a good dude, but, by virtue of asking the initial question, it seems like you're starting to get into this pretty deep.

I guess I see where you are coming from, when the thread heading at all. I am glad that this is against the rules, because there is really no sportsmanlike way to move fielder out of the baseline.

I have always gotten deep into youth sports. Whether it is t-ball, baseball, basketball, or football, I don't want to be the coach that just wears a shirt and tries to herd cats for a couple of weeks. Parents pay money and invest their time into having their child have fun while learning a sport, and it is the coaches job to make sure that both of those objectives are met. Don't get me wrong, having fun is still the number one priority and I will smash a pink t-ball helmet on my fat head for a rally cap and do whatever it takes for the players to have fun, but I also want to make sure that I am doing everything I can to teach the kids about the sport. This will be my sons 6th season of baseball, (including pop-flys and t-ball), so I have read thousands of web pages and many books on how to best coach the kids. I have a hundred ways to teach the fundamentals in a fun way from the alligator chomping the ball to jumping on your skateboard, spread your wings, and point, point, point to get the ball to your target.

I am not trying to take any of the fun away from the sport, but going from machine pitch to kid pitch is almost an entirely different sport. Most of the material you find is either geared towards psycho competitive or is very outdated.

KC Kings
07-21-2008, 02:46 PM
I have a bunch of ball cards that you could pass out to the players if you want them? I use to motivate them after games with a game "MVP" voted on by the players and another "MVP" from the coaches given to the kid who tried their hardest and was a good teammate. I created a MVP hat they could keep during the week. Wear to games and practices. It became a really big deal to earn the "MVP" hat. At the end of the year the players voted for the "MVP" for the year and that player got to keep the hat.

I've had several players tell me that their "MVP" hat is the most valuable possesion they have ever had. One of the rules was that if you were voted the MVP hat you had earned it, it was yours. You could give it to another player if you so chose.

At my teams party one year after the MVP hat had been awared to the player he turned around and gave me the hat and said I was the true MVP. The players and parents stood up and gave me a standing O. That hat is one of the most valuable possesions that I have.

Thanks for the offer. I bought a bunch of MLB cards, but due to lack of response I had to move to Pokemon cards. We also hand out the game ball to a player after each game, but I think I will use your MVP hat idea also.

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 02:59 PM
Thanks for the offer. I bought a bunch of MLB cards, but due to lack of response I had to move to Pokemon cards. We also hand out the game ball to a player after each game, but I think I will use your MVP hat idea also.
I did the game ball but that doesn't last and they can't bring it to the game and practice. And you develop team chemistry with the MVP hat also. Soon the players will be voting for the player thats been in a slump and busts out. The player whos working hard and encouraging teammates but not having success on the field. When that happens you know you have done your job.

DeezNutz
07-21-2008, 03:13 PM
I guess I see where you are coming from, when the thread heading at all. I am glad that this is against the rules, because there is really no sportsmanlike way to move fielder out of the baseline.

I have always gotten deep into youth sports. Whether it is t-ball, baseball, basketball, or football, I don't want to be the coach that just wears a shirt and tries to herd cats for a couple of weeks. Parents pay money and invest their time into having their child have fun while learning a sport, and it is the coaches job to make sure that both of those objectives are met. Don't get me wrong, having fun is still the number one priority and I will smash a pink t-ball helmet on my fat head for a rally cap and do whatever it takes for the players to have fun, but I also want to make sure that I am doing everything I can to teach the kids about the sport. This will be my sons 6th season of baseball, (including pop-flys and t-ball), so I have read thousands of web pages and many books on how to best coach the kids. I have a hundred ways to teach the fundamentals in a fun way from the alligator chomping the ball to jumping on your skateboard, spread your wings, and point, point, point to get the ball to your target.

I am not trying to take any of the fun away from the sport, but going from machine pitch to kid pitch is almost an entirely different sport. Most of the material you find is either geared towards psycho competitive or is very outdated.

:thumb: Good for you. It sounds like you'll be a great coach for the kids.

I've been involved in youth sports for a long time, and I've seen too often when a crazy parent or coach ruins the experience for everyone. It's understandable in some ways because, like I said, individuals put forth so much of their time that they start to lose sight of what's really happening.

Quick example of what I mean: I was talking to a coach of a competitive 13U team, and I was asking him how many games his team would be playing over the summer. He said around 60, and when I had a look of shock on my face, he responded with, "Well, my son wants to play college ball."

Sooooo....he's trying to prepare a kid, who hasn't entered high school, let alone made a high school team, let alone played varsity, let alone become a really good player on a varsity team, to play college baseball? Do you see how ****ed up this is? And the problem is that this guy thought he was normal. Wow. Again, youth sports causes craziness in othewise normal folks.

Consistent1
07-21-2008, 03:56 PM
:thumb: Good for you. It sounds like you'll be a great coach for the kids.

I've been involved in youth sports for a long time, and I've seen too often when a crazy parent or coach ruins the experience for everyone. It's understandable in some ways because, like I said, individuals put forth so much of their time that they start to lose sight of what's really happening.

Quick example of what I mean: I was talking to a coach of a competitive 13U team, and I was asking him how many games his team would be playing over the summer. He said around 60, and when I had a look of shock on my face, he responded with, "Well, my son wants to play college ball."

Sooooo....he's trying to prepare a kid, who hasn't entered high school, let alone made a high school team, let alone played varsity, let alone become a really good player on a varsity team, to play college baseball? Do you see how ****ed up this is? And the problem is that this guy thought he was normal. Wow. Again, youth sports causes craziness in othewise normal folks.


Very true. I think some people think that they can get an easy payday off the kids. Hell, our silly ass neighbor, who is female and does not know shit about sports was talking about getting her boy in t-ball so they could get rich. Yeah, that is realistic. The kid sucked at just making contact playing in the yard. Underhand toss mind you, but he "smoked" one that provided the above sentiment. There is no way that I would want to coach teams and hear all the wishful thinking crap that goes on.

POND_OF_RED
07-21-2008, 04:10 PM
Your best bet is to make the kids watch video of the 2003 Chiefs Defense. This will teach them to be afraid of making contact but if it is necessary, to do so in a delicate manner.

BigRedChief
07-21-2008, 04:13 PM
:thumb: Good for you. It sounds like you'll be a great coach for the kids.

I've been involved in youth sports for a long time, and I've seen too often when a crazy parent or coach ruins the experience for everyone. It's understandable in some ways because, like I said, individuals put forth so much of their time that they start to lose sight of what's really happening.

Quick example of what I mean: I was talking to a coach of a competitive 13U team, and I was asking him how many games his team would be playing over the summer. He said around 60, and when I had a look of shock on my face, he responded with, "Well, my son wants to play college ball."

Sooooo....he's trying to prepare a kid, who hasn't entered high school, let alone made a high school team, let alone played varsity, let alone become a really good player on a varsity team, to play college baseball? Do you see how ****ed up this is? And the problem is that this guy thought he was normal. Wow. Again, youth sports causes craziness in othewise normal folks.
Yep, been there done that. I kept my kids at the "AA" level but we did play at the "AAA" level in tournaments. Our schedule was like this......


Right after the New years holiday we would start a once a week trip to the batting cages. In the more recent years we were in a once a week hitting league.
4 weeks before it would be warm enough to get outside we would add an additional day of practice by renting an indoor facility for an hour to practice ground balls etc.
In the month of March weather permitting we practiced twice a week outside and a trip to the batting cages.
We would start playing in tournaments the first week of April. We would play in a tournament from this point on every other weekend until the state tournament(Usually arounf July 4th). This gives the kids and parents off every other weekend to enjoy the lake or just not sit out at the ball field all weekend.
We would also play in a league. Usually a double header league on Wednesday or Tuesday nights. 16 games or so.
We never traveled out of town. All tournaments were local to the KC area. The farthest we went was Warrensburg or Gardner ks. This kept the cost down considerably.
We would go through around $7,000 a season as a team. But with sponsors/donations we kept the parents out of pocket expenses to $350.00 or less per season.