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View Full Version : Economics Wachovia loses $8.9B, cuts 6,350 workers, dividend


bkkcoh
07-22-2008, 12:41 PM
Link (http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080722/earns_wachovia.html?.v=19)


Wachovia loses $8.9B, cuts 6,350 workers, dividend
Tuesday July 22, 2:12 pm ET
By Ieva M. Augstums, AP Business Writer
Wachovia slashes dividend, jobs, to shut mortgage unit after $8.86B loss in second quarter

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) -- Wachovia Corp. reported a surprisingly large second-quarter loss Tuesday, deflating Wall Street's hopes that the nation's big banks are weathering the credit crisis well. The bank said it lost $8.86 billion, is slashing its dividend and eliminating 10,750 positions after losses tied to mortgages soared.
Even excluding one-time items, the results substantially missed analysts' estimates.

But by the afternoon its stock joined a modest Wall Street rally and rose as much as 13 percent -- after its shares sank to mid-1991 levels in premarket trading, and after Wachovia's new CEO said he plans to cut $2 billion of expenses by the end of next year and sell parts of the fourth-biggest U.S. bank.

Its shares rose $1.19, or 9 percent, to $14.37 in afternoon trading.

"Our reported results today are clearly a disappointing performance for which we take responsibility," said Wachovia's Chief Executive Bob Steel on a conference call with analysts. "We are serious about getting on top of these issues quickly and we believe we have a good grasp of the challenges facing the economy, the industry and Wachovia."

Three rating agencies -- Moody's Investors Service, Standard & Poor's and Fitch Ratings -- downgraded their ratings on Wachovia's debt, citing increased expectations of losses in the bank's mortgage portfolio and its reduced flexibility to raise new capital.

Wachovia said it lost the equivalent of $4.20 per share in the April-June period. In the same timeframe last year, the bank earned $2.34 billion, or $1.22 per share.

Excluding $6.1 billion in write-downs to the value of its intangible assets and merger-related and restructuring charges of $128 million, Wachovia lost $2.67 billion, or $1.27 per share. Second quarter results include the bank's October acquisition of A.G. Edwards Inc., which the bank said the merger is proceeding as planned and is 40 percent complete.

Analysts on average expected a loss of 78 cents per share on revenue of almost $8.4 billion.

Earlier this month, the Charlotte-based bank had projected a $2.6 billion to $2.8 billion quarterly loss, equal to $1.23 to $1.33 per share, excluding goodwill items.

"Wachovia's new management has pulled its head of out the sand and is fully acknowledging the problems not challenges," said Bart Narter, senior analyst at Celent, a Boston-based financial research and consulting firm. "While the company's wealth management, corporate and investment banks, and capital management groups all had more encouraging results than the general bank, the general bank is the bulk of Wachovia and it isn't performing well."

Wachovia cut its quarterly dividend to 5 cents per share from 37.5 cents, which will conserve approximately $700 million of capital per quarter. In April, Wachovia slashed its dividend 41 percent.

Steel, who replaced ousted Ken Thompson earlier this month, said it was "clearly prudent and necessary" to further cut the dividend.

"While this is a difficult decision, it is the best course for our shareholders over the long term," he said.

Steel said the company is moving to "sell selected non-core assets" and reduce the number of business customers who only use the bank for loans rather than other services. Wachovia expects to cut expenses during the second half of this year by $490 million and then reduce 2009 spending by $1.5 billion.

As part of that plan, Wachovia said it would lay off 6,350 workers, affecting more than 5 percent to fits roughly 120,000 employees. A majority of those jobs will come from the mortgage area, Steel said.

Wachovia also said it will also eliminate 4,400 open positions and contractors. The bank has already cut 2,000 retail mortgage jobs, it said.

During the quarter, the Wachovia boosted its provision for loan losses to $5.57 billion from $179 million a year ago, and added $4.2 billion to its reserves for bad loans.

Results also included a $975 million charge related to the tax treatment of leveraged leases, $936 million of losses from disrupted capital markets, a $590 million charge for other legal matters, and $391 million of losses on securities sales.

Wachovia's current problems stem largely from its acquisition of mortgage lender Golden West Financial Corp. in 2006 for roughly $25 billion at the height of the nation's housing boom. With that purchase, Wachovia inherited a deteriorating $122 billion portfolio of Pick-A-Payment loans, Golden West's specialty, which let borrowers skip some payments.

Wachovia's increase in loan loss reserves included $3.3 billion related to the "Pick-a-Payment" mortgage portfolio. In April, the bank tightened underwriting standards, and last month it stopped offering an option on "Pick-A-Payment" loans that let borrowers pay less than the interest owed. On Monday, Wachovia said it will stop offering home loans through brokers.

Wachovia said it is setting aside $10.96 billion for credit losses, up from $6.77 billion in the first quarter and $3.55 billion a year earlier. Net charge-offs, loans it doesn't think are collectable, increased more than eight-fold from a year earlier to $1.31 billion.

Profits in consumer and business banking, Wachovia's largest unit, fell 23 percent to $1.12 billion, hurt by rising credit costs, mainly for mortgages.

The corporate and investment banking unit had a $209 million profit, down 73 percent, reflecting write-downs tied to subprime mortgages, commercial mortgages, non-subprime debt and consumer mortgages.

Capital management profit fell 5 percent to $297 million, hurt by the liquidation of an Evergreen Investments fund, while wealth management profit rose 9 percent to $98 million.


How many more financial institutions are going to have similar issues and how many banks can the federal government send out a life preserver for?

Nightfyre
07-22-2008, 12:43 PM
Link (http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/080722/earns_wachovia.html?.v=19)



How many more financial institutions are going to have similar issues and how many banks can the federal government send out a life preserver for?

Well, given the history of this Fed and Secretary Paulson, I don't know what would stop them from bailing out their buddies. They certainly aren't afraid of inflation. Maybe they can print a $100 billion bill to make their problems go away.

SBK
07-22-2008, 12:45 PM
Why cut jobs and expenses? Just go ask Helicopter Ben for a few hundred billion and call it a day.

bkkcoh
07-22-2008, 12:46 PM
Well, given the history of this Fed and Secretary Paulson, I don't know what would stop them from bailing out their buddies. They certainly aren't afraid of inflation. Maybe they can print a $100 billion bill to make their problems go away.

the federal government is between a rock and a hard place though, if they end up keeping up with what they have done so far, the treasury department will have to print a million or billion bill and it will be worth about as much as the paper it is printed on. :banghead:

Nightfyre
07-22-2008, 12:54 PM
the federal government is between a rock and a hard place though, if they end up keeping up with what they have done so far, the treasury department will have to print a million or billion bill and it will be worth about as much as the paper it is printed on. :banghead:

Oh yea, the federal government is between a rock and a hard place to maintain an economy built on gigantic excesses of credit which results in malinvestment (see housing bubble.) Clearly their interest is in stability and sustainability. :rolleyes:

bkkcoh
07-22-2008, 02:09 PM
Link (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=asXjYQuEUW4Q&refer=worldwide)

By Greg Miles and Caroline Salas

July 22 (Bloomberg) -- General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co., the two biggest U.S. automakers, have about a 46 percent chance of default within five years, according to Edward Altman, a finance professor at New York University's Stern School of Business.

``Both are in very serious shape and the markets reflect that,'' Altman, the creator of the Z-score mathematical formula that measures bankruptcy risk, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television. The model shows that these companies are ``on the verge of bankruptcy,'' he said.

The Z-scores for GM and Ford give both a bond rating equivalent to a CCC ranking, though GM is in slightly worse condition than Ford, Altman said. GM reported a $38.7 billion loss in 2007, the biggest in its 100-year history, and hasn't posted a profit since 2004. The scores are based on the companies' finances at the end of the first quarter.

Moody's Investors Service said July 15 it may cut GM's Caa1 senior unsecured debt rating because the Detroit-based automaker's plan to raise at least $15 billion by suspending its dividend, cutting management payroll by 20 percent and selling assets may not be enough to offset losses. Standard & Poor's also said in June it may lower GM's B rating. Altman said the plan to raise $15 billion may improve GM's outlook.

Ford, based in Dearborn, Michigan, is rated Caa1 by Moody's and B by S&P, which said in June that Ford's rating may also be cut.

Ability to Refinance

``The thing that triggers a default in almost all cases is running out of cash and not being able to refinance,'' Altman said in an interview prior to his television appearance. ``You're not going to go bankrupt as long as you can refinance short-term liabilities. You will go bankrupt if you can't.''

GM Chief Executive Officer Rick Wagoner said in an interview July 15 that the company has the ability to raise cash, and he called bankruptcy ``a bad idea.'' Ford has said it had access to $40.6 billion in funds as of March 31, including credit lines.

GM's $3 billion of 8.375 percent bonds due in 2033 fell 1 cent to 57 cents on the dollar as of 1:56 p.m. today in New York, according to Trace, the bond-price reporting system of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. The debt yields 15 percent, or 1,033 basis points more than similar-maturity Treasuries.

Bonds that trade at a spread of 1,000 basis points or more to Treasuries are considered distressed, indicating investors are concerned that the company will default. A basis point is 0.01 percentage point.

``I would not put money with GM right now because the downside is so great relative to the upside, relative to the yield,'' said Altman, speaking in New York. ``Your downside is probably 60 percent on the debt. The risk reward ratio is pretty poor.''

eazyb81
07-22-2008, 02:30 PM
Wachovia and Merrill just took it in the ass, but Citi, BofA, JPMorgan, Goldman, etc. are doing fine and/or are on the upswing.

Wachovia desperately wants to be acquired, which is the sole reason they brought Steel on board, but I'm not sure if anyone will bite. The rumor on the street was Goldman would swoop in, but I think that's a long shot now.